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November 7, 2019

Throwback Thursday: Yes to elected school board

November 1994: Eric Rizer — with sons Alexander, 4, and Nicholas, 2 — studies sample ballot Tuesday at the polls in Marshall.
25 Years Ago
From The Fauquier Citizen edition of November 11, 1994


Voters overwhelmingly OK school board elections

Seventy-six percent of Fauquier voters (10,922 to 3,429) decided Tuesday the county’s public education system would be better served if citizens directly chose their school board representatives.

For the first time, Fauquier voters will have a chance to elect their school board in November 1995.

As of Tuesday, 101 jurisdictions in Virginia had decided to choose school boards at the ballot box.

Dozens of Fauquier voters interviewed on Election Day said the new method will help break up Fauquier’s entrenched good-old-boy network.

“I think sometimes appointed positions are favors,” Warrenton resident Susan Lauer said after voting at the Warren Green Building. “They (appointees) have done a favor for the job.”

In recent years, the county supervisors have appointed school board members. Previously, a court-appointed School Board Selection Committee had that responsibility.





Vint Hill’s future topic next week

The Vint Hill task force consulting team next week will unveil the first phase of its findings about economic redevelopment potential of the 700-acre Army base near New Baltimore.

The public meeting will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the base movie theater.

During phase one, the consulting team headed by Dewberry and Davis of Northern Virginia focused on information gathering. Among other things, the inch-thick report addresses socio-economic, land-use, infrastructure and recreational issues.

Tuesday’s meeting will allow about 90 minutes for public comment.


29 seek appointment as treasurer

The long list of applicants seeking the job as the county’s interim treasurer includes some familiar names, former County Administrator Steve Crosby among them.

Crosby, who served 11 years as administrator before resigning, is among 29 Fauquier residents who want to complete the remaining year of Republican Bitsy Lineweaver’s four-year term, which will expire Dec. 31, 1995.

Ms. Lineweaver plans to step down next month to accept a job with Multi-One Financial Services in Chesapeake.

A three-judge panel will begin interviewing applicants Nov. 16. The treasurer’s job has a starting salary of $45,187. An elected official, the treasurer oversees 12 employees and a $426,000 annual budget.


Instincts help Ribbons boom

It must take careful analysis and projections to maintain one of Fauquier County’s fastest-growing retailers.

Sitting amid boxes stacked 10 feet high in her cramped “office,” Ribbons Inc. founder and owner Carolyn Hanes laughs.

“I’m a stomach person; I go a lot on instincts,” Ms. Hanes says. “I’ve also been very, very lucky.”

Ribbons experienced a 44-percent gross sales increase from 1992 to ’93. This year should be the best ever for the Hallmark card and gift store in Warrenton’s Oak Springs Plaza, according to Ms. Hanes.

The growth prompted her and husband Scott Schaeffer to sign a 10-year lease for another 1,400 square feet in the busy shopping center. Ribbons has expanded for the second time since 1992 to occupy 4,500 square feet, taking adjacent space that previously housed an ice cream shop.


Exporting trash a possibility

If a four-member citizens’ committee can recommend an environmentally-sound, cost-effective alternative, Fauquier might never bury a single piece of trash at Corral Farm.

In April 1993, the county supervisors paid $2.6 million for the 235-acre farm just south of Warrenton. The plan calls for a new landfill on 122 acres there.

But, before the county builds a new landfill, it again will consider alternatives, including construction of a transfer station, from which Fauquier would ship its trash elsewhere.

The estimated costs, however, favor the landfill option. It would cost $1.9 million a year — or $46 per ton — to operate, according county officials. A transfer station would run up to $3.2 million a year, or $76 per ton.


Miscellaneous for Sale

10-foot satellite dish

General Instruments 271R Receiver-Video Cipher II with remote. Two years old. $1,600. 703-636-xxxx.

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