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January 4, 2017

Fauquier SPCA appoints new executive director

Photo/Don Del Rosso
Fauquier SPCA Clinic Manager Maddy Garrison talks with new Executive Director Devon Settle at the Casanova shelter.
A lot of people think of us as just the county shelter. We’re a rescue organization. I want make it more open to the public. I want to get back into the community and let people know we’re here.
— Devon Settle, Fauquier SPCA executive director
Devon Settle
• Age: 41

• Home: Amissville

• Work: Executive director, Fauquier SPCA, effective January 1; deputy executive director, March-December 2016.

• Experience: Licensed veterinary technician, Piedmont Pets Veterinary Care, Warrenton, 2001-16.

• Education: Bachelor’s degree, education and communications, University of Georgia, 1997; St. Anne’s-Belfield School, Charlottesville, 1993.

• Family: Husband, Robert Settle; daughter, Morgan, 5 years old.
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Staff Journalist
Fauquier’s SPCA has a new executive director.

Devon Settle, who lives in Amissville, started the job Jan. 1. Ms. Settle succeeds Mary Tarr, who lead the nonprofit organization for six years.

A longtime SPCA volunteer, Ms. Settle had served as deputy executive director since March 2016.

Established in 1957, the organization’s shelter and adoption center stand on 11.6 acres at 9350 Rogues Road near Casanova.

Among her top goals, Ms. Settle wants to raise the organization’s profile and educate the community about its mission.

“A lot of people think of us as just the county shelter,” said the executive director, a licensed veterinary technician. “We’re a rescue organization. I want make it more open to the public. I want to get back into the community and let people know we’re here. I want make the it more open to the public.”

“There’s so much misinformation about who we are and what we do,” said SPCA Treasurer Tim Nevill, who began volunteering with the organization about 35 years ago. “We’re not just a dumping ground for unwanted pets.”

The organization last year placed 423 cats, 330 dogs and 22 rabbits.

It also accepts other household pets —  snakes, hamsters and Guinea pigs, for example — and livestock.

“We welcome all animals,” said Ms. Settle, 41. “We’ve had horses, goats, sheep. You get a little bit of everything.”

But, the organization accepts no animals from outside Fauquier, she said.

Under state law, county governments must provide animal shelter services. Local government can operate a shelter or pay for such services. For decades, Fauquier has contracted the SPCA to operate the shelter.

The SPCA’s 2016 budget totaled about $900,000, according to Ms. Settle. Fauquier County last year gave the group $300,000.

The organization raises the rest of its revenue through donations, fundraisers, adoption fees and grants, Mr. Nevill said.

As executive director, Ms. Settle oversees 29 full- and part-time employees and 68 “active” volunteers.

The SPCA hired Ms. Settle last spring as deputy executive director. It did so with the idea that she eventually would lead the organization, Mr. Nevill said.

Because of her professional experience and 10 months as the SPCA’s deputy director, Ms. Settle will provide the leadership the group needs, he said.

“I have no concerns she will fulfill our expectations,” Mr. Nevill said.

“I was tired,” Ms. Tarr said of her resignation. “It’s a 24/7 job.”

But, she will miss the staff and aspects of the job, the Orlean resident said.

“It’s great when you can place an animal in a loving home,” said Ms. Tarr, 57. “Nothing made me feel better than when someone came in and said we had one of the nicest, cleanest and friendliest shelters in the area.”

“Mary did a good job,” Mr. Nevill said. “She was there for six years; it ran her down. It’s a very stressful job. We hope she’ll find something that entertains her.”


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tffirestone · January 5, 2017 at 11:22 am
Mary,
Thanks for a great job and service to the SPCA and our 4 legged friends!!
Dave Jenkins
TooTrue · January 4, 2017 at 2:52 pm
Mary is a jewel and will be missed.
rto10049 · January 4, 2017 at 2:23 pm
THANKS MARY TARR FOR YEARS OF SERVICE GREAT LADY RIGHT THERE.
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