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October 9, 2019

Education takes more than saying, “Don’t do drugs”

Virginia Beach School Board member Carolyn Weems and her husband lost their 21-year-old daughter in 2013. The young woman became addicted to painkillers prescribed for soccer injuries.
Opioid series Part 3 sidebar

It seemed pretty clear to the suburban mom what she needed to do.

Carolyn Weems remembered how little she and her husband, Billy, knew about the dangers of opioids when their daughter, Caitlyn, became addicted to painkillers prescribed for soccer injuries. In April 2013, she died of a heroin overdose at age 21.

“We were clueless,” Ms. Weems said. “None of our doctors or dentists sat down with us and told us that this stuff was powerful, that it has a high rate of dependency, that the pills she was taking were basically the same thing as heroin. We had none of that information. We did what the doctors said.”

So, after Caitlyn died, Ms. Weems, a member of the Virginia Beach School Board, began working with the school system’s staff to develop a curriculum that educated children — and their families — about opioids. Last year, the Virginia General Assembly voted to endorse the curriculum as a model for other school systems. Culpeper County schools began using it this school year.

“We looked at what was being taught and found that opioids were mentioned in one lesson in the eighth grade,” she said. “I felt it needed to be part of the curriculum all the way through.”

That meant starting in the first grade, although opioids aren’t addressed in depth until the ninth and 10th grades. Those students are required to do a PowerPoint presentation on how opioids affect the body and brain, how they increase the risk of injury, and the health benefits of abstaining from drug use.

The subject matter is more general in the lower grades. First-graders do role-playing on what they should do if they find pills lying on a countertop or when a friend’s mother offers them medicine when they have a headache. In grades 3 through 5, the focus shifts to how risky behavior can result from drug use and how to refuse an offer of over-the-counter drugs from a friend.

Through the middle school years, the lessons cover recognizing influence and pressure from family, friends and the media; finding ways to manage stress and anxiety to avoid using drugs; and understanding the short-term and long-term effects of drugs, including opiates. 

“With this generation, you can’t just say, ‘Don’t do drugs,’ ” Ms. Weems said. “You have to equip these kids with information and give them knowledge. Some people will tell me, ‘I can’ believe you’re doing this in the first grade.’ But I feel you can’t start early enough. I wouldn’t have said that 10 years ago.

“If I had known one-tenth of what I know now, Caitlyn might have had a chance,” she added. “I don’t want a child or athlete or parents not to have that knowledge.”

It’s progress, Ms. Weems said, but negative attitudes about addiction aren’t easily changed. She noted that when she wanted to open a sober living house for recovering women addicts in Virginia Beach, “I was told, ‘We don’t want those people in our neighborhood.’ My daughter had a scholarship to college. She never had so much as a speeding ticket. ‘Those people’?  Really?” 

— Randy Rieland

> Return to main story: Tactics evolve in the battle against opioid abuse epidemic

> Overdose deaths decline, thanks to Narcan">> Sidebar: Overdose deaths decline, thanks to Narcan
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Thelma J. Henderson · October 18, 2019 at 9:49 am
Thank you so very much for the discussion and coverage of such an important issue! You are a very brave woman! And you are doing very hard and useful work!

Currently, I am writing my dissertation on addictions topic (you can find some info here https://edubirdie.com/dissertation-writing-services I work here as a freelance writer) and there are much more addictions than we used to think... Your story is heartbreaking.

Wish you the best!
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