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July 22, 2013

Deputy Dawn Rosenberry wins college scholarship

After earning her associate’s degree, Dawn Rosenberry started her law enforcement career in 2006 and joined the sheriff’s office two years later.
At the June 23 award ceremony in Charlotte: National Sheriff's Association President Larry D. Amerson, Columbia Southern University President Robert Mayes, Deputy Rosenberry and Fauquier County Sheriff Charlie Ray Fox Jr.
Fauquier Sheriff’s Deputy Dawn Rosenberry has won a scholarship to complete her bachelor’s degree at Columbia Southern University.

Competing in an essay contest, Deputy Rosenberry is one of two law enforcement professionals chosen nationwide for a full two-year scholarship. Her essay focused on the greatest challenges sheriffs face in today’s ailing economy.

Deputy Rosenberry began her career in January 2006 as a parking enforcement officer with the Warrenton Police Department. She joined the sheriff’s office in 2008, working in the detention center, then the Civil Process Division and as a resource officer at Auburn Middle School. She has been assigned to the Patrol Division since June.

She is a certified crime prevention specialist and a certified instructor in the National Rifle Association’s “Refuse to be a Victim” program. She grew up in Amissville and lives in the area with her husband Ross.

Columbia Southern University and the National Sheriffs’ Association awarded the scholarship at the NSA National Conference on June 23 in Charlotte, N.C.

Through a partnership with CSU, members of the NSA can compete in an essay contest for two-year scholarships to be used toward an online degree at the university.

“I applied for this scholarship because it has been a goal of mine for some time to complete my bachelor’s degree,” explained Deputy Rosenberry, who will seek an online bachelor’s degree in criminal justice administration. “I earned my associate degree in criminal justice in December 2005 and began my career in law enforcement immediately after.

“Like many others in my position, it was hard to make the decision to return to school when I am still paying student loans from my previous degree. I ultimately decided that I would make it work no matter what because it was something that was important to me.”

Deputy Rosenberry said she has had an interest in public service and the criminal justice system since high school.

“After beginning my career and watching my co-workers in their different roles, I found that it was the patrol and crime prevention aspects that I was really interested in,” she said.

“I love the interaction that I am able to have with the community and I am thankful for the opportunity that we have to make a difference in the lives of others. This degree will aid in my career both now and in the future. Any knowledge, whether it be college, training, or work experience, is key to a successful career.”
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