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Ellen’s Kitchen & Garden

ESL classes starting soon at Warrenton Baptist Church

Posted Tuesday,
January 18, 2022
0 ·

New COVID-19 cases and deaths declining across Va.

Posted Tuesday,
January 18, 2022
0 ·
Wednesday morning Virginia Department of Health update shows slowing spread of COVID-19.
Vaccinations
74.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 53,143. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.6.%.


66.7%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,496. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.4%.


115,920
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning — up 59 from Monday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
The rate of new COVID-19 cases and deaths all continue to show declines here and across the state Tuesday, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Fauquier has 62 new cases and 1 more hospitalized patient over the last 24 hours, the health department reported Tuesday morning.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 10,248 new cases statewide and 8 more deaths. The state’s fatalities total 15,822 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,407,403.

Fauquier’s cases total 11,165 since the pandemic started, with 403 hospitalized patients and 96 deaths.

Over the first 17 days of this year, the county has 2,038 new cases — an average of 120 per day, 44 more hospitalizations — averaging 2.5 a day, and 1 death attributed to COVID-19.

But, Virginia hospitals reported 3,948 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning — up 136 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 89,252 since the pandemic started.

Closed because of inclement weather, Fauquier County Public Schools reported no new cases Tuesday morning.

The schools reported 66 “active cases” Monday — 45 among students and 21 among staff members.

County schools have reported 673 active cases — 485 among students and 188 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

As of last Thursday, the school system had 361 students and 4 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,853 cases, up 25 from Monday morning.

Orange County, 5,723 cases, up 40.

Madison County, 1,675 cases, up 14.

Rappahannock County, 817 cases, up 5.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 32.7 percent statewide and 36.9 percent in the health district — both declining.



Do you support a proposal to end turning clocks forward each spring in Virginia?

Posted Tuesday,
January 18, 2022
0 ·

Culpeper legislator seeks Daylight Savings Time end

Posted Tuesday,
January 18, 2022
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Ned Oliver
Del. Nick Freitas’ proposal differs from the vast majority of other bills that have passed in other states because his legislation makes standard time permanent, rather than shifting to permanent Daylight Saving Time.
I’d say the chances this year are about 50-50.
— Del. Nick Freitas (R-Culpeper)
2022 General Assembly
• Convened: Wednesday, Jan. 12

• Adjourns: Saturday, Feb. 27

• Website: virginiageneralassembly.gov


Fauquier’s legislators


• Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel
(R-27th/Upperville).

• Del. Michael Webert
(R-18th/Marshall).

• Del. Elizabeth Guzman
(D-31st/Woodbridge).

• Del. Phillip Scott
(R-88th/Fredericksburg).
By Ryan McKinnon
The Virginia Mercury

No more falling back or springing forward, if Del. Nick Freitas (R-Culpeper) has his way.

The lawmaker has filed legislation to put an end to Daylight Saving Time in Virginia. The change would eliminate the annual practice of setting clocks forward one hour on the second Sunday of March and then moving clocks back one hour on the first Sunday in November.

Instead, Virginia would stay on Eastern Standard Time, which is the clock we are currently on.

“There’s actually a lot of practical reasons to do it, it’s not just kind of a fun thing,” Del. Freitas said Monday. “I know people see that and are kind of intrigued as to why would you attack an issue like that. But it does have a lot of effects, especially for our students, for drivers, so that’s the reason why we submitted it.”

Del. Freitas said his bill would eliminate the challenges that come with setting the clocks back an hour in the fall and then ahead in the spring. He said research has shown standard time is preferable, but he is less concerned with which clock lawmakers settle on and cares more about picking one and sticking with it.

“Obviously when you are shifting people’s schedules, I think everybody has had that moment of, ‘Oh my gosh the kids are late for the bus,’ or ‘I’m late for work,’” he said.

> POLL: Do you support the proposal to end turning clocks forward each spring in Virginia?

Del. Freitas filed a similar bill in 2018. It died quickly in the House rules committee, in part because of the chaos that such a change could produce if surrounding jurisdictions did not adopt similar changes. A 4 p.m. meeting in Washington, D.C., would be a 5 p.m. meeting across in Arlington for half the year, so Del. Freitas tweaked his 2018 bill to include a provision that Virginia would only shift if surrounding states and D.C. did as well.

This year, Del. Freitas said it is always an option for lawmakers to make the bill contingent on neighboring states’ passing similar measures, but said that “as of right now I am hoping that Virginia will just lead the way.”

Del. Joe McNamara (R-Salem) is taking up the issue as well. He has filed a resolution asking Secretary of Commerce Caren Merrick to conduct a study evaluating the impact of shifting toward year-round daylight saving time, which would make the clock that is now in place during summer months into the all-time clock.

While Del. McNamara agrees with Del. Freitas that changing the clocks twice a year is disruptive, he is hoping his resolution leads the state to permanently turn the clocks forward one hour and go onto DST for good.

“It’s good for tourism, it’s good for mental health,” Del. McNamara said. “The benefits of Daylight saving time have been clearly articulated.”

He filed a similar resolution last year, but former Gov. Ralph Northam’s cabinet declined to pursue the study, Del. McNamara said.

Daylight Savings Time has been a hot topic in statehouses across the country. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, since 2015 there have been at least 350 bills or resolutions that would change a state’s observance of the annual clock switching.

In 2018, Florida became the first state to adopt significant DST reform, with lawmakers passing a bill that would keep Florida on DST permanently.

However, federal law does not allow year-round DST, so Florida and other 18 states that have passed similar measures must wait for Congress to allow the “Spring Forward” clock setting to become permanent.

Del. McNamara is hopeful that Virginia could become the next state to establish year-round DST, which could nudge Congress to lift the prohibition on states following permanent DST.

Del. Freitas’ proposal differs from the vast majority of other bills that have passed in other states because his legislation makes standard time permanent, rather than shifting to permanent DST. “Standard time” refers to the clock between November and March, when daylight saving is not in effect.

When lawmakers talk changes to daylight saving, affected industries tend to weigh in.

Business Insider credited the candy industry with successfully lobbying Congress to push back the end of DST by one week, from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday of November beginning in 2007. The move ensured that children would have more hours of daylight for trick-or-treating.

“Big Candy” isn’t the only industry in the daylight saving fight. On the other side of the argument, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine issued a position statement in 2020, calling for the elimination of Daylight Saving Time.

The academy said “an abundance of accumulated evidence” showed that switching the clocks twice a year “incurs significant public health and safety risks, including increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, mood disorders and motor vehicle crashes.” The sleep doctors said that DST, with late sunsets and long summer evenings, was “less aligned with human circadian biology.”

Del. Freitas said he hasn’t gotten any pushback from outside industries. He is cautiously optimistic that this could be the year for changes to DST. And he isn’t spoiling for a fight over year-round DST versus year-round standard time.

“I do know there is bipartisan support on both sides of the aisle for this type of policy,” he said. “I’d say the chances this year are about 50-50.”

Fauquier schools to keep mask mandate, for now

Posted Monday,
January 17, 2022
0 ·
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Fauquier County students will still be required to wear masks at school until Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s executive order goes into effect at the beginning of next week.

On Saturday, Youngkin signed an executive order stating that as of Jan. 24 students will no longer be “subject to any mask mandate” at either their “school or educational program.” Parents are also not required to “provide a reason or make any certification concerning their child’s health or education,” according to the order.

However, in an e-letter sent to parents and staff on Monday, the Fauquier School Board announced the school system “will keep all current mitigation strategies in place, including the wearing of masks, when students return to school on Tuesday, January 18.”

In the letter, the school board told parents and staff it was waiting for more guidance on COVID-19 mitigation from the state Superintendent of Public Instruction before it makes any final decisions. “We will use this guidance and work with state and local authorities to better understand what the Executive Order means for schools,” the letter said.

During a Fauquier County School Board’s annual all-day summit Jan. 12, board members decided it would follow CDC guidelines, including universal indoor masking by all students (age 2 and older), staff, teachers and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status.

The board’s decision was based on a law passed in the General Assembly in 2021 which requires school divisions to implement “any currently applicable mitigation strategies” recommended by the CDC “to the maximum extent practicable.” The law can’t be overturned by Executive Order, and the General Assembly must pass new legislation.

Fauquier noted in the letter that it would provide parents and staff with an update about masks and mitigation strategies prior to Monday, Jan. 24.

Catlett commercial property sells for $2 million

Posted Monday,
January 17, 2022
0 ·
Google Earth
This 10.4-acre commercial property in Catlett sold for $2 million. It fronts Route 28 across from the Dollar General store (top) and Elk Run Road (left).
An Arlington company recently paid $2 million for four parcels of commercial property totaling 10.4 acres in Catlett.

The property has frontage on Catlett Road (Route 28), across from Dollar General, and on Elk Run Road.

Buildings on the land over the years have housed the Wilson Farms Meat Co., the Cedar Run Antique Center, a vehicle dealership and other businesses. A single-family home and other buildings also stand on the property.

The property went on the market a year ago, with an asking price of $3.3 million.

The sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier property transactions.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Jan. 5-11, 2022:


Cedar Run District

Surrey House LLC, William and Erin Farley as members, to Ryan M. Simpson, 0.86 acre, Lot 9, Warrenton Estates Subdivision, 5287 Balls Mill Road near Midland, $351,555.

Samuel F. and Dorian A. Elswick to Ruvidia and Pablo Quinteros Sr., 1 acre, 4192 Dumfries Road, near Catlett, $473,000.

MMT LP, Trans American Research & Development Corp. as general partner, to Barcroft Terrace Inc., 10.4 acres in 4 parcels, 9223 Elk Run Road, Catlett, $2,000,000.

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as managing member, to NVR Inc., 0.6 acre, Lot 105, and 0.6 acre, Lot 116, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, near Warrenton, $454,000.

Wilma L. Davidson to Kenneth Davidson and Courtney M. Miller, 3 acres, 4198 Brookfield Drive, near Catlett, $375,000.

NVR Inc. to Alan J. and Cheryl Waugh, 26,240 square feet, Lot 119, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 6527 Bob White Drive, near Warrenton, $768,530.

James B. and Gail M. Gibson to Andrew T. and Starla D. Hill, 1 acre, 8040 Frytown Road, near Warrenton, $565,000.

NVR Inc. to Ibrahim and Nihal Donderici, 0.65 acre, Lot 71, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3959 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $739,250.

Thomas E. Carter to Richard Hoffman and Marcia Robbins, 5.4 acres, Foulks Road, near Catlett, $167,000.

Edward A. and Charlotte A. Wade to Daniel Shields, Lot 81, Phase 2, Green Meadows Subdivision, 9736 Logan Jay Drive, Bealeton, $450,000.


Center District

Benjamin D. and Jean F. Smith to Nathanael T. and Megan L. Knight, Townhouse 49, Phase 1, Highlands of Warrenton Subdivision, 558 Highland Towne Lane, Warrenton, $360,000.

Emanuil and Krasimira Yorgov to Alexander King, Lot 34, Section 2, Highlands of Warrenton Subdivision, 537 Estate Ave., Warrenton, $511,000.

Thaddeus N. Fletcher IV to Sean Recame and Cherie Jolly, 0.45 acre, Lot 124, Bethel Academy Subdivision, 7198 Bethel Drive, near Warrenton, $410,000.


Lee District

David L. and Shannon C. Henderson to Elizabeth C. Flannery, 0.69 acre, Lot 13, Botha Subdivision, 8174 Mangum Court, near Opal, $380,000.

Gregary W. Ochs to Comfort N. Laari, Lot 139, Phase 3, Southcoate Village Subdivision, 10987 Southcoate Village Drive, near Bealeton, $500,000.

Samuel A. Bryant IV to Alfred A. and Robin R. King, Townhouse 69, Phase 4, Bealeton Station Subdivision, 6169 Newton Lane, Bealeton, $295,000.

Patrick R. Schneider to Jose E. Velis and Rosa Medina, 1.6 acres, 6344 Sumerduck Road, near Remington, $400,000.


Marshall District

Verdice and Maria L. Stribling to CZ Real Estate Holdings LLC, 0.5 acre, 708 Gap Run Road, Village of Paris, $260,000.

Justin M. Nicewonger to Ryan V. and Diana M. Jackson, 2.6 acres, 6662 Turning Run Lane, near Orlean, $499,000.

Paula J. Constantini to Jeffrey H. and Lisa S. Pearson, 2 acres, 4444 Free State Road, near Marshall, $340,000.

Christopher M. and Brandy Derby to Charles W. and Tifiny L. Swedensky, 1.5 acres, Lot 1, Straight Division 7210 Della St., near Warrenton, $499,500.


Scott District

Libero Investments LLC, Jad Sarsour as member, to Howard K. and Janet E. Bressant, 2 acres, 4459 Winchester Road, Marshall, $699,000.

Linda W. Baziluik to Catherine Woodward and Richard Benavidez, 1 acre, Lot 5, Springdale Subdivision, 5044 Albrecht Lane, near Warrenton, $462,775.

FS Development LLC, Devin Finan as manager, to NVR Inc., 0.99 acre, Lot 4, and 1 acre, Lot 5, Riley’s Estates Subdivision, Thoroughbred Road, off Riley Road, near New Baltimore, $620,000.

Richard J. Oliver and others to Joseph and Danielle Dedekind, 1 acre, 6367 Rosedale Farm Drive, near Broad Run, $110,000.

Mark Gray and others to P&L 21 LLC, 1 acre, 7354 John Marshall Highway, The Plains, $210,000.

Jason and Briana L. Omohundro to Robert M. and Madison Anderson, Lot 61, Addition to Marstella Estates Subdivision, 7382 Auburn Mill Road, near Warrenton, $575,000.

Rate of new COVID-19 cases falling across Va.

Posted Monday,
January 17, 2022
0 ·
Fauquier averages 123 new COVID-19 cases per day so far this year, but that number has begun to drop.
Vaccinations
74.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 53,135. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.6.%.


66.7%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,486. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.4%.


115,861
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning — up 411 from Friday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
The spread of COVID-19 may have peaked here and across Virginia.

The rate of new cases, hospitalizations and deaths all show declines Monday, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

Fauquier has 277 new cases and 3 more hospitalized patients over the last three days — down from the daily averages so far this year, the health department reported Monday morning.

The health department Monday morning reported 45,738 new cases statewide since Friday morning and 11 more deaths. The state’s fatalities total 15,814 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,397,155 — and increase of 10,842 since Sunday.

Fauquier’s cases total 11,103 since the pandemic started, with 402 hospitalized patients and 96 deaths.

Over the first 16 days of this year, the county has 1,976 new cases — an average of 123 per day, 43 more hospitalizations — averaging 2.6 a day, and 1 death attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,812 infected patients in their beds Monday morning — down 33 from Friday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 88,594 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 24 new cases Monday morning.

The school reported 66 “active cases” Monday — 45 among students and 21 among staff members.

County schools have reported 673 active cases — 485 among students and 188 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

As of last Thursday, the school system had 361 students and 4 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,828 cases, up 230 from Friday morning.

Orange County, 5,683 cases, up 128.

Madison County, 1,661 cases, up 57.

Rappahannock County, 812 cases, up 8.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 33.6 percent statewide and 39 percent in the health district — both down slightly.

3 suspects in custody soon after PNC Bank robbery

Posted Friday,
January 14, 2022
0 ·
Police gather evidence at the PNC Bank branch robbed Friday in Warrenton.
State police joined Warrenton officers and sheriff’s deputies to investigate the robbery.
The collaboration with the sheriff’s office was instrumental in this case.
— Warrenton Police Chief Michael Kochis
Authorities apprehended three suspects soon after the robbery of the PNC Bank at 615 Branch Drive in Warrenton on Friday.

A man entered the bank at 11:54 a.m., “presented a letter and left with cash,” town Police Chief Michael Kochis said at 1:15 p.m.

The suspect did not display a weapon, Chief Kochis said.

Not long after the robbery, police apprehended three suspects in a vehicle on Interstate 66 near Manassas, Officer Chai Fuller wrote in a press release Friday night.

Warrenton Police identified the suspected robber as Steve Jamal Smith, 27, of Washington, D.C. Charged with robbery, Mr. Smith remained in the Fauquier jail Friday night, Officer Fuller said.

Police also arrested one of other men in vehicle, Sherman Edward Smith, 29, of Falls Church, “on an outstanding misdemeanor warrant for assault out of Alexandria,” Officer Fuller said.

Police did not release the identity of the third person in the vehicle, whom they did not arrest, according to Officer Fuller.

Nor did authorities release the amount of cash taken.

“The collaboration with the sheriff’s office was instrumental in this case,” Chief Kochis said. He also thanked Prince William County and Virginia State Police.

Town officers, sheriff’s deputies and state police remained on the scene early Friday afternoon.

There were no injuries.


County has 113 new COVID cases, 3 more hospitalized

Posted Friday,
January 14, 2022
0 ·
Stock Photo
Fauquier has averaged 130 new COVID-19 cases and 3 more hospitalizations per day so far this year.
Vaccinations
74.5%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 53,070. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.4.%.


66.6%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,411. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.3%.


115,450
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Friday morning — up 204 from Thursday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 113 new COVID-19 cases and 3 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

As the spike continues, the health department Friday morning reported 17,219 new cases statewide since Thursday and 18 more deaths. The state’s fatalities total 15,803 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,351,417.

Fauquier’s cases total 10,826 since the pandemic started, with 399 hospitalized patients and 96 deaths.

Over the first 12 days of this year, the county has 1,699 new cases — an average of 130 per day, 40 more hospitalizations — averaging 3 a day, and 1 death attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,845 infected patients in their beds Friday morning — down 49 from Thursday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 87,521 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 42 “active cases” Friday — 31 among students and 11 among staff members.

County schools have reported 649 active cases — 471 among students and 178 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

As of Thursday, the school system had 361 students and 4 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,598 cases, up 105 from Thursday morning.

Orange County, 5,555 cases, up 82.

Madison County, 1,604 cases, up 25.

Rappahannock County, 804 cases, up 5.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 35.8 percent statewide and 41.5 percent in the health district — both up slightly.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
January 14, 2022
0 ·

House Republicans elect Webert as majority whip

Posted Thursday,
January 13, 2022
0 ·
Contributed Photo
Redistricting will put Del. Michael Webert and Del. Dave LaRock, both Republicans, in the new 30th District for the 2023 election.
It’s an honor to be elected by my colleagues to this position of leadership.
— Del. Michael Webert
Del. Michael Webert (R-18th/Marshall) on Wednesday was elected by his caucus to serve as majority whip in the Republican-led Virginia House of Delegates.

Del. Webert, a Republican who represents most of Fauquier, all of Rappahannock and parts of Culpeper and Warren counties, will serve in a leadership role for the first time in his 10-year career as a state legislator.

“It’s an honor to be elected by my colleagues to this position of leadership,” he said in a news release. "Now more than ever, we need strong leadership in the Republican majority to ensure that we are keeping our promises to voters and delivering the conservative agenda we ran on."

A farmer, Del. Webert won reelection to his seat last year, defeating Rappahannock County Democrat Dr. Doug Ward by a wide margin.

House Republicans vote privately to elect leadership, according to Webert spokesperson Andrew Loposser, making it unclear how many members of the caucus supported him as majority whip.

Del. Todd Gilbert (R-Shenandoah County) took over as Peaker of the House. Gov.-elect Glen Youngkin (R) will take office Saturday.

Virginia’s recently completed redistricting will put Del. Webert and Del. Dave LaRock (R-33rd/Hamilton) in the new 30th District, which covers northern Fauquier and western Loudoun County.

That sets up a potential conflict between the two Republican legislators in 2023, when voters will elect all 100 House members and the 40 state senators. Del. LaRock, a building contractor, has served eight years in the House of Delegates.

“I’m paired with [Marshall Del.] Michael J. Webert (R-18)—good friend, good delegate,” Del. LaRock said in an interview with LoudounNow. “I’ve talked with him on the phone, and we’ll try to figure out what’s best for us, and the Commonwealth and the people we serve.”

County has 140 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Thursday,
January 13, 2022
0 ·
Thursday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
74.5%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 53,027. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.3.%.


66.5%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,382. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.2%.


115,246
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning — up 209 from Wednesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 140 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

As the spike continues, the health department Thursday morning reported 18,942 new cases statewide since Wednesday and 35 more deaths. The state’s fatalities total 15,785 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,334,198.

Fauquier’s cases total 10,723 since the pandemic started, with 396 hospitalized patients and 96 deaths.

Over the first 12 days of this year, the county has 1,586 new cases — an average of 132 per day, 37 more hospitalizations — averaging 3 a day, and 1 death attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,894 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning — down 5 from Wednesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 87,024 since the pandemic started.

Reopened Monday morning after the winter break and a week of closures because of weather, Fauquier County Public Schools reported 15 new cases Thursday. The school system has 21 “active cases” — 16 among students and 5 among staff members.

County schools have reported 568 active cases — 396 among students and 172 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,493 cases, up 151 from Wednesday morning.

Orange County, 5,473 cases, up 95.

Madison County, 1,579 cases, up 16.

Rappahannock County, 799 cases, up 5.

As of Thursday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 35.6 percent statewide and 41.2 percent in the health district.

4-H starts Eleanor Hazel After-School Program

Posted Thursday,
January 13, 2022
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
January 13, 2022
0 ·

Divided government returns to Va. legislature

Posted Thursday,
January 13, 2022
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Ned Oliver
Virginia House members take the oath of office Wednesday at the state Capitol in Richmond.
We’ve got a lot of money in the state right now. We have a fiscal and moral obligation to help struggling families . . . . That obligation starts with reducing the taxes they pay.
— Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach), House Appropriations Committee chairman
2022 General Assembly
• Convened: Wednesday, Jan. 12

• Adjourns: Saturday, Feb. 27

• Website: virginiageneralassembly.gov


Fauquier’s legislators


• Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel
(R-27th/Upperville).

• Del. Michael Webert
(R-18th/Marshall).

• Del. Elizabeth Guzman
(D-31st/Woodbridge).

• Del. Phillip Scott
(R-88th/Fredericksburg).
By Graham Moomaw
The Virginia Mercury

Divided government returned to Richmond on Wednesday as the 2022 General Assembly session began with House Republicans and Senate Democrats laying out different visions for what they want to do over the next 60 days.

Assuming power after winning back a GOP majority in last year’s elections, new House Speaker Todd Gilbert (R-Shenandoah County) touched on many of the same themes Republicans campaigned on, promising to push for lower taxes, a tougher approach to crime and better schools.

“The reason we think we’re here in this position today, in the majority, is because we listened to Virginians’ concerns,” said Del. Gilbert, a 51-year-old lawyer and former prosecutor who has served in the House for 15 years.

But even with Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) set to be sworn into office Saturday as the state’s first Republican governor since 2014, the GOP agenda depends on what the Democratic-controlled Senate will agree to.

“We made generational progress in the past two years,” Sen. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond) said at a virtual news conference, vowing to block attempts to roll back the state’s efforts to mitigate climate change and transition away from fossil fuels. “And part of our agenda will be to protect that progress going forward.”

With both parties insisting they’ll focus on “kitchen-table issues,” Senate Democrats said they’ll prioritize paid family leave, making child care more affordable and addressing teacher shortages and other pandemic-era struggles in public education.

One big-ticket item on the legislature’s education docket will be a proposed expansion of public charter schools, a priority for Mr. Youngkin that remains uncertain given longstanding local resistance to alternatives skeptics warn could siphon funding from traditional schools.

“Past history has shown that the thing that charter schools are most adept at is draining public school money,” said Senate Majority Leader Dick Saslaw (D-Fairfax). “The results on testing don’t justify draining those funds.”

Republicans argue Virginia lags far behind peer states in the adoption of charter schools, which they’re pitching as a way to bring innovation and options to the existing public-school system.

“They are public schools,” said Del. Glenn Davis (R-Virginia Beach), the incoming chairman of the House Education Committee. “There will not be any funds utilized that go to a charter school that are not educating a public-school child.”

The two chambers and Mr. Youngkin seem to broadly agree on boosting education funding and raising teacher pay, but House Republicans made clear their agenda will also include more hot-button educational issues. For example, Del. Davis said the GOP will again introduce a bill to ban so-called critical race theory and mandate race-blind admissions at Virginia’s governor’s schools, proposals sure to spark debate over racial inequities and how education policy should address them.

Tax relief also appears to be another area with some potential for bipartisan accord, despite some differences in philosophy. House Republicans said they’ll seek direct tax rebates of $300 per individual filer and $600 per couple, as well as doubling the standard deduction for state income taxes.

“We’ve got a lot of money in the state right now,” said Del. Barry Knight (R-Virginia Beach), the new chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. “We have a fiscal and moral obligation to help struggling families. …That obligation starts with reducing the taxes they pay.”

Sen. Saslaw said he disagrees with the across-the-board approach, preferring instead more targeted tax credits that could benefit the neediest Virginians.

“You’re going to wind up giving a lot of tax credit money away to people that don’t need it,” he said. “I don’t need a tax cut.”

Mr. Youngkin also campaigned on ending the state’s tax on groceries, an idea departing Gov. Ralph Northam partially incorporated in his final budget proposal.

Democrats in both chambers say their goal is to protect the sweeping changes they’ve made over the last two years, including expanding voting access, raising the minimum wage, ending the death penalty, tightening gun laws and protecting the environment.

Del. Gilbert said his caucus is “acutely aware” of the limitations of dealing with a Democratic Senate.

“That doesn’t mean we won’t be boldly pushing forth ideas,” he said.

Mr. Youngkin, who will have to deal with a politically divided legislature through at least 2023, has not yet rolled out a detailed legislative agenda. The new governor will take the oath of office Saturday.

Gladys Maude Dick

Posted Wednesday,
January 12, 2022
0 ·

Cynthia Anne Andes

Posted Wednesday,
January 12, 2022
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
January 12, 2022
0 ·

County has 122 new COVID cases and 96th death

Posted Wednesday,
January 12, 2022
0 ·
Virginia has a record 19,836 new COVID-19 cases, the state health department reports Wednesday morning.
Vaccinations
74.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 52,989. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.2.%.


66.5%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,348. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.2%.


115,037
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday morning — up 181 from Monday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 122 new COVID-19 cases and its 96th death attributed to the virus, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

As the spike continues, the health department Wednesday morning reported a record 19,836 new cases statewide since Tuesday and 35 more deaths. The state’s fatalities total 15,750 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,315,256.

Fauquier’s cases total 10,583 since the pandemic started, with 395 hospitalized patients — up 1 Wednesday.

Over the first 11 days of this year, the county has 1,444 new cases — an average of 131 per day, 36 more hospitalizations — averaging 3.2 a day, and 1 death attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,899 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning — up 54 from Tuesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 86,495 since the pandemic started.

Reopened Monday morning after the winter break and a week of closures because of weather, Fauquier County Public Schools 6 new cases Wednesday — 4 among students and 2 among staff members. County schools have reported 553 active cases — 384 among students and 169 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,342 cases, up 132 from Tuesday morning.

Orange County, 5,378 cases, up 82.

Madison County, 1,563 cases, up 24.

Rappahannock County, 794 cases, up 3.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 35.8 percent statewide and 41.1 percent in the health district — both down slightly.



Jeremy Falls would serve as Fauquier’s next sheriff

Posted Tuesday,
January 11, 2022
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Lt. Col. Jeremy Falls with wife Crystal at the sheriff’s oath of office ceremony in 2019.
A Marshall native, Jeremy Falls has 25 years of law enforcement experience.
Jeremy A. Falls
• Age: 50

• Home: Near Warrenton.

• Work: Lieutenant colonel (chief deputy), Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office, starting Jan. 5.

• Salary: $126,000

• Experience: Fauquier sheriff’s lieutenant colonel, January 2018 to present; major, FCSO, January 2016 to January 2018; captain, Fairfax County Sheriff’s Office, with experience in detention center, civil process, court security, human resources, training and administration, 1996-2016.

• Military: Five years in U.S. Army as intelligence analyst and paratrooper, stationed in South Korea and Fort Bragg, N.C.

• Education: Bachelor’s degree, human resources and leadership studies, University of Richmond, 2007; master’s certificate, University of Virginia, 2014; master’s certificate, American University, 2008; Fauquier High School, 1989.

• Family: Wife Crystal and two sons.

• Hobbies: Hunting and watching sports.
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Assuming the Virginia Senate approves Sheriff Bob Mosier’s appointment to the new governor’s cabinet, Fauquier immediately would get a new law enforcement chief.

Lt. Col. Jeremy A. Falls, 50, would rise to county sheriff, according to the Code of Virginia.

A Marshall native, Lt. Col. Falls has 25 years of law enforcement experience. He joined the Fauquier agency as a major in January 2016, when Sheriff Mosier took office, and rose to lieutenant colonel three years ago.

The board of supervisors Thursday will consider a resolution directing the county attorney to petition the circuit court for a Nov. 8 special election, in which Fauquier voters would elect a sheriff to serve the balance of the four-year term, through 2023.

Asked if he would run in the special election, Lt. Col. Falls responded by text Tuesday afternoon: “Absolutely!”

Things have moved quickly since Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) on Monday announced his nomination of Sheriff Mosier as Virginia’s next Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security.

“Upon his confirmation, I will take the oath of office to be the Interim-Sheriff of Fauquier County,” Lt. Col. Falls wrote in an email to his staff at 12:15 p.m. Monday. “While change can be a time of uncertainty for many, I want to assure you that there will be no immediate major changes in the operations of how we conduct business.

“I want to emphasize that the well-being of the men and women of the Sheriff’s Office and your families is my top priority. I will have an open-door policy and want to hear from you when you need to speak to me.

“I want the Sheriff’s Office to continue to be the premier full-service Sheriff’s Office that it has become, setting the standard for jurisdictions to follow. We will be committed to those we serve, adapting to change while focusing on our values.”

The sheriff’s office this year has the equivalent of 121.5 full-time employees and a $22.4-million budget. The state funds about $10 million of that budget, with the balance coming from county taxpayers and revenue the office generates.

The sheriff oversees patrol, criminal investigations, court security/civil process, adult detention center, emergency communications, school resource officer, records and training units, along with supporting administrative functions.

A “constitutional office” in Virginia, elected sheriffs serve four-year terms.

Sheriff Mosier (R ) won his first election in 2015 and re-election in 2019.

Lt. Col. Falls, who lives near Warrenton, worked 20 years in the Fairfax County Sheriff’s Office before joining Sheriff Mosier’s command staff. He served five years in the U.S. Army as an intelligence analyst and paratrooper.

The 1989 Fauquier High School graduate earned a bachelor’s degree in human resources and leadership studies at the University of Richmond and master’s certificates from the University of Virginia and American University.

An FBI National Academy graduate, he continues to work toward a master’s degree in public administration from George Mason University.

“Our future is bright and I fully expect to have the community’s support, as well as support from the Board of Supervisors and other local, state and federal government agencies,” Lt. Col. Falls wrote in his email to the sheriff’s office staff. “I am honored to have this opportunity and look forward to us continuing on this bright path together.

“I extend my appreciation to Sheriff Mosier for the opportunities he has afforded me. My best wishes to he and Mrs. Mosier on their exciting new journey.”

Contact “Lou” Emerson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-270-1845.



Fauquier sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
January 11, 2022
0 ·

County has 127 new COVID cases, 5 more hospitalized

Posted Tuesday,
January 11, 2022
0 ·
In the first 10 days of this year, Fauquier has averaged 132 new cases and 3.5 more hospitalizations per day.
Vaccinations
74.3%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 52,946. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.1.%.


66.4%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,326. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.1%.


114,856
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning — up 290 from Monday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 127 new COVID-19 cases and 5 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

As the spike continues, the health department Tuesday morning reported 16,681 new cases since Monday and 44 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,715 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,295,420.

Fauquier’s cases total 10,461 since the pandemic started, with 393 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

Over the first 10 days of this year, the county has 1,324 new cases — an average of 132 per day — and 35 more hospitalizations — averaging 3.5 a day — but no new deaths attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,845 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning — up 164 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 86,033 since the pandemic started.

Reopened Monday morning after the winter break and a week of closures because of weather, Fauquier County Public Schools reported no new cases Tuesday. County schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,210 cases, up 71 from Monday morning, and its 97th death attributed to COVID-19.

Orange County, 5,296 cases, up 52.

Madison County, 1,539 cases, up 25.

Rappahannock County, 791 cases, up 3.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 36 percent statewide and 41.2 percent in the health district — both rising.

Herbert “Glen” Kines

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·

Sheriff Mosier nominated for Virginia cabinet post

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Sheriff Bob Mosier started his career in law enforcement as a Manassas Park police dispatcher.
Bob shares my vision for innovating how our law enforcement officers build trust and engage in their communities they serve by building bridges with local leaders to reduce crime and keep Virginians safe.
— Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin
Robert Patrick Mosier
• Age: 58

• Home: Warrenton

• Work: Fauquier County sheriff, 2016 to present.

• Experience: Senior associate, Obsidian Solutions Group LLC, contractor for U.S. Department of Defense Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, 2012-15; senior police advisor, State Department in Iraq, 2011-12, and in U.S., 2007-11; vice president of investigations, International Justice Mission, 1998-2007; law enforcement technical advisor, DynCorp International, 2001-07; special deputy, Culpeper County Sheriff’s Office, 1998-2015; patrol division commander, worked way up from deputy, Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office, 1988-96; officer, Manassas Park Police Department, 1983-1988.

• Education: Bachelor’s degree, criminal justice, Aspen University, Denver expected completion this year; associate’s degree, police science, Northern Virginia Community College; Thomas Edison High School, Franconia, 1981.

• Organizations: Fauquier Historical Society board member, Boys & Girls Club of Fauquier, International Association of Police Chiefs, Virginia Homicide Investigators Association, Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies and others.

• Family: Wife, Cindy; three adult children and seven grandchildren.
Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin today announced his nomination of Fauquier Sheriff Robert P. “Bob” Mosier as Virginia’s next Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security.

“Sheriff Mosier will play an important role in keeping our communities safe,” Mr. Youngkin said in press release Monday night. “We will get to work on this key priority by fully funding and raising pay for our law enforcement officers. Together, we will protect qualified immunity, and on Day One fire the Parole Board.

“Bob shares my vision for innovating how our law enforcement officers build trust and engage in their communities they serve by building bridges with local leaders to reduce crime and keep Virginians safe,” said the governor-elect, who will take the oath of office Saturday.

A native Virginian, Sheriff Mosier, 58, has 30 years of experience local, federal and international law enforcement. He began as a police dispatcher at the age of 19 and at 21 became a Manassas Park patrol officer.

In 2015, the Republican won election as Fauquier’s sheriff, getting re-elected four years later.

He served as a sheriff’s deputy from 1988 to 1996 in Fauquier. Sheriff Mosier then worked with the International Justice Mission, a human rights organization, as Director of Investigations working in Asia, Middle and Near East, Africa, and Latin America.

He later served as a senior representative for a U.S. Department of Defense law enforcement program, providing daily oversight of all administrative, logistical, operational, and training requirements for 300 law enforcement professionals. Following that service, he became a GS-15 Deputy Senior Executive Police Advisor for the Iraq Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs with the U.S. Department of State, overseeing 150 Senior Police Advisors. Most recently, he supported the U.S. Department of Defense as the Senior Associate for Law Enforcement Operations with Obsidian Solutions Group.

Gov. Ralph Northam appointed Sheriff Moser to the Criminal Justice Services Board in 2021 and to the Substance Abuse Services Council in 2020.

The General Assembly, which convenes Wednesday, Jan. 12, in Richmond, will consider confirming Sheriff Moser for the post in Mr. Younkin’s cabinet.

Sheriff Mosier would succeed Brian Moran, who has served as Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s and Gov. Northam’s Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security. Mr. Moran last year earned $191,841 that position, which oversees 10 agencies, including Virginia State Police, the Department of Corrections and the Virginia Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority.

Gallo appointed interim school board member

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·
Fauquier’s school board selected Vincent E. “Vinny” Gallo among 14 applicants for appointment as Scott District’s interim representative.
Vincent E. “Vinny” Gallo
• Age: 30

• Home: Near New Baltimore

• Position: Interim Scott District member of Fauquier school board.

• Work: Senior safety manager, CPG, Ashburn, November to present.

• Experience: Senior safety consultant, VRSA, 2019-2021; senior risk & safety analyst, City of Manassas, 2017-19; compliance safety and health officer, Virginia Department of Labor and Industry, 2014-17; senor corrections officer, Virginia Department of Corrections, 2011-14; public works employee, Department of Defense at Fort A.P. Hill, 2010-11.

• Education: Bachelor’s degree, health science, Old Dominion University, 2019.

• Family: Wife Rebecca and two children.
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Fauquier’s school board Monday night selected a 30-year-old father and risk management specialist to fill the vacant Scott District seat on an interim basis.

Vincent E. “Vinny” Gallo will succeed Suzanne Sloane, who resigned Dec. 15 after six years on the board. Ms. Sloane and her husband moved to Harrisonburg.

The board interviewed 14 applicants behind closed doors from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Chairwoman Donna Grove (Cedar Run District) said.

“I saw the open call (for applicants), and local government is something I’ve always been interested in,” Mr. Gallo said in a brief phone conversation Monday night.

The father of two children in county schools, Mr. Gallo praised the work of the board and the staff.

“My background is in occupational safety and health,” he said. “Fauquier County has done a great job ensuring safety.”

But, no particular issue prompted him to seek the appointment, Mr. Gallo said. He pledged to focus on issues that constituents bring to the board.

“We had 14 impressive, passionate candidates,” Stephanie Litter-Reber (Lee) said before the board’s 4-0 vote to appoint Mr. Gallo. “This was not an easy decision.”

Mr. Gallo graduated from Riverbend High School in Spotsylvania County and Old Dominion University in Norfolk with a bachelor’s degree in health science in 2019.

He works as senior safety manager at CPG, a data center company in Ashburn. He has worked for state and local government as well as in the private sector.

After taking the oath of office, Mr. Gallo will join the board for its annual planning summit Wednesday at Marriott Ranch near Hume.

He will serve until the Nov. 8 special election, when Scott District voters will select a school board member to serve the balance of the four-year term through 2023.

Fauquier school board members earn annual stipends of $12,000. The chairman earns $14,000 and the vice chairman earns $13,300.

97-acre White Marsh land in Bealeton sells for $4 MM

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·
Adjacent to Liberty High School (right), the White Marsh property in 2010 got county approval for a large, mixed-use development. The 97 acres sold recently for $4 million.
A Leesburg company recently paid $4 million for 97 acres, previously planned for a mixed-use development along Route 17, just north of Liberty High School at Bealeton.

In 2010, the board of supervisors approved the “White Marsh” development plan for 311,000 square feet of commercial space, 331 dwellings and a 130-bed assisted living center. But, the plan has remained dormant.

A Falls Church company in 2015 bought the property for $3.2 million.

For tax purposes, the county values the property at $4.9 million.

With agents Ron Zabriskie and Stephan Karbelk representing the seller, Century 21 Commercial New Millennium had listed the property for sale at $4.95 million.

The transaction tops the most recent list of Fauquier real estate sales, which also include:

• 12 acres in the 17/66 Business Park at Marshall that sold for $2.6 million.

• A convenience store on 0.8 acre at the southwest corner of Routes 17 and 28 in Bealeton that sold for $2.48 million. A 7-Eleven with Exxon fuel pumps occupies the building, across Route 28 from Sheetz.

153 acres of farmland at Delaplane that sold for $1.6 million. Fauquier County holds a conservation easement on the Marshall District property.

81 acres with a one-bedroom apartment above a three-bay garage near Orlean that sold for $1 million.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Dec. 29, 2021, to Jan. 4, 2022:


Cedar Run District

Beverlee K. Drucker and Heather E. Armstrong to David H. Nguyen and Lillian Y. Kim, 0.98 acre, 9140 Meetze Road, near Warrenton, $397,500.

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as manager, to NVR Inc., 0.58 acre, Lot 113, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, near Warrenton, $232,000.

Cary A. Rodrigues to Garrett Broady, 9274 Prospect Ave., Catlett, $368,000.

Jacob D. Tracy to Megan Buesseler, 5 aces, 14046 Blackwell’s Mill Road, Goldvein, $590,000.


Center District

Horner Street Associates Inc. to Fauquier Habitat for Humanity, 0.73 acre, 35 Horner St., Warrenton, $650,000.

Beatrice J. Gillen to Kimberly Ristedt, Lot 6, Fletcher Subdivision, 35 S. Chestnut St., Warrenton, $258,000.

Robert S. Burns, trustee, to Jeremy Jens and Dina Lyon, Unit 79, Phase 20, Villas at the Ridges Condominiums, 214 Onyx Way, Warrenton, $446,521.


Lee District

Rushmark White Marsh LLC, Patrick Kearney as managing member, to Simba White Marsh LLC (Leesburg), 17.2 acres, 16.8 acres, 59.9 acres and 3 acres, 10685 and 10751 Old Marsh Road, Bealeton, $4 million.

Quarles Petroleum Inc. to Niki Riverside LP (Hermosa Beach, Calif.), 0.8 acre, Marsh Road and Catlett Road, Bealeton, $2,487,850.

Larry L. Nolen and Marian G. Graham to Larry E. and Betty K. Sims, 8.9 acres, Lot 29-C, Cool Spring Estate, Rt. 17, near Goldvein, $145,000.

Patricia A. Wines to Marleny S. Aguilar, 0.54 acre, Lot 35, Section B2, Fox Meade Subdivision, 6644 Forbes Place East, Bealeton, $344,500.

Mintbrook Developers LLC, Russell Marks as manager, to NVR Inc., 0.26 acre, Lot 147, Phase A, Section 3-B, Clarke Street, Mintbrook Subdivision, Bealeton, $126,200.

Federal National Mortgage Association to Julio C.A. Chavez, 2.4 acres, 14160 Warrenton Road (Rt. 17), Goldvein, $406,000.

John L. Owens Jr. and Betty L. Hawkins to Mercedes A. Dionoicio, 24,543 square feet, Lot 7, Section A, Fox Meade Subdivision, 6552 Schoolhouse Road, Bealeton, $359,000.

Anthony E. and Jennifer C. Doores to Vilma C. Mendoza and Cecilia J. Hernandez, Lot 69, Section F, Meadowbrooke Subdivision, 6804 Crescent Place, Bealeton, $398,900.


Marshall District

17/66 LLC, James L. Jessup Jr. as manager, to Parkway Crossing LLC, 12 acres, Lot 2-R, 17/66 Business Park, off Whiting Road, Marshall, $2,616,975.

Hill Crest Associations LC, Connie R. Hall as manager, to Margaret A. Dewhirst and Scott A. Barboza, 153 acres, Delaplane Grade Road, Delaplane, $1,615,950.

Nicholas and Abbie D. Succop to Lisa J. and Robert T. Jones Jr., 4019 Rectortown Road, Marshall, $549,998.

Michale A. and Nicole V. Sponaugle to James P. Baltimore IV and Evelyn R. Akers, 81.3 acres, 12018 Deerfield Lane, near Orlean, $1,000,000.


Scott District

Zuna Real Estate LLC, Mahmood A. Nasir as sole member, to Merlin and Trevor W. Cross, 5 acres, Lot 1, Kelly Woods Subdivision, 5118 Timber Lane, near Warrenton, $675,000.

Paul W. Rice to Chad B. Frederick, 1.3 acres, 6773 Riley Road, near New Baltimore, $365,000.

Fenton Chase Buildings Inc., James A. and Dorothy J. Alt as members, to Angelo J. and Randilee Giamusso, 0.93 acre, Lot 5, Phase 2-B, Fenton Chase Subdivision, 3279 Brady Court, near Warrenton, $864,201.

Ashley T. Martin to Sean M. and Alexis L. Doherty, 5.2 acres, Lot 4, Pond Mountain Estates, 5753 Georgetown Road, Broad Run, $675,000.


Northam moves to help Va.’s struggling hospitals

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·
In one of his last acts as governor, Ralph Northam announces the limited state of emergency Monday.
Health care workers and hospitals are exhausted, and they are again facing increasing numbers of patients, affecting their ability to provide care. These steps will help ease the strain, giving medical professionals more flexibility to care for people. Ultimately, the best thing everyone can do for our hospitals and their staff is to get vaccinated.
— Gov. Ralph Northam
As one of his last acts in office, Gov. Ralph Northam on Monday declared a limited state of emergency to increase Virginia’s hospital capacity and support healthcare workers responding to COVID-19.

The 30-day emergency order directs the State Health Commissioner to waive normal bed licensing requirements, allows hospitals to increase their licensed bed capacity, and mandates increased coordination between hospitals and local medical services agencies.

The declaration is based on modeling that suggests the virus will peak in the next few weeks, Gov. Northam said.

Statewide hospitalizations hit a record high Friday of 3,681, with a one-day record of 26,175 new cases Saturday. The prior record was 19,506.

As of Monday, the seven-day case average is a record 16,861. The January 2021 peak was just over 6,000. Gov. Northam said ICU hospitalizations have more than doubled since Dec. 1.
“Health care workers and hospitals are exhausted, and they are again facing increasing numbers of patients, affecting their ability to provide care,” the governor said. “These steps will help ease the strain, giving medical professionals more flexibility to care for people. Ultimately, the best thing everyone can do for our hospitals and their staff is to get vaccinated.”

Gov. Northam said Virginia's vaccination rate is one of the best in the nation, with more than 90 percent of state residents having received at least one shot, but the Omicron variant is highly contagious and is hitting the unvaccinated hard.

"The overwhelming majority of individuals hospitalized have not been vaccinated against COVID-19," Gov. Northam said. "In fact, one hospital company reported last week that 97 percent of COVID-19 patients relying on ventilators are not vaccinated."

The governor's order allows providers with an active out-of-state license to practice in Virginia; authorizes experienced physician assistants to practice without a written supervisory agreement; increases provider-to-patient ratios and provides certain liability protections to health care workers who act in good faith to protect patients. It also increases flexibility in the transfer of patients to state-operated psychiatric hospitals, which have seen dangerously-high census levels since the pandemic began.

Gov. Northam said he and his wife are moving back to Norfolk this weekend as Republican Glenn Youngkin, a former business executive from McLean, takes office Saturday as Virginia's 74th governor.

What kind of governor will Glenn Youngkin be?

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·

416 more COVID-19 cases since Friday in county

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·
Virginia has 57,703 new COVID-19 cases in three days, the state health department reports Monday morning.
Vaccinations
74.3%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 52,903. Statewide, the rate stands at 78.%.


66.4%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,28
96. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.1%.


114,566
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning — up 9,640 from one week earlier.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 416 new COVID-19 cases and 10 more hospitalized patients since Friday morning, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday.

As the spike continues, the health department Monday morning reported 57,703 new cases since Friday and 10 more deaths statewide. Cases increased 15,463 since Sunday morning. Virginia deaths total 15,671 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,278,739.

The health department had last updated publicly-available statistics the morning of Friday, Jan. 7.

Fauquier’s cases total 10,334 since the pandemic started, with 388 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

Over the first 9 days of this year, the county has 1,197 new cases — an average of 133 per day — and 30 more hospitalizations — averaging 3 a day — but no new deaths attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,681 infected patients in their beds Monday morning — up 130 from Sunday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 85,399 since the pandemic started.

Reopened Monday morning after the winter break and a week of closures because of weather, Fauquier County Public Schools reported no new cases. County schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 9,139 cases, up 399 from Friday morning.

Orange County, 5,244 cases, up 201.

Madison County, 1,514 cases, up 59.

Rappahannock County, 788 cases, up 28.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 35.6 percent statewide and 39 percent in the health district — both rising.



Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·

Dominion finally gets OK for big smart meter rollout

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Sarah Vogelsong
Dominion will spend $198.3 million to install smart meters at all but about 300,000 Virginia customer location by 2023. It plans to complete the conversion in 2024.
we’ll be able to offer all of our customers faster storm service connections, greater information and options to manage their usage and bill and streamline the integration of distributed energy resources like solar panels and battery storage at their homes.
— Augustus Johnson, Dominion’s director of electric distribution grid solutions
By Sarah Vogelsong
The Virginia Mercury

In Dominion Energy’s quest to get regulators to approve the large-scale rollout of smart meters to Virginia customers, the fourth time was the charm.

Friday, after three earlier rejections, the State Corporation Commission signed off on a proposal by the electric utility to replace roughly 1.1 million existing meters with newer technology that can allow customers to adjust their energy usage based on real-time data.

The project, which was included in the utility’s latest Grid Transformation Plan, will cost $198.3 million and bring Dominion close to a full deployment of smart meters in Virginia by 2023. Replacement of the final 250,000 to 300,000 existing non-smart meters will be proposed as part of the company’s next plan, which would lead to full deployment by 2024.

Dominion has 22,000 customers in Fauquier.

Augustus Johnson, Dominion’s director of electric distribution grid solutions, called smart meters — formally known as advanced metering infrastructure — a “fundamental building block” of the utility’s grid transformation efforts.

With them, “we’ll be able to offer all of our customers faster storm service connections, greater information and options to manage their usage and bill and streamline the integration of distributed energy resources like solar panels and battery storage at their homes,” Mr. Johnson said.

Dominion has been vying for SCC approval of its plans to deploy smart meters across its entire Virginia territory since the General Assembly approved the Grid Transformation and Security Act in 2018.

The utility has contended that as it modernizes the electric grid, smart meters will provide the data needed to integrate an increasing number of distributed energy resources like rooftop solar panels and electric vehicles. In addition to letting the utility track customers’ energy use electronically, smart meters can provide information to customers themselves, allowing them to adjust their usage and potentially take advantage of innovative electric rates designed to drive down use at times of peak demand.

Dominion has been steadily replacing its older meters, known as automated meter reading or AMR devices, since 2008. As of the end of November, it had deployed 1.2 million within the Virginia system, with recent efforts focusing on Petersburg, parts of Southside and Hampton Roads, and the eastern portion of Richmond.

But regulators have been reluctant to sign off on the costs of a coordinated system-wide deployment.

The SCC twice denied smart meter proposals in Dominion’s Grid Transformation plans and in April 2020 again rejected the utility’s request to reconsider its latest denial. In a formal order, the commissioners said they believed the potential benefits of Dominion’s proposed smart meter rollout were “too speculative and uncertain for the commission to choose to approve such a large expenditure at this time, the large costs of which impact Dominion’s customers.”

In the most recent plan approved by the SCC Friday, environmental and consumer protection nonprofit Appalachian Voices had argued that regulators should condition their approval of the smart meter rollout on the utility taking several other steps, such as offering customers a rebate for reducing electricity usage on days when demand has hit a critical peak.

The commission turned down that suggestion, however and approved the rollout plan as a whole, pointing to other steps Dominion has taken to justify a broader deployment.

In particular, the SCC cited the utility’s new time-of-use rate, a type of electric rate designed to incentivize customers to decrease their electricity usage at times of peak demand and shift energy-intensive activities like vehicle charging to off-peak times. Not only does Dominion now offer an experimental TOU rate, said the commission, but it has “provided a timeline for system-wide implementation” of such rates.

The commission had previously criticized the utility for not incorporating time-of-use rates into its smart meter plans, saying that Dominion had “failed to submit a comprehensive proposal” to roll them out across its territory even while asking customers to pick up the costs of smart meters.

Other reasons proffered by the SCC in support of their approval this Friday included declining vendor support for existing meters, as well as that technology’s “functional limitations.”

Donald L. Hume

Posted Monday,
January 10, 2022
0 ·

Shots fired into home Sunday in Warrenton

Posted Sunday,
January 9, 2022
0 ·
Photo/Warrenton PD
Warrenton police say this car may have been involved when someone fired a gun at a house just before 9 a.m. Sunday.
Warrenton police seek information about shots fired into a home Sunday morning.

“Today, at approximately 8:50 a.m., officers were called to the 100 block of Old Mill Lane for a report of someone shooting into a residence,” Officer Chai Fuller wrote in a press release Sunday night.

“Detectives are currently investigating this incident. Preliminary information indicates that this does not appear to be a random act of violence,” Officer Fuller wrote.

The police department released an image of light colored sedan that “may be involved in this incident.”

The incident took place in the Oliver City area, just south of East Lee Street and Walker Drive. There were no injuries.

Police ask anyone who may have any information about the vehicle and/or the incident to contact Detective Mike Gemmell at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-347-1107, ext. 232.


William J. Pfamatter

Posted Saturday,
January 8, 2022
0 ·

Allegedly intoxicated driver hits sheriff’s vehicles

Posted Friday,
January 7, 2022
0 ·
Photos/Fauquier County Sheriff’s Office
Troy Terrell of Linden allegedly crashed his car into these two sheriff’s SUVs in the Cedar Lee Middle School parking lot in Bealeton.
Bane received treatment at an emergency veterinary clinic.
Charged with DUI, Troy Terrell remained in the county jail Friday night.
The suspect’s vehicle.
An intoxicated driver ran off Marsh Road in Bealeton and struck two Fauquier sheriff’s vehicles — one of them a K-9 unit — Thursday night, according to authorities.

Inside the sheriff’s vehicle, K-9 Bane suffered “of non-life-threatening injuries” and received treatment at an emergency veterinary clinic, Lt. Steve Lewis wrote in a press release Friday night.

The county 9-1-1 center received the first report of the incident at 9:44 p.m. Jan. 6.

“On January 6, sheriff’s deputies were preparing for an investigation in the parking lot of Cedar Lee Middle School located in the 11100 block of Marsh Road,” Lt. Lewis said. “While deputies were outside their vehicles, a small sedan drove off Marsh Road and drove over the curb and struck two sheriff’s office patrol vehicles in the parking lot. The operator was identified as Troy Terrell, 44, of Linden.”

Virginia State Police arrested Mr. Terrell and charged him with driving under the influence.”

He remained in the county jail without bond Friday night.

No deputy suffered an injury, Lt. Lewis said.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
January 7, 2022
0 ·

County has 142 new COVID cases, 2 more hospitalized

Posted Friday,
January 7, 2022
0 ·
Fauquier has averaged 111 new COVID-19 cases and 3 more hospitalized patients per day so far this year.
Vaccinations
74%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 52,695. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.7.%.


66.2%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,145. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.8%.


113,462
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning — up 225 from Wednesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 142 new COVID-19 cases and 2 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

As the surge continues, the health department Friday morning reported a one-day record of 18,309 new cases since Thursday morning and 9 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,651 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,221,036.

Fauquier’s cases total 9,918 since the pandemic started, with 378 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

So far this year, the county has 781 new cases — an average of 111 per day — and 20 more hospitalizations — averaging 3 a day — but no new deaths attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,329 infected patients in their beds Friday morning — up 235 from Thursday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 84,092 since the pandemic started.

Closed a fifth consecutive day because of inclement weather after the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,740 cases, up 96 from Thursday morning.

Orange County, 5,043 cases, up 78.

Madison County, 1,455 cases, up 20.

Rappahannock County, 762 cases, up 7.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 34.6 percent statewide and 36.1 percent in the health district — both rising.

Anne Jenkins Moore

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

Fire destroys Upperville home under construction

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·
A fire early Thursday morning engulfed and destroyed “residential-style barn” under construction just north of Upperville.

Firefighters from Fauquier and Loudoun responded at about 1 a.m. to the blaze in the 8500 block of John S. Mosby Highway (Route 50).

“Engine 1105 from the Upperville Station in Fauquier County arrived on scene first to a heavy timber residential style barn estimated to be 10,000 square feet in size fully involved in fire,” Loudoun officials wrote in a press release Thursday afternoon. “The fire had extended to additional outbuildings, heavy equipment and a camper. There were no people or animals in the barn at the time of the fire.

“Crews used defensive operations to protect exposures and begin extinguishing the main fire. Collapse zones were established for safety and all personnel remained in a non-immediately dangerous to life and health position during operations. Most of the fire was extinguished by about 1:34 a.m. Fire crews remained on scene throughout the evening extinguishing the smaller fires and hotspots.”

By 4:40 a.m. firefighters completely extinguished the blaze.

Fire and rescue units from Fauquier, Middleburg, Aldie, Philomont, Purcellville and Mount Weather responded. Tankers shuttled water to the rural site.

The Loudoun County Fire and Rescue Fire Marshal’s Office continues to investigate.

There were no reported injuries to citizens or first responders.

Edward R. Moore Jr.

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

Bland named unit director of Boys & Girls Clubs

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

Lisa Marie Fuller

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

Smith-Midland promotes Stephanie Poe to controller

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

COVID-19 hospitalizations, cases rising rapidly here

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·
Fauquier has averaged 106 new COVID-19 cases and 3 more hospitalizations per day so far this year.
Vaccinations
74%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 52,695. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.7.%.


66.2%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,145. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.8%.


113,462
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning — up 225 from Wednesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Most are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 155 new COVID-19 cases and 4 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

As the surge continues, the health department Thursday morning reported 15,840 new cases since Wednesday morning and 11 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,642 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,202,727.

Fauquier’s cases total 9,776 since the pandemic started, with 376 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

So far this year, the county has 639 new cases — an average of 106 per day— and 18 more hospitalizations — averaging 3 a day — but no new deaths attributed to COVID-19.

Virginia hospitals reported 3,094 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning — up 127 from Wednesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 83,543 since the pandemic started.

Closed a fourth consecutive day because of inclement weather after the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,644 cases, up 155 from Wednesday morning.

Orange County, 4,965 cases, up 31.

Madison County, 1,435 cases, up 10.

Rappahannock County, 755 cases, up 3.

As of Thursday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 33.6 percent statewide and 34.4 percent in the health district — both rising.




Do you agree that we Americans have more that unites us than divides us?

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·

Lightning rod nominated as Va. environmental chief

Posted Thursday,
January 6, 2022
0 ·
Anrew Wheeler, 57, served from July 9, 2018, to Jan. 20, 2021, as the as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 15th administrator.
While we were optimistic we might be able to find some common ground with the new administration moving forward, this nomination makes it plainly clear that environmental protections are under attack in Virginia, and we are prepared to fight to defend them.
— Virginia League of Conservation Voters Executive Director Mike Town
By Sarah Vogelsong
The Virginia Mercury

Republican Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin announced Trump EPA chief and former coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler as his pick for Virginia’s next secretary of natural and historic resources.

“Virginia needs a diverse energy portfolio in place to fuel our economic growth, continued preservation of our natural resources, and a comprehensive plan to tackle rising sea levels,” Mr. Youngkin said in a news release announcing not only his selection of Mr. Wheeler but his intention to replace long-standing Department of Environmental Quality Director David Paylor with wetland restoration firm head Michael Rolband.

“Andrew and Michael share my vision in finding new ways to innovate and use our natural resources to provide Virginia with a stable, dependable and growing power supply that will meet Virginia’s power demands without passing the costs on to the consumer,” said Mr. Youngkin.

The choice, which was first broken by Politico early Wednesday and announced by Mr. Youngkin’s transition team Wednesday afternoon, sent shock waves through the state’s environmental circles.

“This is hands-down the most extreme nomination for an environmental post in Virginia’s history and the absolute worst pick that the governor-elect could make,” said Mike Town, executive director of the Virginia League of Conservation Voters. “While we were optimistic we might be able to find some common ground with the new administration moving forward, this nomination makes it plainly clear that environmental protections are under attack in Virginia, and we are prepared to fight to defend them.”

Mr. Wheeler, who served as administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from 2019 until the end of President Donald Trump’s administration, was an outspoken proponent of environmental deregulation during his tenure, ruffling feathers even among his own agency scientists.

The former coal lobbyist’s views on climate change have also troubled many environmentalists. While Mr. Wheeler during confirmation hearings for his EPA appointment said that “climate change is real” and “man has an impact on it,” he subsequently oversaw the unwinding of numerous regulations to reduce climate change-causing greenhouse gas emissions.

Among the actions taken during his tenure were the rollback of President Barack Obama’s never-enacted Clean Power Plan to reduce emissions from coal plants as well as the Obama administration’s stricter fuel efficiency standards for automobiles. Current Democratic Attorney General Mark Herring sued Mr. Wheeler and his EPA at least six times over environmental issues.

Since the end of his EPA term, Mr. Wheeler has slowly inched into Virginia politics. In September, he spoke out against a five-cent plastic bag tax during a hearing before Fairfax County’s Board of Supervisors. In November, following sweeping Republican victories in Virginia elections, he was appointed to Mr. Youngkin’s transition team.

Mr. Youngkin’s choice of Mr. Wheeler for the natural resources secretary position quickly provoked opposition from Democrats, who are already wary of the incoming governor’s environmental stance after Mr. Youngkin’s surprise December announcement that he intends to use executive action to pull Virginia out of a regional carbon market. Virginia’s participation in that market had been a top priority of Democrats when they took power in 2020.

Democratic Party of Virginia Chair Susan Swecker said Mr. Youngkin’s pick “makes clear that his administration will continue to fail Virginia on climate change as sea levels rise, rain events become more severe and record-setting temperatures threaten our economy and natural resources.”

Where Democrats’ opposition will matter most, however, will be in the Senate, where the party maintains a narrow 21-19 edge and could conceivably block an appointment such as Mr. Wheeler’s.

The 2022 General Assembly will convene Wednesday, Jan. 12.

Sen. Scott Surovell (D-Fairfax) said Wednesday that while Senate Democrats haven’t discussed the natural resources pick as a caucus, “I think a lot of our members are going to have very serious concerns” with Mr. Wheeler.

“I would think any Republican member who’s in any kind of competitive suburban seat would really need to think twice about voting for someone like him given where Virginia’s been leading on environmental policy,” said Sen. Surovell.

Jacqueline Hixson, a spokesperson for the Senate Democrats, said in an email that she couldn’t “say definitively whether any Youngkin appointments will be confirmed by the Senate.”

Harry Godfrey, executive director of Virginia Advanced Energy Economy, a clean energy business group that was one of the main architects of Democratic climate legislation in 2020, said that “it is vital” that the Senate consider Mr. Wheeler’s record with EPA to “determine whether it aligns with the policy direction that the General Assembly has established in recent years.”

Virginia under its last two years of Democratic control garnered national headlines for its efforts to combat climate change through decarbonization with a slate of policies more in line with those of Mid-Atlantic and New England states than its southern neighbors.

Under Gov. Ralph Northam and Democratic leadership of the General Assembly, Virginia pushed through measures committing the state’s electric grid to becoming carbon-free by 2045, authorizing participation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative cap-and-invest market and adopting the more stringent California auto emissions standards in place of federal ones.

The energy industry has responded to the policy measures. According to a report from the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, utility-scale solar is on track to become the state’s third largest source of electricity this year, displacing coal. In a major win for the state’s efforts to become the East Coast’s primary offshore wind hub, Siemens Gamesa this October announced it would build the nation’s first offshore wind turbine blade facility in Portsmouth.

Both the state’s two largest electric utilities, Dominion Energy and Appalachian Power Co., have also pivoted toward renewables. Appalachian Power began drawing power from solar for the first time this fall and on Tuesday released what it calls its “most robust renewables plan to date,” with plans to add almost 500 megawatts of solar and wind over the next three years.

Dominion, which plans to build a massive 2.6 gigawatt wind farm off the coast of Virginia Beach, has almost entirely divested its natural gas business and is selling investors on what it describes as “the largest, the broadest in scope, the longest in duration and the most visible regulated decarbonization opportunity among U.S. utilities.”

Republicans including Mr. Youngkin, however, have attacked many of the new policies as too costly for consumers and too risky for the electric grid, emphasizing a 2020 estimate by the State Corporation Commission that the Virginia Clean Economy Act will raise the average residential customer’s annual costs by $800 by 2030. During his campaign, Mr. Youngkin described the VCEA as “unworkable” and warned that the renewables transition would lead to “blackouts and brownouts and an unreliable energy grid.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
January 5, 2022
0 ·

County has 86 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Wednesday,
January 5, 2022
0 ·
Wednesday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
73.9%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 52,649. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.6.%.


66.1%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,104. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.8%.


113,237
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday morning — up 152 from Tuesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 86 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

As the surge continues, the health department Wednesday morning reported 10,728 new cases since Tuesday morning and 9 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,631 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,186,887.

Fauquier’s cases total 9,621 since the pandemic started, with 372 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

Virginia hospitals reported 2,965 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning — up 167 from Tuesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 82,987 since the pandemic started.

Closed a third day because of inclement weather after the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,556 cases, up 81 from Tuesday morning.

Orange County, 4,934 cases, up 26.

Madison County, 1,425 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 752 cases, up 4.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 32 percent statewide and 33.7 percent in the health district — both rising.


McDainel and Ohrstrom 2021 “Heritage Heroes”

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·

Warming centers available in Warrenton, Midland

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
A “Power & Shower” center at the WARF will be open until 8 p.m. Tuesday and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday.
Local governments have opened a “Power & Shower” warming center at the WARF (Warrenton Aquatic & Recreational Facility) to provide relief for those without electricity.

The town and county have partnered to open the center, County Administrator Paul McCulla announced Tuesday.

The Midland Church of the Brethren also will open its doors to assist residents in need of relief from the cold.

The three electrical companies serving the county have announced power may not be restored until late Tuesday and for some late Wednesday.

“They are working hard to restore power and until then their recommendation is for customers to find alternate shelter, backup power or find relief from the cold,” Mr. McCulla said.

The WARF, at 800 Waterloo Road, will be be available and open to assist those in need of relief until 8 p.m. Tuesday and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday.

Residents are not required to be WARF members but must check in at the front desk upon entry.

The WARF will have showers available. People should bring their own towels — along with toiletries — or the WARF has towels for sale.

Power stations will be available for those who bring power cords and devices in need or charging.

Free Wi-Fi is available on site.

Masks are required and COVID social distancing must be maintained.

A warming facility at Midland Church of the Brethren at 10434 Old Carolina Road opened at 4 p.m. Tuesday. It will stay open throughout the night and Wednesday or until no longer needed. Anyone in need of relief from the cold is welcome.

Power stations will be available, along with bathrooms — but no showers.

The church kitchen will provide snacks.

COVID social distancing is required.

For more information, call the church at 540-272-3489 or 540- 435-3016.

Interstate 95 nightmare cleared after 36 hours

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·
We do apologize, and we’ll be taking an exhaustive look at this incident.
— VDOT spokeswoman Kelly Hannon
A 50-mile stretch of Interstate 95 reopened around 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, 36 hours after thousands of motorists were stranded, some for more than 24 hours, because Monday's snowstorm.

As crews finally began to clear the interstate around 1 p.m. Tuesday, Virginia Department of Transportation officials called the situation "unacceptable" and promised an "exhaustive look at this incident."

Thousands of motorists remained trapped after Monday’s storm dropped up to a foot snow, which then turned to ice, around the region.

“We’re making progress to detour I-95 traffic between Caroline County and [Prince William County] to nearest exits,” VDOT said in a tweet at noon Tuesday. “Once vehicles have been removed including disabled tractor trailers, our plow train made up of several trucks & motorgraders will come through to remove the packed snow & ice.”

Marcie Parker, VDOT’s Fredericksburg District engineer, said the agency was overwhelmed by snowfall rates during the storm.

“I do believe VDOT was prepared for this storm but anticipated snowfall rates were faster than anticipated. We got more snow than initially predicted and the rate was harder,” she said during a Tuesday media briefing. “Pretty much when it gets over an inch and hour, we have a hard time keeping up.”

Though the storm was forecast well in advance, it started with rain and VDOT did not pretreat I-95.

“It would have just washed away any pretreatment,” Parker said.

Parker called the situation “unacceptable” and said the agency will be reviewing what went wrong. The trouble began early Monday with whiteout conditions in Stafford County, causing multiple tractor-trailers to jackknife. I-95 south was closed all day Monday, reopening briefly around 5:45 p.m., before closing down again. Northbound lanes fared slightly better, with one lane open through Stafford most of the day Monday. But by nightfall, it, too, was impassable.

Virginia State Police say there were no reports of deaths or injuries during the closure, though many stranded drivers were posting desperate pleas on social media though the night.

U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine was one of the stranded drivers, tweeting Tuesday morning that his usual two-hour drive to the Capitol had turned into 19 hours.

“I don’t know what’s been going on behind the scenes, but I feel like we’ve known this storm was coming, I’ve seen how we handled prior storms. I had a certain expectation how it would be handled and that expectation wasn’t met,” said Rebecca Barnes, who was stuck on I-95 north in Caroline County since 7 p.m. Monday returning from a trip to Florida to see family.

Barnes, owner of Prince William Living magazine and a first responder with the Occoquan-Woodbridge-Lorton Volunteer Fire Department, said the temperature dipped overnight to 14 degrees and the ground was too icy for those stranded to even get out of their cars and walk away.

As of 1 p.m., VDOT and state police began detouring stranded drivers who still had gas exit by exit both north and southbound before getting to work removing possibly hundreds of disabled vehicles and trucks.

But for those trapped on the interstate, some without food, gas or warm clothing, VDOT’s updates were no comfort.

Barnes said VDOT and state police made no effort to check on drivers stuck south of Fredericksburg or offer any assistance.

“I’d like to see some National Guard, some troopers walking over from the southbound side,” said Barnes, who was well-equipped to get through a night stuck on interstate and was traveling with family, but worried for others who were alone and unprepared.

On Twitter, families of drivers trapped pleaded for help, urging Gov. Ralph Northam to declare a state of emergency and send in the National Guard.

“Where is the National Guard? Please help us!!!” one wrote.

Another tweeted to Northam that he had been stuck in his car for 18 hours without insulin.

“Can someone please send help? I’m starting to feel very weak,” he wrote.

Another said her daughter and three grandchildren, one a 2-month-old baby with special needs, were trapped going on 14 hours and had run out of food.

Northam tweeted Tuesday morning that an “emergency message” was going out to those stranded “connecting them to support, and the state is working with localities to open warming shelters as needed.”

When pressed during Tuesday’s media briefing about why the National Guard wasn’t called in to help, Virginia Department of Emergency Management Communications Director Lauren Opett said no requests came from the state or localities to do so.

In Prince William County, fire and rescue personnel were using the Express Lanes — which remained closed to allow passage of first responders and highway crews — to hand out snacks, water and gas to those stranded.

When asked by reporters Tuesday why there had been no apology to the stranded motorists, VDOT Fredericksburg spokeswoman Kelly Hannon said, “We do apologize, and we’ll be taking an exhaustive look at this incident.”

VDOT said it expects the interstate to be fully reopened by Wednesday morning’s rush hour. Another media briefing is scheduled for 4 p.m. today.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·

Leona P. Gray

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·

Power outages may linger several days after storm

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·
Photo/REC
Rappahannock Electrical Cooperative reported more than 90,000 customers statewide without power during the storm Monday.
This is a historic outage event for REC. We have mobilized all of our resources and we have mutual aid from other states and cooperatives in Virginia working to assist REC. We know this is a difficult outage for many of our member-owners and their families, and all employees are working together to get the power back on.
— Casey Hollins, REC spokeswoman
Some Fauquier County residents who lost power as a result of Monday’s blizzard may not have service restored for several days.

Almost 3,400 Fauquier homes and businesses remained without electricity at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Rappahannock Electric Cooperative, which serves much of western Fauquier energy, in a news release said the organization is underway in what it calls an historic effort to restore electricity to more than 90,000 of its customers whose lines were interrupted by trees that toppled under the weight of wet and heavy snow and strong winds. The storm’s impact on the power grid and related equipment left more than 600 individual damage locations for crews to address, REC said.

According to the organization’s outage map, about 2,417 customers in Fauquier remained without power Tuesday morning.

The number had risen to more than 3,400 Tuesday afternoon.

Dominion Energy, which serves most of the county, reported 602 Fauquier customers without power.

Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative had 366 Fauquier customers without power Tuesday morning.

“This is a historic outage event for REC,” Casey Hollins, managing director of communications and public relations, said in a statement. “We have mobilized all of our resources and we have mutual aid from other states and cooperatives in Virginia working to assist REC. We know this is a difficult outage for many of our member-owners and their families, and all employees are working together to get the power back on.”

REC’s Culpeper region sustained extensive damage from the storm, and the organization expects some outages to persist through the end of the work week. REC advised customers to seek shelter in the meantime as below-freezing temperatures are anticipated in the coming nights.

Several hundred mutual-aid field employees from as far away as Indiana, Ohio, Missouri, Georgia and Florida will join REC crew to assist in making repairs and restoring power. Those additional crews will bring more bucket trucks and other heavy equipment to speed up restoration efforts, according to REC.

REC also has more than 100 tree trimming crew members with additional resources that arrived in the region Monday night. In restoring power, REC focuses first on the largest outages, including repairs to substations and large distribution circuits, according to the organization.

Washington Football Team to unveil new name Feb. 2

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·

County has 104 new COVID cases, 7 more hospitalized

Posted Tuesday,
January 4, 2022
0 ·
Almost one-third of PCR tests in this region and across Virginia have been positive over the last week.
Vaccinations
73.9%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 52,628. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.5.%.


66.1%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,069. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.7%.


113,085
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning — up 159 from Monday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.\
Fauquier has 104 new COVID-19 cases and 7 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

As the unprecedented surge continues, the health department Tuesday morning reported 15,449 new cases since Monday morning and 7 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,622 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,176,159.

Fauquier’s cases total 9,535 since the pandemic started, with 371 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

Virginia hospitals reported 2,798 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning — up 187 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 82,384 since the pandemic started.

Closed a second day because of inclement weather after the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,475 cases, up 42 from Monday morning.

Orange County, 4,908 cases, up 45.

Madison County, 1,421 cases, up 7.

Rappahannock County, 748 cases, up 4.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 29.9 percent statewide and 31.3 percent in the health district — both rising.


William S. Stokes IV

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
0 ·

Shrimp and oyster dinner Jan. 8 in Remington

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
0 ·

Have you started 2022 with a New Year’s resolution?

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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Reynolds “Bucky” Frazier

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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Teacher retention among many challenges for schools

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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Warrenton office building sells for $2.6 million

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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This office building on Blackwell Road in Warrenton sold for $2.6 million.
A 15,000-square-foot office building in Warrenton sold last week for $2.6 million.

Constructed in 2005, the two-story, brick building stands on 0.76 acre at 492 Blackwell Road. The property has 28 parking spaces.

The building tenants include Long & Foster Realtors and Pinnacle Dermatology.

For tax purposes, the county values the building at $1.7 million and the land at $665,000.

The property last sold for $2.7 million in August 2018, according to county real estate records.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Dec. 22-28, 2021:


Cedar Run District

William D. and Kimberly D. Belfour to Nathan and Michelle Cheeney, 1 acre, Lot 18, Poplar Grove Subdivision, 8139 Poplar Grove Drive, near Warrenton, $650,000.

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as manager, to NVR Inc., 0.58 acre, Lot 106, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, near Warrenton, $222,000.

Brian C. and Deborah L. Mann to Michael Landes and Katy Davis, 2.2 acres, 4498 Razor Hill Road, Bealeton, $375,000.


Center District

Jon G. and Kim L. Cassandra to Rachel M. and Michael J. Valerie Jr., 0.76 acre, Lot 19, Bethel Academy Subdivision, 7228 Academy Road, near Warrenton, $495,000.

Donna and Elsie A. Brown to P. Scott and Carolyn H. Shaeffer, Lots 8 and 9, Bartenstein Subdivision, 187 Linden St., Warrenton, $180,000.

Thomas H. and Debra K. Shiflett to Michael and Samantha Duda, Lot 19, Phase 2, Ridges of Warrenton Subdivision, 270 Cannon Way, Warrenton, $560,000.

Jeffrey A. Turner to Mary C. and Marcus C. Harris, 1.5 acres, Lot 21-A, Warrenton Lakes Subdivision, 7319 Mosby Drive, near Warrenton, $515,000.

Pat T. Adamo estate, Nicholas C. and Thomas J. Adamo as executors, to IRES VA LLC, 0.61 acre, Lot 69, Phase 3, Ivy Hill Subdivision, 7165 Manor House Drive, Warrenton, $215,000.

CS1 LLC, Mark Eid as manager, to Preowned Motorcars LLC, 0.76 acre, 492 Blackwell Road, Warrenton, $2,630,000.

Edward F. and Terra L. Phillips to Powell and Asher Kennerly, 0.2 acre, 32 S. Sixth St., Warrenton, $861,000.

George Sharikas to Michael and Barbara Sprouse, Townhouse 132-B, Leeds Square Subdivision, 132-B Fairfield Drive, Warrenton, $260,000.


Lee District

Tristan and Heather Olson to Ian C. and Leyla V. Keyser, Lot 181, Phase 2, Section E, Edgewood East Subdivision, 11391 Falling Creek Drive, Bealeton, $520,000.

Robert J. and Catherine A. Blount to James and Michelle M. Jordan, 3.7 acres, 10515 Saint Paul’s Road, near Bealeton, $477,000.

Katherine N. Guille and Douglas J. Weisbrod to Sherry L. Blackmon and Bridgette L. Wilderman, 1.5 acres, Lot 10, Indian Oaks Subdivision, 13218 Tall Oak Turn, Sumerduck, $365,150.

NVR Inc. to Christopher M. Albuquerque and Taylor Sarno, Lot 159, Phase A, Section 3-A, Mintbrook Subdivision, 4122 Clarke St., Bealeton, $509,990.

Michael J. Fox to Timothy Breen and Kelly Webster, 1.7 acres, Lot 19, Wivenhoe Park Subdivision, 14245 Snake Castle Road, Sumerduck, $349,900.


Marshall District

Haley C. Cowell to Charles R. Robbins Jr., 2.4 aces, 10033 Conde Road, near Marshall, $241,247.

Lori Blankenship to Katherine B. Morrow, 6.1 acres, and 5.4 acres, 7980 Leeds Manor Road, near Orlean, $779,000.

Karla M. Castaneda to Reina E.F., Carlos R. and Cristian R. Alvarado, 1.7 acres, 7628 Opal Road, near Opal, $485,000.

Laura G. Whitney to Bettina T. and Christopher S. Stern, 50 acres, Silo Road, near Hume, $800,000.

Mintbrook Developers LLC, Russell Marks as manager, to NVR Inc., 4,171 square feet, Lot 141, Phase A, Section 3-B, Mintbrook Subdivision, 8Bealeton, $104,200.

Lamar Edmonson, Sandy T. Hawkins and others, by special commissioner, to Upperville Properties LLC, 0.48 acre, 9223 Patrick St., Upperville, $305,000.

Jose D.B. Borja and others to Patrick Salmon, Unit 11, Section A, Marshall Townhouses, 4519 Fieldstone Court, Marshall, $225,000.

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Heritage 17VA LLC, Lot 29, Phase 1-B, Carters Crossing Subdivision, 8665 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $363,424.

Stephanie G. Hockman to Kellie M. Rex, 1.2 acres and 0.4 acre, 9480 Foxhunt Lane, near Marshall, $255,000.


Scott District

Vincent R. Hinkle to Libero Investments LLC, 1.4 acres, Lot 8, Greenbriar Acres Subdivision, 5542 and 5544 Old Bust Head Road, near Broad Run, $350,000.

Walter R. and Dona R. Loope to Glen P. and Toni C. Padeway, Lot 6, Block C, Rock Springs Estates Subdivision, 5110 Dumfries Road, near Warrenton, $473,000.

Barbara W. Gilbert to Jason C. Green, 10 acres, Lot 9, Zulla Hills Subdivision, 7254 Little River Lane, near The Plains, $685,000.

Gregory R. and Kalli N. Chaney to Joshua J. and Jessica L. Vaughn, Lot 28, Land Bay F, Phase A, Vint Hill Subdivision, 6749 Eckert Court, near Warrenton, $690,000.

Aran Capital Partners LLC, Mark S. Kelly as managing member, to Daniel Sabbagh and Emily Rogers, 2 acres, 5656 O’Bannon Road, near The Plains, $490,000.

John F. and Terri L. Kosek to Ross A. and Elizabeth C. Nelson, 2.8 acres, 7081 Grays Mill Road, near Warrenton, $650,000.

Hartz Construction Co. Inc. to Aviel Roshwald and Alene Moyer, 3.5 acres, Lot 2, 3199 Fortune Mountain Estates, near Marshall, $847,000.

Sally McClanahan Strother

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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Fauquier COVID-19 cases up 294 since Friday

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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Two-thirds of Fauquier residents have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine — getting close to the statewide rate of vaccination.
Vaccinations
73.8%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 52,589. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.5.%.


66.1%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 47,046. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.7%.


112,926
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning — up 60 from Sunday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 294 new COVID-19 cases since Friday morning and 6 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday morning.

As the unprecedented surge continues, the health department Monday morning reported 42,185 new cases since Friday morning and 28 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,615 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,160,703 — up 7,967 since Sunday morning.

Fauquier’s cases total 9,431 since the pandemic started, with 364 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

The health department had last updated its COVID-19 statistics on Friday morning, Dec. 31.

Virginia hospitals reported 2,611 infected patients in their beds Monday morning — up 206 from Sunday morning.

Up 429 since Friday, Virginia hospitalizations total 81,404 since the pandemic started.

Closed for snow after the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools reported no active cases Monday morning.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,433 cases, up 294 from Friday morning, and its 96th death.

Orange County, 4,863 cases, up 165.

Madison County, 1,414 cases, up 59.

Rappahannock County, 744 cases, up 15.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 27.9 percent statewide and 30 percent in the health district — both rising.

Brandi Dawn Street

Posted Monday,
January 3, 2022
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761 homes moving toward construction at Clevenger’s

Posted Sunday,
January 2, 2022
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Site work continues for development of Clevenger’s Village at Routes 211 and 229 about eight miles west of Warrenton.
The village center concept was conceived with the idea that concentrating growth in appropriate locations would help preserve the rural character of Culpeper County. The area is already served with public water and sewer, and as such, it is an appropriate location for some concentration of residential development.
— Board of supervisors Chairman Gary Deal
By Maria Basileo
The Culpeper Times

Development of more than 700 homes, anchored near the edges of Fauquier, Culpeper and Rappahannock counties, continues to make progress toward becoming a reality.

Florida-based home construction company Lennar Corp. in August broke ground on its first section of “Stonehaven,” eight miles west of Warrenton at 18163 Golf Lane near Jeffersonton.

While there was once a sign on the property indicating homes would become available last fall, Lennar Vice President for Communications Danielle Tocco said, “Sales for three collections of single-family homes will begin in mid-to-late December from a sales trailer on Golf Lane prior to starting construction on our first section of single-family homes.”

The development of the wooded Clevenger’s Corner site, at Rixeyville Road and Lee Highway, has been up in the air since 2005, when the Culpeper County Board of Supervisors rezoned the property. Centex Homes purchased the Clevenger’s Village project that year but never developed the property in the wake of the housing market collapse. Centex sold to Pulte Homes in 2014, and Saadeh Partners bought Clevenger's Village in August 2018.

Based in Miami, Lennar last February bought the 1,440 acres for $20.7 million from Saddeh Financial LL C of Woodbridge, according to county real estate records. Founded in 1954, Lennar builds homes in 23 states across the country, including Pennsylvania, California and Texas.

Culpeper County’s Comprehensive Plan designates Clevenger’s Corner as a “village center,” board of supervisors Chairman Gary Deal noted.

“The village center concept was conceived with the idea that concentrating growth in appropriate locations would help preserve the rural character of Culpeper County,” Mr. Deal said. “The area is already served with public water and sewer, and as such, it is an appropriate location for some concentration of residential development.

“The project will also accommodate and trigger commercial development, which is positive from an economic standpoint.”

For decades, the potential development of Clevenger’s Corner has raised concerns in Fauquier — particularly about increased traffic on Route 211 and on Broadview Avenue in Warrenton.

Stonehaven will include 761 single-family homes and townhomes. Single-family homes prices will start “in the upper $400,000 range,” Ms. Tocco said. Townhome pricing has not been released.

General contractor SW Rodgers of Gainesville continues to prepare the site.

A commuter parking lot on Route 211 next to the development will remain open but eventually will move east on Lee Highway, Ms. Tocco said.

Winter storm warning expanded for the region

Posted Sunday,
January 2, 2022
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Southern Fauquier will get more snow Monday than areas to the north, according to the National Weather Service.
The National Weather Service has expanded its winter storm warnings for overnight, with more snow now in the forecast.

A winter storm warning begins at 1 a.m. Monday for Fauquier, Prince William, Stafford and Arlington and Fairfax counties. Forecasters are now calling for 3 to 3 inches of snow for most of the D.C. area and south, with snow heavy at times and wind gusts up to 35 mph.

Unlike a watch, which means severe weather is possible, a warning means severe weather is imminent. The warning ends at 4 p.m. Monday.

The National Weather Service Sterling forecast office high-end snow map shows nearly 8 to 14 inches of snow possible under some storm models.

Loudoun and other western suburbs remain under a winter weather advisory with total expected between 3 to 5 inches.

Though it will be quite warm today, a coastal low pressure system moving through tonight into Monday will drop temperatures into upper 20s and low 30s, the National Weather Service says. That low has trended north and west over the last 24 hours, bringing potential for heavy snow, particularly from D.C. into the southern suburbs.

Gusty winds accompanying the storm could cause drifting and blowing snow.

Precipitation is expected to start as rain by 3 a.m. for most of the region, turning to snow and continuing through Monday afternoon.

The weather service says the forecast continues to change and urges area residents to stay on top of updates through the day.

Madeline V. Owens

Posted Sunday,
January 2, 2022
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Katherine J. Cunningham

Posted Sunday,
January 2, 2022
0 ·

Francis L. Jones

Posted Saturday,
January 1, 2022
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Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
December 31, 2021
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Stops Along the Way: Testing a man’s reach

Posted Friday,
December 31, 2021
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County has 168 new COVID cases, 11 more hospitalized

Posted Friday,
December 31, 2021
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Friday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
73.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 52,399. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.1%.


65.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 46,936. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.5%.


111,962
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning — up 281 from Wednesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 168 new COVID-19 cases and 11 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

As the unprecedented surge continues, the health department Friday morning reported a record 17,618 new cases and 22 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,587 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,118,518.

Fauquier’s cases total 9,137 since the pandemic started, with 358 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

The county set a one-day record with 189 new cases reported Wednesday, with another 139 on Thursday.

So far this month, Fauquier has 1,581 new COVID-19 cases — an average of 52.7 per day, 50 more hospitalized patients and 7 additional deaths.

Virginia hospitals reported 2,182 infected patients in their beds Friday morning — up 81 from Thursday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 80,456 since the pandemic started.

Closed for the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 206 students and 5 staff members in quarantine Thursday, Dec. 16. A week earlier, the school system had 170 students and 3 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,139 cases, up 95 from Thursday morning.

Orange County, 4,698 cases, up 75.

Madison County, 1,355 cases, up 22.

Rappahannock County, 729 cases, up 15.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 21.5 percent statewide and 23.4 percent in the health district — both rising.



Ginger Heflin Campbell

Posted Friday,
December 31, 2021
0 ·

David C. Collins

Posted Friday,
December 31, 2021
0 ·

Patricia V. Coble

Posted Thursday,
December 30, 2021
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Biz Buzz: Chamber presents its top awards for 2021

Posted Thursday,
December 30, 2021
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Contributed Photo
Fauquier Chamber 2021 Business Person of the Year Carmen Rivera (center) with Chairwoman Marianne Clyde and Chairwoman-elect Michelle Coe.
Allen Wayne Ltd.’s gold “Davey Awards” from Academy of Interactive & Visual Arts.
The Fauquier Chamber of Commerce recently announced its top award recipients for 2021.

Presented during a luncheon at Fauquier Springs Country Club, the four awards went to:

• Businessperson of the Year – Carmen Rivera of State Farm Insurance
Ms. Rivera has worked with State Farm Insurance since 2000, and has operated her own agency for five years. Active in the community, she founded the Real Men Wear Pink Campaign of Fauquier and participates in numerous fundraisers for military veterans, first responders and the local schools. Ms. Rivera also serves on the chamber board and the Be The Change Foundation Advisory Board.

• Small Business of the Year – Bedrosian Cleaning Services
Austin Bedrosian and his wife Sarah opened their business in 2018 when they discovered they were expecting their first child, Charli. “Since then, they have gone above and beyond the expectations of their corporate clients, leading with both dependability and quality of work,” chamber Executive Director Alec Burnett said.

• Large Business of the Year – Claire's at the Depot
“Claire’s at the Depot is an iconic restaurant in Warrenton, being recognized as one of the Top 100 Most Romantic Restaurants in the Country by OpenTable and WTOP,” Mr. Burnett said. Claire Lamborne opened the restaurant in February 2005.

• Nonprofit of the Year – Fauquier SPCA
“The Fauquier SPCA has rehomed and placed thousands of animals, from cats, dogs, pigs, goats, sheep and more to their forever homes,” Mr. Burnett said. “Throughout the pandemic, they’ve continued to conduct a highly professional organization, while working closely with community collaborators to raise awareness on animal welfare in Fauquier.”


Allen Wayne Ltd. wins branding gold

Vint Hill-based Allen Wayne Ltd. has received two gold “Davey Awards” from the Academy of Interactive & Visual Arts in New York for design and branding work.

The Davey Awards honor the “Davids” of creativity — small agencies and firms worldwide.

Allen Wayne Gold awards for its branding and design for Beltway Brewing Co. and Veterans Outdoor Fund. Robert Pace, the local firm’s creative director, and web designer Emily Robillard produced the award-winning work.

“After designing several amazing labels for Beltway, we were excited to partner with Allen Wayne to develop our refreshed retail brand,” said brewing company owner Sten Sellier. “They did an incredible job aligning with our mission and bringing our vision to life. Their branding work has helped us better connect with our local community and creatively communicate the Beltway experience.”

VOF board member Ashley Leigh said: “Allen Wayne was a perfect fit. They assisted with identifying our core objectives and provided us a simple pathway to get results. They were with us the from start to finish and were especially attentive to the details. Their creativity and ability to capture our thoughts was nothing short of amazing.”

Mr. Pace said, “We are extremely honored to receive such an important award for our branding efforts and am grateful our hard work has been recognized, as I am certain our fellow competitors are very capable, creative individuals . . . .

“I sincerely thank the Davey judges for these awards, and our friends at Beltway and VOF for trusting us with their brands.”


Oak View Bankshares established

Warrenton-based Oak View National Bank has completed the creation of a holding company.

Oak View Bankshares Inc. has become the bank’s parent company, a reorganization that stockholders approved in August.

In the reorganization, stockholders exchanged each outstanding share of the bank's common stock for one share of the new company's common stock.

The change will give the company more flexibility in conducting business, according to CEO and Chairman Michael Ewing.

“The reorganization was undertaken due to the phenomenal growth we have experienced over the last 18 months,” Mr. Ewing said. “It will provide a vehicle for access to new capital to support an increased capacity to allow continued growth of the bank.

“We are excited about the opportunities this reorganization will bring to our Company and the impact it will have on our strategic direction which is in the best interests of our customers, our employees, our community and our shareholders.”

The company’s common stock continues to trade over the counter under the same ticker symbol, OAKV, that the bank used.

Shareholders who hold stock certificates will not be required to exchange bank certificates for company certificates but will have the option to do so by contacting the transfer agent, Computershare Inc., P.O. Box 505000, Louisville, Ky. 40233-5000, or by telephone at 800-368-5948.

Founded in 2009, Oak View National Bank has branches in Warrenton, Marshall and Culpeper and a loan production office in Washington, Va.

Oak View’s total assets stood at $327.72 million Sept. 30, and deposits totaled $283.73 million.


Walker Jones earns accolades

Founded 43 years ago in Warrenton, Walker Jones PC has been recognized nationally as a “Best Law Firm 2022” by U.S. News & World Report.

Amy Totten, a partner who focuses on family law, was recognized as a “Best Lawyer 2022” by U.S. News & World Report.

With a branch office in Washington, Va., Walker Jones also received regional recognition from Northern Virginia Magazine. Partners Susan Pierce, focusing in personal Injury, Michael Brown, with a general civil practice (real estate, estate planning, and zoning and land use), and Ms. Totten, were chosen as “Top Lawyers 2021” by their Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C., peers. They were featured in the December issue of Northern Virginia Magazine.

County has 139 new COVID cases, 3 more hospitalized

Posted Thursday,
December 30, 2021
0 ·
So far this month, Fauquier has 1,413 new COVID-19 cases — an average of 48 per day, 39 more hospitalized patients and 7 additional deaths.
Vaccinations
73.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 52,399. Statewide, the rate stands at 77.1%.


65.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 46,936. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.5%.


111,962
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning — up 281 from Wednesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 139 new COVID-19 cases and 3 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

As the surge continues, the health department Thursday morning reported a record 13,500 new cases and 24 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,565 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,100,900.

Fauquier’s cases total 8,969 since the pandemic started, with 347 hospitalized patients and 95 deaths.

The county set a one-day record with 189 new cases reported Wednesday.

Virginia hospitals reported 2,101 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning — up 87 from Wednesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 80,166 since the pandemic started.

Closed for the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 206 students and 5 staff members in quarantine Thursday, Dec. 16. A week earlier, the school system had 170 students and 3 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 8,044 cases, up 118 from Wednesday morning.

Orange County, 4,623 cases, up 70.

Madison County, 1,333 cases, up 17.

Rappahannock County, 714 cases, up 6.

As of Thursday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 19.3 percent statewide and 21.8 percent in the health district — both rising.



Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
December 30, 2021
0 ·

Mancy Cook Jr.

Posted Thursday,
December 30, 2021
0 ·

Window for bipartisanship about to open in Virginia

Posted Wednesday,
December 29, 2021
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Fauquier Hospital earns $13.8-million profit in 2020

Posted Wednesday,
December 29, 2021
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Community leaders organized “Operation: Light the Night,” a parade to honor Fauquier Hospital’s front-line staff members as the pandemic began in April 2020.
Fauquier Hospital in 2020
• Beds: 97

• Patient days: 12,004

• Admissions: 2,937

• Full-time employees: 428

• Net revenue per admission: $18,957

• Total revenue: $115.7 million

• Profit: $13.8 million

• Margin: 12 percent

• Net worth: $187.8 million


Source: Virginia Health Information Industry Report
Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, which halted and then curtailed non-emergency medical procedures, Fauquier Hospital earned a $13.8-million profit in 2020, according to a new industry report.

The hospital last year posted a 12-percent profit on revenue of $115.7 million, Richmond-based Virginia Health Information reported Dec. 17.

Fauquier Hospital has earned an average annual profit of $17.9 million over the last eight years.

> Chart at bottom of story

Last year marked the second time that the hospital’s annual profit dipped below $19 million since 2014, the initial year of operations under Tennessee-based LifePoint Health.

The 97-bed Warrenton hospital had averaged a $21-million profit in the five years before 2019, Virginia Health Information reported.

VHI’s latest report covers the hospital’s second year of operations under the ownership of Apollo Global Management, which purchased publicly-traded LifePoint for $5.6 billion in November 2018.

Fauquier Hospital’s operations and financial performance reflect industry trends, along with greater competition in the region.

At 12,004 last year, “patient days” continued to decline — versus 24,711 in 2014 — with the ongoing shift to outpatient services.

Admissions totaled 2,937, down 23 percent from 2019.

The number of full-time employees at the local hospital also has dropped from 771 in 2013, its last year as a not-for-profit institution, to 428 in 2020, according to VHI.

The full-time employee count stood at 521 in 2019.

Fauquier Hospital remains much stronger financially than many of its peers across the commonwealth.

The 2020 VHI report shows that 22 of 107 Virginia hospitals lost money in 2020.

Fauquier’s 12-percent profit margin ranked 37th among Virginia hospitals in 2020.

Bon Secours Richmond Community Hospital in Richmond posted the state’s highest profit margin at 43.6 percent, representing net earnings of $110.2 million.

Fauquier Hospital reported $2 million in charity care and $5.6 million in bad debt last year.

The Warrenton hospital at the end of that year had total assets of $212 million and liabilities of $22.3 million, according to VHI. That put the hospital’s net worth at $187.8 million.

The report does not include Fauquier Health’s related businesses, including medical practices, clinics, its nursing home and assisted-living facility.

VHI’s annual industry report details the efficiency and productivity of hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers and nursing homes licensed in Virginia. The data includes charity care, staffing levels, profit margins and more than a dozen other utilization and efficiency indicators across five performance categories: charges, costs, productivity and utilization, financial viability and community support.

Published every year, the report gives consumers and purchasers information about the facilities’ efficiency, costs and performance.


Region’s hospital profits

Ranked by their 2020 operating margin percentages, all of these selected hospitals, except Fauquier and Reston, are not-for-profit:

26.1 percent — Reston Hospital Center, $92.9 million

19.9 percent — Inova Fair Oaks, $68.6 million

12.5 percent — Winchester Medical Center, $18.4 million

12 percent — Fauquier Hospital, $13.8 million

9.9 percent — Inova Loudoun, $57.9 million

6.4 percent — Inova Fairfax, $122.1 million

6.4 percent — Novant/U.Va. Culpeper, $7.4 million

6.2 percent — Mary Washington (Fredericksburg), $36.6 million

5.4 percent — Novant/U.Va. Prince William (Manassas), $9.1 million

5.2 percent — Novant/U.Va. Haymarket Medical Center, $4.5 million

1.3 percent — U.Va. Medical Center (Charlottesville), $58.9 million

-6 percent — Warren Memorial (Front Royal), $4.1 million loss


Nursing homes

VHI also provided this information on Warrenton nursing homes’ financial performance in 2020:

Brookside Rehabilitation and Nursing of Warrenton posted a $5,3-million profit on revenue of $13.7 million. The 130-bed nursing home has the equivalent of 107 full-time employees.

Fauquier Health Rehabilitation & Nursing Center earned a $1-million profit on patient revenue of $7.5 million. The 113-bed nursing home has the equivalent of 91 full-time employees.

Fauquier Hospital Financial... by Fauquier Now

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
December 29, 2021
0 ·

New COVID-19 cases set records here and statewide

Posted Wednesday,
December 29, 2021
0 ·
Virginia hospitals report 2,014 COVID-19 patients in their beds — up 108 since yesterday.
Vaccinations
73.5%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 52,337. Statewide, the rate stands at 77%.


65.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 46,912. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.4%.


111,681
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday morning — up 256 from Tuesday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier and Virginia on Wednesday set records for new COVID-19 cases.

The county has 189 new cases and its 95th death attributed to COVID-19, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

As the surge continues, the health department Wednesday morning reported 12,112 new cases and 37 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,541 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,087,400.

Fauquier’s cases total 8,830 since the pandemic started, with 344 hospitalized patients.

Virginia hospitals reported 2,014 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning — up 108 from Tuesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 79,873 since the pandemic started.

Closed for the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 206 students and 5 staff members in quarantine Thursday, Dec. 16. A week earlier, the school system had 170 students and 3 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 7,926 cases, up 124 from Tuesday morning.

Orange County, 4,553 cases, up 58.

Madison County, 1,316 cases, up 26.

Rappahannock County, 708 cases, up 8.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 17.4 percent statewide and 18.6 percent in the health district — both rising.



Jackie E. Doores Jr.

Posted Wednesday,
December 29, 2021
0 ·

Do you make year-end financial contributions to charitable organizations?

Posted Tuesday,
December 28, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Springs CC has new management team

Posted Tuesday,
December 28, 2021
0 ·

Warrenton home, 13.8 acres sell for $1.5 million

Posted Tuesday,
December 28, 2021
0 ·
This home near Warrenton sold recently for $1.5 million.
This home near Marshall sold for $1.15 million.
A seven-bedroom home on 13.8 acres near Warrenton sold recently for $1.5 million.

Built in 2002, the brick home on Cannonball Ridge Lane features a gourmet kitchen, an open family room with built-in bookcases and a gas fireplace, an office, screened porch, finished lower level, patio and 3-car garage. The property also has a spring-fed, three-acre pond.

The Marshall District property went on the market in September with an asking price of $1.85 million, according to Realtor.com.

Laura Farrell of TTR Sotheby’s International Realty represented the seller and Gloria J. Beahm of Long & Foster in Warrenton represented the buyer.

Also recently:

• A four-bedroom home on 19.7 acres near Marshall sold for $1.15 million.

Built in 2007, the home on Grasslands Court went on the market in November with an asking price of $899,000, according to Realtor.com.

Debra Meighan of Washington Fine Properties represented the seller and Denny Kaydouh of Long & Foster in Arlington represented the buyer.

• Six apartment buildings — on Green, Jackson and Washington streets in Warrenton — sold for $7 million.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Dec. 15-21, 2021:


Cedar Run District

Floyd Hitt Jr. to Juan Sanchez and Natividad B. Mogollon, 1.5 acres, Lot 1, Section 1, Morrisville Woods Subdivision, 12713 Foxtrot Road, Bealeton, $176,000.

Germanico P. and Patrick J. Vaca to Julio C. Araujo Jr., 3.9 acres, Ritchie Road, near Elk Run, $75,000.

Millfield IV LLC, John M. Adams as manager, to Bryce J. and Amy N. Hunsucker, Lot 39, Phase 4, Millfield Subdivision, 8190 Major Watters Court, near Warrenton, $560,000.

Michael A. and Gloria J. Deluca to Gordon M. and Billie Y. Twiford, 15.6 acres, 4220 Family Farms Lane, near Bealeton, $650,000.

NVR Inc. to Kiera M. Tines and Robert Newton, 0.57 acre, Lot 75, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 6524 Bob White Drive, near Warrenton, $668,875.

Eric M. Summer to Susan G. Frost, 0.57 acre, Lot 48, Section 2, Warrenton Village Subdivision, 7484 Suncrest Drive, near Warrenton, $435,000.

Rockwood Homes Inc. to Erick X. L. Torres and Jeshayra Lopez-Rexach, 2.5 acres, 4626 Kimberwood Lane, near Midland, $499,900.

G. Dean Wood to Corey A. and Amanda N. Seal , 52.7 acres, Storybook Farm Lane, Goldvein, $339,500.

Todd A. and Tricia E. L. Neale to Michael C. and Shizuka O. Schagrin, 3.4 acres, Lot 5, Phase 2, Benner Division, 7700 Frytown Road, near Warrenton, $701,000.

Robert J. Smith, Randy G. Smith and others to Edward F. and Terra L. Phillips, 2 acres, Lot 2, Wilson Division, 5414 Germantown Road, near Midland, $520,000.

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as managing member, to NVR Inc., 0.61 acre, Lot 81, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, near Warrenton, $242,000.

Michael G. Anns, Gloria M.A. Crittenden and others to Jason and Molly Anns, 0.85 acre, 4670 Razor Hill Road, near Morrisville, $276,000.

Nicholas L. and Claudia M.A. Hendershot to Victoria M. and Andrew P. Matkins, 1.3 aces, 8481 Old Dumfries Rod, Catlett, $515,000.

RMH Builders LLC, Robert M. Heflin as member, to Yesenia and Arcadio A. Leyva Jr., 2 acres, Lot 4, Ingram Division, 11784 Bowery Lane, Catlett, $602,800,.


Center District

Mary T. M Laurin to Dorota and Adam F. Khan, 0.5 acre, 37 Madison St., Warrenton, $120,000.

Geoffrey P. and Bettina V. Grambo, trustees, to Justin D. and Michelle G. Hersh, Lot 1-C, King Estate Subdivision, 332 Winchester St., Warrenton, $640,000.

Stone Messer Properties LLC, Henry W. Elmore as managing member, to Silk Road Properties LLC, 1.49 acres, 394 and 404, Jackson St.; 0.76 acre, 35 and 45 Washington St., and 1.5 acres, 129 and 139 Green St., Warrenton, $7,000,000.

Michael and Samantha Duda to Jose D. Guevara, Lot 16, Breezewood Subdivision, 221 Academy Hill Road, Warrenton, $500,000.

Andrew P. and Taylor A. Ingersoll to Katherine M. and Michael D. Brown Jr., 0.91 acre, Lot 116-A, Bethel Academy Subdivision, 6450 Cadet Lane, near Warrenton, $552,000.

James F. Carver, by substitute trustee, to MZK Investment LLC, Lot 65, Section 2, Highlands of Warrenton Subdivision, 474 Estate Ave., Warrenton, $396,000, foreclosure.

Richard D. and Therese M. Crowther to Jess A. Lowry and Suzanne Funesti, Lot 90, Bethel Academy Subdivision, 7154 Academy Road, near Warrenton, $451,550.


Lee District

Thomas L. and Sarah M. Cureton to Kerri and Bonnie G. Wilson and Henry M. Wilson Jr., Lot 99, Phase 4, Bealeton Station Subdivision, 10827 Marina Way, Bealeton, $485,250.

Full House Investments LLC, Robert Samia as managing member, to Matthew R. and Barbara W. Cornwell, 1.2 acres, Lot 1, Opal Road Subdivision, 7671 Opal Road, near Opal, $699,900.

Benjamin R. and Elizabeth J.W. Welch to Nicholas T. and Blakeley L. Digby, 2.2 acres, Lot 23, Wivenhoe Park Subdivision, 14389 Snake Castle Road, Sumerduck, $375,000.

Jolly Investments LLC, Kelly M. and John Andrews as members, to Michael and Jesika Lane, 0.96 acre, Lot 2, Phase 1, Westbury Subdivision, 8010 Westbury Drive, near Warrenton, $630,000.

Gale W. Smith to James E.A. and Ricki A. Russell, 0.18 acre, 405 N. Duey Road, Remington, $349,000.

Saberton Co. LLC, Charles E. and Rosemary D. Saberton as members, to Timothy Wirick and Shamaillah Khan, 2.2 acres, 11465 Generals Court, Bealeton, $665,000.

Patricia L. and Philip A.S. Franklin to Steven P. Digby, Unit 307, Building 3, Phase 3, Waverly at Bealeton Condominiums, 6161 Willow Place, Bealeton, $160,000.

Mintbrook Developers LLC, Russell Marks as manager, top NVR Inc., 0.256 ace, Lot 145, Phase A, Section 3-B, Mintbrook Subdivision, Clarke St., Bealeton, $126,200.


Marshall District

L. Grey and Eva P. Brockman to Eric G. and Laura Rizzo, 13.8 acres, Lot 4, Cannonball Ridge Subdivision, 8079 Cannonball Ridge Lane, near Warrenton, $1,500,000.

Linda A. Bekermeier to Kelsey and Mitchell Sergerson, Lot 18, Mountain Shade Subdivision, 8400 Eldorado Drive, Marshall, $535,000.

Rodney C. and Stephanie M. McDonald to Michael E. and Carolyn S. Hylton, 7.2 acres, 9343 Lake Daniel Road, near Marshall, $845,000.

Daniel Arellano to Jolly Investments LLC, 4,037 square feet, Lot Q, Block G, Renalds Subdivision, 8467 Clover Court, Marshall, $279,000.

Theodore A. and Cori S. Kramer to Joseph and Charlotte A. Keren, 10.2 acres, Lot 34, Fleetwood Farms Subdivision, Rolling Hills Drive and Stillhouse Road, near Delaplane, $240,000.

Domonic Creek and Joannie E. Slusser to Moussa Ezzaroual and Fatima E. Rafia, Lot E, Block G, Renalds Subdivision, 8482 Ashby Ave., Marshall, $331,900.

Paul R. Decher to Paul and Donna Lumsden, 25 acres, Tapps Ford Road, near Amissville, $268,000.

Justyne L. and Janel L. Louk to Gabriela A.A. Fuentes, 1.2 ace, 3838 Lea Road, Marshall, $350,000.

Stephen L. and Tina N. Culver to Mihai Hriscu, 3 acres, off Leeds Manor Road, near Orlean, $163,000.

Colleen R. Harvey to Russell S. Richter, 1.6 acres, 6739 Leeds Manor Road, near Marshall, $373,000.

Tammy D. Shahan to Aran Capital Partners LLC, 1 acre, 5478 James Madison Highway, near The Plains, $271,000.


Scott District

Alison S. Holden to William F. and Elizabeth M. Hornsby, 5 acres, 6547 Culver Drive, near New Baltimore, $733,300.

William H. Woodson Jr. to Jerome F. and Jennifer L. Gray, 6.4 acres, 7419 Drake Drive, near Warrenton, $745,000.

Martha K. and William L. Williams to Sherry L. Bearden, Lot 26, Section 2, South Hill Estates Subdivision, 6752 Settlers Ridge Road, near Warrenton, $459,900.

Leanne Mullin to George and Cheryl McNamara, Lot 9, Phase 10-B, Brookside Subdivision, 4117 Eddy Court, near Warrenton, $845,000.

Angela M. Loconti to Cody M. and Lindsay G. Hogeboom, Lot 58, Section 1, Addition to Marstella Estates Subdivision, 7405 Auburn Mill Road, near Warrenton, $535,000.

Lori B. and Steven L. Monfort to Krista B. and John G. Power, Lot 22, Phase 2, Auburn Mill Estates Subdivision, 5317 Forrest Court, near Warrenton, $685,000.

Emily H. Meyer and Nelo A. Hakola to Christopher E. and Lauren A. Kichinko, 1 acre, Lot 6, Hakola Division, 7250 Baldwin Ridge Road, near Warrenton, $809,000.

Robert C. Newman Jr. to Ashleigh B. and Howard J. Marsh III, 1.2 acres, Lot 16, Auburn Mill Estates Subdivision, 7222 Earlys Road, near Warrenton, $750,000.

Ruby C. Hager and Deborah K. Shank to Anthony W. and Susan M. Wright, Unit 58, Suffield Meadows Condominiums, 6676 Suffield Lane, near Warrenton, $450,000.

Alan W. and Michelle Rosqenkoff to Jason and Gina Staufenberg, Lot 39, Phase 3, Auburn Mill Estates Subdivision, 5413 Nuthatch Court, near Warrenton, $707,500.

FS Development LLC, Devin Finan as manager, to NVR Inc., 0.98 acre, Lot 3, and 0.98 acre, Lot 6, Riley’s Estates Subdivision, Thoroughbred Road, off Riley Road, near New Baltimore, $620,000.

Nicholas A. Tiger to Shawn Reed, Lot 19, Section 9, Bull Run Mountain Subdivision, 2312 Lookout Road, near Haymarket, $580,000.

HTAE LLC, Charles D. Riviezzo as manager, to Michael J. Webert, trustee, 5.9 acres, off Atoka Road, near Marshall, $140,000.

HTAE LLC, Charles D. Riviezzo as manager, to Michael J. Webert, trustee, 2.5 acres, off Atoka Road, near Marshall, $105,000.

Lakeside Homes LLC, Devin T. Finan as managing member, to Zachary and Carine Efaw, Lot 9-A, Phase 11-B, Brookside Subdivision, 4020 Ashby Court, near Warrenton, $990,478.

Fauquier Medical Center LLC to Pioneer Companies LLC, 3.7 acres, Broad Run Church Road and Riley Road, near New Baltimore, $380,000.

Clifford P. Sebens and Virginia L. Lux to Bruce and Rebecca Case, 19.7 acres, Lot 16, English Chase Subdivision, 8873 Grasslands Court, near Marshall, $1,155,000.

NVR Inc. to Anthony F. and Anita Johan, 0.93 acre, Lot 1, Riley’s Estates Subdivision, 9800 Thoroughbred Road, near Warrenton, $985,000.

93 new COVID-19 cases, 94th death in Fauquier

Posted Tuesday,
December 28, 2021
0 ·
Tuesday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
73.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 52,295. Statewide, the rate stands at 76.9%.


65.8%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 46,880. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.4%.


111,425
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning — up 131 from Monday morning.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 93 new COVID-19 cases and its 94th death attributed to the virus, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

As the surge continues, the health department Tuesday morning reported 7,439 new cases and a record 185 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,504 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,075,288.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,906 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning — up 234 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 79,519 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier’s cases total 8,641 since the pandemic started, with 344 hospitalized patients.

Closed for the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 206 students and 5 staff members in quarantine Thursday, Dec. 16. A week earlier, the school system had 170 students and 3 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 7,802 cases, up 36 from Monday morning.

Orange County, 4,495 cases, up 67.

Madison County, 1,290 cases, up 12.

Rappahannock County, 700 cases, up 2.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 15.9 percent statewide and 17.4 percent in the health district — both rising.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
December 28, 2021
0 ·

James E. Mallory

Posted Tuesday,
December 28, 2021
0 ·

Michael Anthony Viscal

Posted Monday,
December 27, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report-12-27-2021

Posted Monday,
December 27, 2021
0 ·

Sarah Ait

Posted Monday,
December 27, 2021
0 ·

7 more Fauquier COVID patients hospitalized

Posted Monday,
December 27, 2021
0 ·
Stock Photo
Since the pandemic started, 344 Fauquier patients with COVID-19 have been hospitalized.
Vaccinations
73.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 52,274. Statewide, the rate stands at 76.9%.


65.8%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 46,863. Statewide, the rate stands at 67.4%.


111,294
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning — up 43 from Sunday morning.



Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 16 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 95 new COVID-19 cases — an average of 32 per day — since Friday and 7 more patients hospitalized, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday morning.

The health department Monday morning reported 4,472 new cases since Sunday — and 18,513 since Friday — along with and 25 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 15,319 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 1,067,849.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,672 infected patients in their beds Monday morning — up 38 from Sunday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 79,021 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier’s cases total 8,548 since the pandemic started, with 344 hospitalized patients and 93 deaths.

Closed for the winter break, Fauquier County Public Schools have reported 607 active cases — 440 among students and 167 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 206 students and 5 staff members in quarantine Thursday, Dec. 16. A week earlier, the school system had 170 students and 3 staff members in quarantine.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 7,766 cases, up 125 from Friday morning.

Orange County, 4,462 cases, up 56.

Madison County, 1,278 cases, up 16.

Rappahannock County, 698 cases, up 9.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 14.5 percent statewide and 16.2 percent in the health district — both rising.



Bonnie Lee Taylor Downes

Posted Monday,
December 27, 2021
0 ·

Daniel L. Canard Jr.

Posted Saturday,
December 25, 2021
0 ·

Simon W. Byler

Posted Saturday,
December 25, 2021
0 ·

David Lee Brundage

Posted Saturday,
December 25, 2021
0 ·
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