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Ellen’s Kitchen & Garden

How many people will your Thanksgiving celebration include?

Posted Wednesday,
November 24, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
November 24, 2021
0 ·

Trades building to open next fall at LFCC-Fauquier

Posted Wednesday,
November 24, 2021
0 ·
The LFCC Foundation will build and own the 8,000-square-foot training center for skilled trades.
“The expansion of trades programs on the Fauquier campus is good news for the home construction industry,” said LFCC Foundation Board Member Joel Barkman, founder and president/CEO of Golden Rule Builders in Catlett. “By investing in the infrastructure to develop the next generation of building trade professionals, LFCC is a valuable partner in addressing the skilled labor shortage. I’m proud to support the college.”
— Joel Barkman, Golden Rule Builders president and LFCC Foundation Board member
Lord Fairfax Community College plans to build and open a $3.8-million center for skilled trades training on its Fauquier campus by next fall.

“This opportunity to build a facility dedicated to trades education is thanks to a gift of 60 acres adjacent to campus from Fauquier County to the LFCC Educational Foundation,” college spokeswoman Sally Voth said in a press release Tuesday. “The college has been leasing space for trades instruction at Vint Hill, but that site is not ideal for those needs, and the lease expires in 2022.”

The new trades building will allow college to offer trades classes for the first time on the Fauquier campus and to begin a new carpentry program, Ms. Voth said.

The 8,000-square-foot, pre-engineered metal building also will house electrical, HVAC, plumbing and heavy equipment operator training programs. Construction will start in February.

“Providing career training and apprenticeships in the trades requires a custom-designed facility – we need flexible labs for hands-on learning, hard floors, high ceilings, state-of-the-art ventilation systems, multiple outlets and drop cords to accommodate the industrial and commercial training equipment and more,” said Jeanian Clark, vice president of LFCC Workforce Solutions and Continuing Education. “That’s why this new building is such exciting news. And it couldn’t come at a better time. With the state’s investment in the G3, FastForward and Re-Employing Virginians (REV) initiatives, enrolling in skilled-trades programs and high-demand career pathways has never been more affordable for students. Our area businesses and industries need our trades graduates.”

In addition to expanding trade offerings, the new building will allow the college to explore partnerships with Fauquier and Rappahannock County schools for potential new ventures, such as a trades academy, Ms. Clark said.

“The expansion of trades programs on the Fauquier campus is good news for the home construction industry,” said LFCC Foundation Board Member Joel Barkman, founder and president/CEO of Golden Rule Builders in Catlett. “By investing in the infrastructure to develop the next generation of building trade professionals, LFCC is a valuable partner in addressing the skilled labor shortage. I’m proud to support the college.”

The foundation, which will own the building and lease it to the college, has established the Building the Future Fund with a fundraising goal of $1.5 million. The money raised will go toward equipping the budling, bringing in experienced instructors, expanding instruction to more fields within career and technical education, such as welding and offering scholarships. There are naming opportunities for the building itself, as well as spaces inside.

Meanwhile, the $30-million Eleanor C. and William A. Hazel Hall — a 40,000-square-foot building for medical, science and technology instruction — will open next summer on the Fauquier campus.

For more information or to donate to the Building the Future Fund, contact Tami O’Brien, development officer, at 540-351-1046 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

County has 19 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Wednesday,
November 24, 2021
0 ·
Wednesday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
65.8%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 46,869. Statewide, the rate stands at 73.6%.


58.7%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,774. Statewide, the rate stands at 64.5%.


93,691
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning, up 424 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 18 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 19 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,406 since the pandemic started, with 302 hospitalized patients and 88 deaths.

Closed for Thanksgiving,Fauquier County Public Schools have 56 “active cases,” with 49 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 505 active cases — 371 among students and 134 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 155 students and 1 staff member in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 18. A week earlier, the school system had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Wednesday morning reported 1,535 new cases and 24 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,597 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 960,691.

Virginia hospitals reported 867 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning — up 4 from Tuesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 74,590 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,864 cases, up 17 from Tuesday morning, and its 90th death.

Orange County, 3,975 cases, up 16.

Madison County, 1,083 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 626 cases, up 4.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.9 percent statewide and 8.9 percent in the health district.

Dr. Trice Gravatte to lead regional health department

Posted Wednesday,
November 24, 2021
0 ·
Contributed Photo
Dr. L. Trice Gravatte has practiced family medicine more than three decades.
A veteran Culpeper physician, who previously practiced in Warrenton, will serve as the new health director of the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District, starting Feb. 1.

Dr. L. Trice Gravatte IV for eight years has served as the lead physician at UVA Primary Care Family Care of Culpeper. Dr. Gravatte joined UVA Health in 2013 after 25 years in private practice, primarily in Warrenton, then in Culpeper.

The regional health district serves Fauquier, Culpeper, Orange, Madison and Rappahannock counties.

The health department’s profile and workload have increased dramatically in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Colin Greene, director of the Lord Fairfax Health District, will continue to serve as the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District’s acting health director until Dr. Gravatte moves into the position.

Dr. Wade Kartchner retired as the regional health district director in March.

Born in Southwest Virginia, Dr. Gravatte grew up in Fairfax County. He earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental science from University of Virginia in 1981 and his medical degree at the Medical College of Virginia in 1985.

Dr. Gravatte played a central role in establishment of the Fauquier Free Clinic in 1993.

He continues to volunteer at The Free Clinic of Culpeper and serves on the Northern Piedmont Community Foundation board of directors. He is married and enjoys chasing two young grandchildren, traveling, golf, hiking and UVA sports.

Local Wreaths for Veterans effort seeks financial help

Posted Tuesday,
November 23, 2021
0 ·

Stops Along the Way: Savor Thanksgiving and leftovers

Posted Tuesday,
November 23, 2021
0 ·

County has 22 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Tuesday,
November 23, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier County Public Schools reported 6 new cases Tuesday morning.
Vaccinations
65.8%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 46,869. Statewide, the rate stands at 73.6%.


58.7%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,774. Statewide, the rate stands at 64.5%.


93,691
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning, up 424 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 18 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 22 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,387 since the pandemic started, with 301 hospitalized patients and 88 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 6 new cases Tuesday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 56, with 49 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 505 active cases — 371 among students and 134 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 155 students and 1 staff member in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 18. A week earlier, the school system had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 1,586 new cases and 25 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,573 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 959,156.

Virginia hospitals reported 863 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning — up 17 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 74,522 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,847 cases, up 13 from Monday morning.

Orange County, 3,959 cases, up 7.

Madison County, 1,079 cases, up 5.

Rappahannock County, 622 cases, up 2.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.8 percent statewide and 8.9 percent in the health district.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
November 23, 2021
0 ·

29.79 acres near Midland sell for $3.3 million

Posted Monday,
November 22, 2021
0 ·
Smith-Midland Corp. purchased the land just to its south at Catlett and Germantown roads.
A 29.8-acre parcel with industrial zoning near Midland sold last week for $3.3 million.

The land at Catlett (Route 28) and Midland roads previously formed part of Al-Mara Farm Inc., Jeff and Patty Leonards’ dairy operation that they closed in January 2018.

Neighboring Smith-Midland Corp., which manufactures a broad range of precast concrete materials, paid cash for the property, including the Leonards’ former home on 1.8 acres.

The corner property became well known for Cows-N-Corn, one of the region’s first an agritourism attractions, which the Leonards launched in 2001. They have moved Cows-N-Corn to their Maple Tree Farm, just east of Warrenton, which also hosts Christmas and Halloween attractions.

The Midland property had been listed for $3.5 million.

Bill Chipman’s CRES (Commercial Real Estate Services Inc.) in Warrenton represented the sellers.

The Cedar Run District sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier real estate transactions.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Nov. 11-17, 2021:


Cedar Run District

Michael Cornish to Douglas D. and Michele K. Cox, 3.1 acres, 4338 Catlett Road, Midland, $465,000.

Dawn and Daniel P. Doheny to Christina M. Leonard, 1.2 acres, Lot 8, Section 1, Terranova Subdivision, 7312 Terranova Drive, near Warrenton, $499,999.

Steve Yoder, trustee, to Gloria S. Swartzentruber, Mahala Schrock and Barbara J. Schrock, 5.9 acres, Lot 3, Cedar Run Estates Subdivision, 9019 Charity Lane, Catlett, $475,000.

Jeffrey A. and Patricia A. Leonard to Smith-Midland Corp., 1.5 acres, 5225 Catlett Road, near Midland, $525,000.

Jeffrey A. and Patricia A. Leonard to Smith-Midland Corp., 28.2 acres, Catlett Road, near Midland, $2,775,000.

Floyd R. Hitt Jr. to Elizabeth S. Naehle and John O. Havranek, 4.3 acres, Midland Road, near Midland, $120,000.

Vernon L. Riley estate, Dwayne Riley as executor, to Robert E. and Frances R. Faylor, 5.1 acres, 8161 Greenwich Road, near Catlett, $200,000.


Center District

Ann J. Sutphin estate, Virginia Hodgson as executor, to Alison Zartman, Unit 217, Group 9, Phase 2, Leeds Square, 217 Fairfield Drive, Warrenton, $310,000.

LRW Investments & Property Management LLC, Jamie and Jeffrey Weiss as members, to Ethan and Jordan Bertschinger, 0.53 acre, Lot 177, Addition to Warrenton Lakes Subdivision, $555,000.

Margaret Niblack and others, by special commissioner, to Min S. Huang and Phoebe Chan, Unit 261, Phase 2, Group 10, Leeds Square, 261 Fairfield Drive, Warrenton, $300,000.

Fauquier Habitat for Humanity Inc. to Delmy Valdez, Lot 10, Sterling Court Subdivision, 122 Flikeid Lane, Warrenton, $300,000.


Lee District

Anthony and Kati Woodson to Ngozi Okolo, Lot 35, Section 2, Phase A, Mintbrook Subdivision, 2989 Revere St., Bealeton, $515,000.

Beverly J. and James G. Flanagan to Rona and Joseph Delaney, 30.3 acres, 13511 Silver Hill Road, Sumerduck, $450,000.

Robert B. and Lisa K. Owens to Nicholas J.U. Poole and Britney N. Cassandra, 0.57 acre, Lot 3, Phase 1, Crestwood Knolls Subdivision, 6625 Schoolhouse Road, Bealeton, $365,000.

Christopher J. Giannico to Darlena M. Brill, 10,000 square feet, Lot 43, Section 1, Meadfield Subdivision, 6418 Beales Court, Bealeton, $360,000.


Marshall District

Michael R. Wilson, trustee, to Ramin Shirazi, 20 acres, Lot 2, Buck Run Hunt Estates Subdivision, 5727 Keyser Road, Hume, $450,000.

Roger L. and Patricia A. Merica to William S. Smith and Mark L. Stevens, 5 acres, Rt. 738, near Marshall, $250,000.

Blue Hills Estates LLC, Devin T. Finan as member, to Lakeside Homes LLC, 0.91 acre, Lot 3, and 0.91 acre, Lot 4, Blue Hills Subdivision, near Warrenton, $480,000.

George V. Biondi and Bridgette S. Evans to House Buyers of America Inc., 3.6 acres, Lot 4, Green Lane Subdivision, 12135 McDonald’s Lane, Hume, $323,000.


Scott District

Kenneth and Andrea Justice to James E. and Katherine F. Reed, Lot 16, Lakeview Trace Subdivision, 4564 Mackenzie Court, near Warrenton, $750,000.

Michael and Jennifer McGinn to Carson Mason and Jenna Bartholomew, 0.99 acre, Lot 11, Phase 1, Grapewood Estates Subdivision, 4305 South Starcrest Drive, near Vint Hill, $520,000.

Elizabeth M. and Stephen Simon to House Buyers of America, 1.2 acres, Lot 22, Section 1, South Hill Estates Subdivision, 5218 Beverly Court, near Warrenton, $380,000.

Kitty Dennis heirs, by special commissioner, to CC Total Home Solutions, 2 acres, 2940 Atoka Road, near Marshall, $122,000.

Charles Dowdy heirs, by special commissioner, to Jennifer M. Elliott, 0.88 acre, Dovetail Lane, near Warrenton, $80,000.

Scott and Rachael Bowley to Michael and Maria Flournoy, Lot 58, Phase 8-D, Brookside Subdivision, 6573 Wellspring Court, near Warrenton, $855,000.

Cheryl L. and Larry Caruthers Sr. to Jarod C. and Rebecca A. Rehmann, 9.5 acres, Lot 3, Beaconsfield Subdivision, 7105 Beaconsfield Lane, near Warrenton, $803,000.

Virginia agencies getting rid of single-use plastics

Posted Monday,
November 22, 2021
0 ·
Stock Photo
Gov. Northam’s March order directed all state agencies including public colleges and universities to start phasing out single-use plastics with an ultimate goal of eliminating their use by the end of 2025.
We’re not tone deaf to the need to have solutions to plastic waste. So what we are also trying to do with the Youngkin administration is provide alternatives.
— Brett Vassey, Virginia Manufacturers Association president
By Sarah Vogelsong
The Virginia Mercury

The road to getting rid of single-use plastics at the Virginia Department of Corrections is littered with security protocols — specifically, ensuring that nonplastic bottles and cutlery can’t be used as weapons.

“There’s a lot of things we can’t change strictly to aluminum,” said Russell Vanness, the department’s sustainability administrator. “You can’t possibly make a weapon out of” a standard single-use plastic water bottle, he said. But other, more rigid drink containers “can be made into a blade of some kind.”

As Virginia agencies begin complying with Gov. Ralph Northam’s March directive to wean off of single-use plastics, DOC isn’t alone in encountering some unexpected challenges. The Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton is hunting for a replacement for the plastic hinged containers it uses to sell more than half a dozen flavors of fudge. Everyone is uncertain what to use in place of plastic garbage can liners.

Still, said Sharon Baxter, a division director with the Department of Environmental Quality, which is overseeing the push to phase out the state government’s use of disposable plastic, “I’ve been really impressed with how sincere an effort people have put forth on this.”

Gov. Northam’s March order, known as Executive Order 77, directed all state agencies including public colleges and universities to start phasing out single-use plastics with an ultimate goal of eliminating their use by the end of 2025. Disposable plastics used for medical purposes were exempt, and greater latitude was given to those used for public health or safety reasons.

As justification, the governor pointed to not only an increase in the state’s solid waste, but also the threats plastic pollution poses to the Chesapeake Bay.

“Plastics are the most pervasive type of marine debris in our ocean and along our coasts,” Gov. Northam wrote.

Agencies have complied with the executive order, said Ms. Baxter. Since it went into effect, DEQ has received 114 of an expected 116 plastic pollution reduction plans from agencies. A more wide-ranging report on how Virginia can reduce and divert solid waste from landfills that the Secretary of Natural Resources was supposed to submit to the governor and the General Assembly by Oct. 1 has not been completed.

Changes are already underway. The Frontier Culture Museum has started selling metal water bottles and phased out plastic ones. Virginia’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Authority said in its plan that it’s working to replace roughly 2 million plastic bags used a month with reusable bags by December 2022.

“We think we have 99 percent of state employees covered by the plans that were submitted,” Ms. said Baxter. That can have a big impact: “The state’s buying power is pretty immense,” she said.


Manufacturers push against order

While the March order caught some agencies off guard, it was in line with a string of plastic waste reduction measures Virginia Democrats rolled out during their two years of control in Richmond, a tenure set to end this January with the arrival of Republican Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin and a Republican controlled House of Delegates.

Besides the single-use plastic phaseout at state agencies, Democrats allowed local governments to impose a 5-cent tax on certain plastic bags — an option several began exercising this year — narrowly approved banning polystyrene food containers by 2025 and banned balloon releases. More controversially, they also smoothed the path for chemical recycling facilities that repurpose existing plastics to locate in Virginia.

The ban on state agencies’ use of disposable plastics has sparked an industry backlash.

In late 2019, in response to the prospect of a polystyrene ban, a collection of business groups formed the Coalition for Consumer Choices, which includes the Virginia Manufacturers Association and chemical company trade group the American Chemistry Council. This July, the coalition sent a letter to Northam’s administration arguing that EO77 “makes Virginia far less sustainable and is perhaps the most unrealistic and overreaching regulation of its kind in the United States today.”

The coalition says that the executive order will lead to increased landfilling because plastic alternatives generally weigh far more than plastics and aren’t recyclable, as well as increased greenhouse gas emissions.

“There is ample evidence that use of common alternatives to plastic packaging items leads to increased GHG emissions, not less,” the businesses wrote, citing a 2020 study by Imperial College London researchers as well as several industry studies.

Brett Vassey, president and CEO of the Virginia Manufacturers Association said that rather than banning single-use plastics, the coalition would like to see a greater emphasis on development of a “circular economy” that focuses more on reusing and repurposing materials rather than discarding them.

Mr. Vassey said the coalition has reached out to the incoming Youngkin administration to put rollback of the executive order “on their watchlist” and is proposing a range of measures such as improving funding to beef up what he calls “anemic” recycling infrastructure on the local level and making recycling centers tax exempt.

“We’re not tone deaf to the need to have solutions to plastic waste,” he said. “So what we are also trying to do with the Youngkin administration is provide alternatives.”

A spokesperson for Mr. Youngkin did not respond to the question of whether the administration had any plans to rescind or amend the order.


An ‘additional push’ and a ‘challenge’

Despite concerns, at least some state agencies subject to the single-use plastic ban were already moving in the direction of phasing out plastics and otherwise attempting to reduce waste.

The University of Virginia had in place a sustainability plan to reduce its total waste footprint 70 percent by 2030 and “had already been pushing towards zero-waste events,” said Sustainability Director Andrea Trimble.

“This was an additional push,” she said. With EO77, she said, “we’re able to mobilize and implement [those waste goals] faster than we would have otherwise.”

Similarly, Nancy Heltman, visitor services director for Virginia State Parks, said the parks began selling boxed water and encouraging visitors to use refillable bottles in lieu of plastic ones two years ago. And Mr. Vanness said the Virginia Department of Corrections had been focused on sustainability “for quite some time,” running an extensive composting program and tracking waste.

The order has “asked us to enhance our program,” he said. “It’s actually sped us up a little bit from where we were and the goals that we’ve had.”

Still, members of several of the agencies The Mercury interviewed said it would be a challenge to meet the 2025 phaseout deadline.

“The overarching goal of this, I think, is wonderful,” said Cliff Edwards, director of facilities for the Frontier Culture Museum. “I think it’s a good idea for all of us, but I think it’s certainly going to take the allotted amount of time to get there.”

Among the biggest barriers cited by agencies were availability of alternatives and costs. The Frontier Culture Museum said that to fully implement a recycling program it would have to add staff. In some areas, Virginia State Parks has no nearby place to bring recyclables.

“We have communities where there isn’t any recycling,” said Ms. Heltman. “Many localities just can’t find an affordable way to continue to fund recycling programs.”

Also vexing for the parks: soda replacements.

“We still rely on drink machines in our parks and some vendors are not able, at this time, to switch out bottle dispensing machines for cans,” said Ms. Heltman. “Some drinks, like sports drinks, are typically available only in plastic bottles, but this seems to be changing.”

That’s a problem shared by the Department of Corrections, which stocks commissaries in correctional facilities where prisoners can buy items like chips and candy.

“Acceptable alternatives were hard to find in the commissary,” said Mr. Vanness. But, he added, “industry will provide alternatives. It’ll catch up with us and it will be easier as years go by.”

COVID-19 hospitalizations here total 300 in pandemic

Posted Monday,
November 22, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier County Public Schools report 9 more cases since Friday.
Vaccinations
65.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 46,750. Statewide, the rate stands at 73.4%.


58.6%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,472. Statewide, the rate stands at 64.4%.


93,267
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Sunday morning, up 1,048 from Thursday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 18 older — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine — are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 47 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient since Friday morning, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday.

The county’s cases total 7,365 since the pandemic started, with 300 hospitalized patients and 88 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 9 new cases Monday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 50, with 43 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 499 active cases — 365 among students and 134 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 155 students and 1 staff member in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 18. A week earlier, the school system had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Monday morning reported 4,110 new cases and 56 more deaths statewide since Friday morning. Virginia deaths total 14,548 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 957,570.

Virginia hospitals reported 846 infected patients in their beds Monday morning — down 1 from Friday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 74,405 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,834 cases, up 45 from Friday morning, and its 89th death.

Orange County, 3,952 cases, up 32.

Madison County, 1,074 cases, up 8.

Rappahannock County, 620 cases, up 4.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.9 percent statewide and 9 percent in the health district.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
November 22, 2021
0 ·

Thelma “Jennie” Allison

Posted Saturday,
November 20, 2021
0 ·

Betty J. Ross

Posted Saturday,
November 20, 2021
0 ·

5 Friday Fauquier factoids: Turkeys for 1st Responders

Posted Friday,
November 19, 2021
0 ·
172

Thanksgiving meal baskets distributed Thursday to Fauquier law enforcement officers, firefighters and medics.

Rev. Tyrone Green and his Heart's Delight Baptist Church in Catlett — along with nearby Mount Horab United Methodist Church, Oak Shade Baptist Church and Zoar Baptist Church — started “Turkeys for First Responders” five years ago.

“The sole purpose is to say, ‘Thank you’,” Rev. Green said as sheriff’s deputies, Remington and Warrenton police officers, state troopers and firefighter/medics from Catlett, Goldvein, Lois and Remington drove through the Warrenton Walmart parking lot to pick up their baskets.

Each basket contained a frozen turkey, potatoes, stuffing, corn and green beans.

Walmart provided a grant and discounts on the food.

Churches and businesses that have joined the effort include: The Bridge Community Church, the Catlett Assembly of God, County Chevrolet, Discovery Publications, Grace Episcopal in Casanova, Liberty United Methodist Church of Bealeton, the Midland United Methodist Church Men’s Club, the Mt. Carmel Baptist Church in Midland and Mt. Holly Baptist Church near Remington.

“I love this community,” said Ayonna Parham, a Virginia Beach native who has managed the Warrenton Walmart for three months.


22

Hours per week that the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles office in Warrenton provides walk-in service.

Customers can visit the office without appointments from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays.

The office serves customers by appointment only from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

DMV offices closed temporarily during the early weeks of the pandemic last year and opened for appointment only service in May 2020, while continuing to provide online and phone service. The offices on Oct. 5 of this year opened to walk-in customers on the alternating schedule.


7,844

Fauquier residents have received a COVID-19 vaccine booster.

That represents 11 percent of the county population.

Statewide, more than 1 million Virginians — or 11.7 percent of the population — have received booster shots.


20,000

Spectators that town officials anticipate — for planning purposes — to attend the Warrenton Christmas Parade, which will start at 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 3.

Getting into and out of Old Town — along with parking — will present challenges. Police Chief Mike Kochis recommends spectators arrive early and plan to linger downtown after the parade.

All 24 of his department’s officers will work the night of the parade, Chief Kochis said.

The Marshall Christmas Parade will take place at 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 4.

The Remington Christmas Parade will take place at 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4.

Middleburg’s Christmas Parade will take place at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 4.


41

Average travel time to work for a Fauquier commuter.

That’s about 1.4 times the average of 28.7 minutes in Virginia and 1.5 times the national average of 26.9 minutes.

Arizona Zimbro

Posted Friday,
November 19, 2021
0 ·

Best Bets: Santa’s Village and stage productions

Posted Friday,
November 19, 2021
0 ·
Contributed Photo
More than 50 artists, crafters and small businesses will sell their wares Saturday at the 37th Santa’s Village Arts and Crafts Fair in Warrenton.
Santa’s Village makes it official — the Christmas season has begun in Fauquier.

Birdhouses, handmade tree ornaments, jewelry and a wide range of other craft items and artwork will cover tables in the Fauquier High School cafeteria Saturday. The 37th Santa’s Village Arts and Crafts Fair supports the FHS After Prom Committee.

This weekend also features young people on stage at Fresta Valley Christian School and at Liberty High School, where Allegro’s production of “Annie the Musical” continues through Sunday.

Sky Meadows State Park and the Clifton Institute offer healthy outdoor activities, while Gloria’s in Warrenton features mountain music Friday night and a Led Zeppelin tribute band Saturday night. The Episcopal Churches in The Plains and Upperville also will host concerts.

“The Egg and I”
7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 19
2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 20
Fresta Valley Christian School
6428 Wilson Road, Marshall


"Chickens?" gasps Betty MacDonald when her husband Don buys a little farm in the mountains with no electricity or running water. "Who, us?" shriek teenage daughters, Anne and Joan, when asked to help. When they find themselves surrounded by peeping chicks, all sorts of adventures follow. We meet nosey neighbors, a pushy door-to-door saleswomen, and surprise guests from the city as this heartwarming comedy unfolds. Just when failure threatens the chicken farm, they realize that they are not quitters and learn to cope with The Egg. The 90-minute comedy has two acts. Tickets: $12 for adults, $9 for students and $40 for Saturday matinee family pass.


“Annie the Musical”
7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 19-20
4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21
Liberty High School
6300 Independence Ave., Bealeton


The Allegro Community Players present the family-friendly musical, which tells the story of orphans’ adventures in the 1930s. Tickets: $15 for adults; $10 for seniors and children ages 4 to 10.


Furnace Mountain Band
8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 19
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


Furnace Mountain features Aimee Curl on bass and vocals, Dave Van Deventer on fiddle and vocals, Morgan Morrison on guitar, bouzouki and vocals, and Danny Knicely on mandolin and fiddle. The band creates music that is at times lively and raucous, with spirited fiddle melodies weaving in and around the powerful rhythms of the bass and bouzouki, and other times poignant and poetic, with sublime vocal harmonies beautifully interpreting some of the oldest songs ever written. The band has performed throughout the world, from the Yangtze River in China to the banks of the Shenandoah River, where it’s the host band of Watermelon Park Festival, held on the site of one of the very first bluegrass festivals, in 1965. Furnace Mountain plays music from the American Appalachian traditions, as well as original compositions, and songs penned by their favorite song writing friends. Tickets: $25, free for children 12 and younger with parents or guardians. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Concessions bar available.


37th Annual Santa’s Village Arts and Crafts Fair
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 20
Fauquier High School Cafeteria
705 Waterloo Road, Warrenton

More than 50 crafters and small businesses offer a wide variety of gifts. Free admission. The event will include a food truck and a bake sale. Masks required for everyone. Booth fees benefit the Fauquier High School After Prom Committee.


Walk with a Naturalist
1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 20
The Clifton Institute
6712 Blantyre Road, Warrenton


With no specific agenda, participants will “amble and explore and see what we can find.” For adults and children 12 and older, accompanied by adults.
Registration requested. The 900-acre preserve also will host volunteers helping with invasive species removal from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.


A Walk Through Time — Geology Walk
10 to 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday Nov. 20
Sky Meadows State Park
11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane


Participants will walk a timeline of more than 4 billion years of geologic history and learn about the periods when life began, when it flourished and when catastrophic events affected life on the planet. The walk will explore how continental drift determined the history of our rocks, and how those billions of years of history gave rise to the Appalachian Mountains. Free. Parking fee: $10.


The Bridge — Led Zeppelin Tribute
8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 20
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


The four-member band from Winchester puts on a show of 1970s classic rock hits by Led Zeppelin, which sold more than 200 million albums. Tickets: $20, free for children 12 and younger with parents or guardians. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Concessions bar available.


An Evening of Moravian Music
5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21
Pre-concert talk at 4:30 p.m.
Trinity Episcopal Church
9108 John S. Mosby Highway, Upperville


The concert will feature selected traditional Moravian music, with a service of evensong to follow and then a reception with traditional Moravian fare. There will be a pre-concert talk about the history of Moravian music in America at 4:30 p.m. Free admission. Freewill offering will support Trinity’s music program.


“Fall Fanfare”
5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21
Grace Episcopal Church
6507 Main St., The Plains

Grace Church organist Jason Farris will join the Paragon Philharmonia’s brass quintet to perform a concert featuring the works of Albinoni, Scheidt, Berstein, Widor, Elleington and others. Tickets: $25 and $15 for students; children younger than 18 admitted free.


Other options


Warrenton Farmers Market
8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 20
21 Main St., Warrenton

Click here for more information.


Farmers Market
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 21
Archwood Green Barns
4557 Old Tavern Road, The Plains

Click here for more information.


Click here for calendar of events.

Thankful for those who teach, support our children

Posted Friday,
November 19, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
November 19, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier COVID-19 cases total 7,318, up 16 Friday

Posted Friday,
November 19, 2021
0 ·
Friday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
65.2%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 46,427. Statewide, the rate stands at 72.9%.


58.4%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,627. Statewide, the rate stands at 64.2%.


92,219
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning, up 348 from Wednesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 16 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,318 since the pandemic started, with 299 hospitalized patients and 88 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 2 new cases Friday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 42, with 35 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 490 active cases — 357 among students and 133 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 155 students and 1 staff member in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 18. A week earlier, the school system had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Friday morning reported 1,762 new cases and 23 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,492 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 953,460.

Virginia hospitals reported 847 infected patients in their beds Friday morning — the same number as Thursday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,837 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,789 cases, up 16 from Thursday morning.

Orange County, 3,920 cases, up 17.

Madison County, 1,066 cases, up 5.

Rappahannock County, 616 cases, up 1.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.8 percent statewide and 9.8 percent in the health district.

Appreciation for Sam Huff, modest NFL Hall-of-Famer

Posted Thursday,
November 18, 2021
0 ·
YouTube
Sam Huff records a video in 2010 to promote a thank-you concert for coal miners in Morgantown, W.Va. His father and brother worked in the mines.
The cover of Sam Huff’s 1988 autobiography, written with Leonard Shapiro.
By Leonard Shapiro
For FauquierNow

Almost anyone living in the Middleburg area for any length of time surely shook hands or exchanged greetings with long-time resident Sam Huff at the very least, and more than likely was soon engaged in a lively conversation.

Never mind that he’d once been a nationally famous, all-world pro football player, in fact a Hall of Fame middle linebacker many believe helped boost the game over Major League Baseball as America’s true sports pastime.

And never mind that he also was an iconic member of the Washington Football Team’s radio broadcasting crew for more than three decades, paired with his pal, fellow Hall of Famer Sonny Jurgensen, and play-by-play man Frank Herzog.

Around Middleburg, he was simply every-man Sam, an affable guy you might run into at the post office, in the Safeway, at the counter at the old Coach Stop restaurant where he ate breakfast every day. No airs, never pretentious, always friendly and willing to stop and chat, tousle your kid’s hair and even offer an autograph to anyone who asked, total strangers who stopped him on the street included.

Sadly, Sam Huff, our friend and long-time neighbor, died on Saturday, November 13. He was 87 and had suffered from dementia since 2013. There will be a memorial service to celebrate his life on Dec. 13 at 1 p.m. at the Middleburg Community Center.

I have little doubt that his 13 years of NFL head-knocking play, when he was a tackling terror for the N.Y. Giants and the Washington Redskins in the 1950s and ’60s, had plenty to do with the onset and worsening continuation of that dementia in the final years of his remarkable life.

In 1960, Sam was the subject of a CBS documentary narrated by Walter Cronkite called “The Violent World of Sam Huff.” He had a mike and radio transmitter in his helmet, and for the first time, viewers could actually hear the sound of a big-time hit, not to mention the colorful back and forth dialogue between opposing players on the field.

Many believe that show helped further popularize the league, a process that may well have begun two years earlier with Sam also front and center. In the 1958 NFL Championship game, the Baltimore Colts, led by quarterback John Unitas, rallied in the closing minutes to beat Sam’s Giants in what often has been called “The Greatest Game Ever Played.”

In 1988, I had the honor and the pleasure of collaborating with Sam, one of my own childhood heroes growing up a Giants fan on Long Island, to write his autobiography. We called it “Tough Stuff,” and I spent more than 40 hours interviewing him at his Middleburg home.

Out came a stream of remarkable stories — growing up in a West Virginia coal mining camp, college football at West Virginia University, his legend-ary NFL years, becoming a top executive for the Marriott Corp., the radio days, his foray, along with his long time significant other Carol Holden, into horse racing. And of course he spoke of his love affair with Middleburg, where they lived on a horsey property just outside of town.

Two days after his death, I wrote an appreciation column on Sam that appeared in The Washington Post. Over the next few days, I received a number of emails, Facebook replies and texts, more than a few sent by people who knew Sam as their Middleburg neighbor.

My favorite came from local resident Leah Thayer Ferguson, who admitted she did never really know much about sports save for horse racing the first time she ever met Sam. She began by writing, “Like everyone in Middleburg, I have Sam Huff stories.

“When I moved here 21 years ago, I had decided I wanted to create a local radio show,” she continued. “I looked in the yellow pages and saw ‘Middleburg Broadcasting,’ so I sent a letter. To my surprise, I quickly received a phone call from a man whose name I did not recognize asking me to come in for a chat.

“I went to Sam’s office behind the Exxon station. When I entered the reception area I saw photos of thoroughbred horses, so I thought to myself ‘this is nice, a horse person.’ Soon an attractive man came out and invited me into his office. There I noticed all these football photos so I said, ‘I see that you like horses, do you like football as well?’

“Sam’s jaw dropped. He stared at me for a moment, then replied ‘Well, yes.’

“I asked, ‘Did you ever play football?’

“With a smile on his face, he responded ‘a little.’

“Where did you play? ‘In high school, (pause) and then for the New York Giants and the Redskins.’

“At this point my thick brain realized that this guy must be a big deal. When I told this story to the men in my family they all gasped. From that point on, every time I saw Sam in town, often coming out of his beloved Coach Stop, he would walk up, grab my hand and say, ‘Let me introduce myself. I’m the football guy’.”

Leah Ferguson did, infeed, broadcast her radio show from Sam and Carol’s studio, and one day Sam went on as her guest.

“I asked Sam why he had pursued professional football rather than staying in West Virginia to work in the mines like the rest of his family,” she recalled. “He told me that working in the mines is very dangerous. I replied, ‘Sam, there are lots of people who consider getting knocked around on a football field dangerous.’ Sam responded, ‘I was always the knocker, never the knockee.’”

“Sam was unique, and he will be missed,” Leah Ferguson ended her touching email.

And especially so here in Middleburg, which he loved, in a town where he was beloved.

The writer, who lives near Marshall, retired in 2011 after decades as a sports reporter, columnist and editor at The Washington Post, where a version of this story originally appeared. He publishes Country Zest & Style magazine.



Bank of Clarke County plans branch in Warrenton

Posted Thursday,
November 18, 2021
0 ·
The Bank of Clarke County plans a branch in this building at 530 Blackwell Road in Warrenton — originally constructed for Falls Church-based First Virginia Bank, which BB&T acquired in 2003.
The Bank of Clarke County headquarters on Berryville’s Main Street.
We’re hoping to be up and running April 1, and we’d love for it to be earlier. Our people are jazzed to get going.
— Bank of Clarke County President/CEO Brandon C. Lorey
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The Bank of Clarke County plans to open a branch in Warrenton.

The Berryville-based bank has applied to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to establish a branch at 530 Blackwell Road — in the building that formerly housed a Middleburg Bank office, next to the CVS pharmacy.

It would join nine other banks that operate a total of 18 branches in Fauquier.

“We’re hoping to be up and running April 1, and we’d love for it to be earlier,” BCC President/CEO Brandon C. Lorey said in phone interview Thursday. “Our people are jazzed to get going.”

With total assets of $1.25 billion, BCC has 13 branches — in the City of Winchester and Clarke, Frederick and Loudoun counties, along with loan production offices in Tysons and Frederick, Md.

The Warrenton branch would be the bank’s first new one in about seven years, Mr. Lorey said.

“As a community banker, Warrenton and Fauquier County are, I think, still very interested in community banking,” he added. “It’s much more about the relationship than just the transaction.”

The bank’s growing number of wealth management clients in Fauquier helped spur the plan for expansion into this banking market, Mr. Lorey said.

“It’s contiguous to us and just makes sense,” he said. “I’m thrilled that we’re able to find this building — perfectly located.”

The 3,500-square-foot Warrenton branch that BCC would occupy has two drive-thru lanes and a drive-up ATM.

Constructed on 0.6-acre in 1980, the brick, single-story building originally housed a branch of Falls Church-based First Virginia Bank, which BB&T acquired in 2003. The 3,500-square-foot structure has two drive-thru lanes and a drive-up ATM.

Atlantic Union Bank, which acquired the Middleburg Bank, most recently operated a branch in the building at 530 Blackwell Road.

Growing steadily, the Bank of Clarke County has reported profits ranging from $2.5 million to $3.4 million each of the last five quarters.

Founded in 1881, the bank operates as a subsidiary of Eagle Financial Services Inc., which also has a large wealth management division.

That division has about $320 million “under management,” Mr. Lorey said.

Bank deposits in Fauquier totaled $3.6 billion on June 30, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

The Capital One branch in Warrenton accounted for $1.6 billion or 44.7 percent of the total.

Virginia National Bank’s six branches here (formerly The Fauquier Bank offices) accounted for $638.6 million, a 17.7 percent “market share.”

Truist (formerly BB&T and SunTrust), with four Fauquier branches ranked third with a 13.1 percent market share and $474.5 million in deposits.

“The Federal Reserve Board considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application, including the record of performance of applicant banks in helping to meet local credit needs,” the legal notice of BCC’s application says.

Contact Editor “Lou” Emerson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-270-1845.




County has 2 more deaths attributed to COVID-19

Posted Thursday,
November 18, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier residents received 348 doses of COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday, bringing the total to 92,219 shots.
Vaccinations
65.2%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 46,427. Statewide, the rate stands at 72.9%.


58.4%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,627. Statewide, the rate stands at 64.2%.


92,219
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning, up 348 from Wednesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 2 more deaths attributed to COVID-19 and 21 new cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,302 since the pandemic started, with 299 hospitalized patients and 88 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have10 new cases Thursday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 40, with 33 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 488 active cases — 355 among students and 133 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 155 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 18. A week earlier, the school system had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Thursday morning reported 1,895 new cases and 26 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,469 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 951,698.

Virginia hospitals reported 847 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning, down 32 from Wednesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,768 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,773 cases, up 17 from Wednesday morning.

Orange County, 3,903 cases, up 19, and its 61st death.

Madison County, 1,061 cases, up 10.

Rappahannock County, 615 cases, up 4.

As of Thursday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.5 percent statewide and 9.3 percent in the health district.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
November 18, 2021
0 ·

Catlett man faces charges for thefts in Bealeton

Posted Thursday,
November 18, 2021
0 ·
Juwan Todd, 23, of Catlett, faces multiple felony charges related to thefts from vehicles Tuesday night and Wednesday morning in Bealeton, according to the sheriff’s office.
A Fauquier sheriff’s detective on Thursday arrested and charged a 23-year-old Catlett man with multiple felonies related to a rash of thefts from parked vehicles in Bealeton a day earlier.

“A victim from the larceny had reported that someone had tried to use their credit card at a local business in the Bealeton area,” Lt. Steve Lewis wrote in a press release. “Fauquier sheriff’s detectives were able to review surveillance video and had identified a male suspect and a suspect vehicle.

“On November 17, the vehicle and male suspect was located in Warrenton and a traffic stop was conducted. The male suspect was identified as Juwan Todd.”

Mr. Todd faces charges of credit card theft, attempted credit card fraud, entering a vehicle to commit a crime, grand larceny of a firearm and petty larceny.

The thefts took place in Bealeton subdivisions off Catlett Road (Route 28).

The suspect remains in the Fauquier County Adult Detention Center, pending a bond hearing.

Clark W. “Corky” Crumbaugh

Posted Thursday,
November 18, 2021
0 ·

Sue Ellen Bratcher

Posted Wednesday,
November 17, 2021
0 ·

How to address school system turnover rate

Posted Wednesday,
November 17, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
November 17, 2021
0 ·

County has 38 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Wednesday,
November 17, 2021
0 ·
The number of COVID-19 patients in Virginia hospital beds has begun to rise again this week.
Vaccinations
65%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 46,324. Statewide, the rate stands at 72.6%.


58.4%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,578. Statewide, the rate stands at 64%.


91,871
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday morning, up 275 from Tuesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 38 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,281 since the pandemic started, with 299 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 7 new cases Wednesday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 30, with 27 among students and 3 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 478 active cases — 349 among students and 129 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 11. A week earlier, the school system had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Wednesday morning reported 2,532 new cases and 21 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,443 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 949,803.

Virginia hospitals reported 879 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning, up 30 from Tuesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,703 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,756 cases, up 31 from Tuesday morning.

Orange County, 3,884 cases, up 20.

Madison County, 1,051 cases, up 6.

Rappahannock County, 611 cases, up 3.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.7 percent statewide and 9.6 percent in the health district.


Study: Va. health insurance premiums still too high

Posted Wednesday,
November 17, 2021
0 ·
Stock Photo
The average cost of mid-tier insurance coverage in Virginia increased by nearly 60 percent between 2016 and 2021, according to the Joint Commission on Health Care report.
This is exactly what we do not want to happen in the marketplace or even in a single plan.
— Stephen Weiss, state health policy analyst
By Kate Masters
The Virginia Mercury

Nearly five years after changes to the Affordable Care Act, Virginia is still struggling to control the cost of premiums on the individual health insurance market.

A new report presented Tuesday to the state’s Joint Commission on Health Care found that the average cost of silver plans, a mid-tier option that generally includes some out-of-pocket costs, increased by nearly 60 percent between 2016 and 2021 — raising the monthly price by more than $200 for most customers.

The average cost of premiums for bronze and gold plans also went up, increasing a little more than 37 percent for bronze and 25 percent for gold.

Over the same period, enrollment in Virginia’s health care marketplace dropped by just over 20 percent. And prices remain high even though the cost of premiums has generally lowered over the course of the pandemic — driven by lower-than-normal use of medical services. Without state intervention, analysts warn that participation may continue to drop over the next few years as people struggle to afford higher premiums.

“Average adult costs have increased significantly,” said Stephen Weiss, a senior health policy analyst for the commission. “And even though there’s been some decline, it’s not enough to offset the impact of those increases.”

Most of the changes in enrollment, and costs, can be traced to actions on the federal level. In 2017, Congress eliminated the individual mandate, a key provision in the Affordable Care Act that required most Americans to enroll in health insurance. While its removal didn’t lower market participation as dramatically as many experts expected, the uncertainty drove up the cost of premiums — especially in Virginia, where the average monthly price of silver plans rose by more than $300 between 2017 and 2019.

The same year, the federal government stopped paying insurance companies directly for subsidies offered to many low-income customers. As a result, many carriers incorporated those costs into their premium rates. As prices began to rise, state analysts found that younger, healthier people began to leave the market.

Over the last five years, enrollment drops have been the sharpest among Virginians aged 18 to 34. Medicaid expansion has contributed to some of the losses as more low-income people qualify for government-provided insurance. But among residents who aren’t eligible for the program, Mr. Weiss said many have downgraded to bronze plans or left the health care marketplace altogether.

“Many were young adults just above the Medicaid income threshold or who weren’t eligible for tax credits,” he said. Those subsidies lower the monthly cost of premiums for adults within a certain income bracket, making health care more affordable.

The American Rescue Plan Act expanded those tax credits dramatically, leading thousands more Virginians to participate in the individual marketplace. If those subsidies continue, state analysts estimate more than 440,000 people will be enrolled by 2023 — roughly 108,000 more than there would be without the expanded benefits.

The problem, though, is that the act is set to expire next year, with no clear sign that Congress intends to extend the enhanced subsidies. If those end, it’s anticipated that many Virginians will once again forgo insurance on the exchange.

“It’s having an oversized impact on enrollment and affordability,” Mr. Weiss said. “ARPA has brought so many people into the market that ending it is expected to see most — if not all — of them leave due to cost.”

The potential loss of enrollment is a concern to the state for many reasons. For one, lawmakers want Virginians to be insured, and a lack of coverage could raise health care costs down the road if people forgo preventive care or don’t have coverage during medical emergencies.

But high participation is also key to stabilizing premiums long-term. If young, healthy people leave the market, insurers are left covering those who are older and sicker and can’t risk going without insurance. As a result, costs rise for those more vulnerable patients. In Northern Virginia, for example, the health carrier Group Hospitalization and Medical Services Inc. had the highest premiums in the state — and the country — in 2021. Mr. Weiss said it was due to declining enrollment overall and a higher number of members with more intensive medical needs.

“This is exactly what we do not want to happen in the marketplace or even in a single plan,” he said. Historically, unpredictable enrollment has also led insurers to pull out of the market. While a lack of competition doesn’t always lead to an increase in premium costs, state experts worry there could be a repeat of 2018, when Charlottesville was left with a single health insurer on the exchange and skyrocketing prices as a result.

Virginia lawmakers have already taken steps to lower the cost of premiums, including establishing a state-run health exchange in 2020 and passing a reinsurance program the following year. But neither initiative is expected to be fully implemented until at least 2023. In the meantime, analysts are recommending other policy options to further reduce costs and stabilize enrollment for individuals on the exchange.

The suggestions include a range of initiatives, from funding additional navigators to help connect Virginians with health plans to creating a public option plan that could boost market competition. Creating a statewide individual mandate is another option, as is eliminating a rule that allows existing insurers to charge tobacco users more for coverage (a policy that disproportionately impacts low-income Virginians, according to Mr. Weiss).

Regardless of which options lawmakers gravitate toward in the upcoming General Assembly session, the biggest impacts will likely come if the federal government also chooses to maintain expanded subsidies on the marketplace.

“If ARPA expires, the number of uninsured people in the state is expected to go back up to 748,000,” he said. That’s nearly 10 percent of the population — more than 100,000 more people than would be expected if the benefits continued past 2022.

Historic African-American land under contract

Posted Wednesday,
November 17, 2021
0 ·
Photo/David Bohrer
Chuck Kuhn and his family have preserved thousands of acres.
Preserving our county’s important history fits with our focus on helping preserve Virginia’s natural habitats, ecosystems and past.
— Chuck Kuhn
From InsideNoVa

The Kuhn family has put a contract on 42 acres in Saint Louis, just northwest of Middleburg and one of the first African-American townships in Loudoun County.

As part of the buying process, the Kuhns are conducting a study of the site, owned by the developer Mojax. If the purchase proceeds, the goal would be to place the land into conservation easement to protect it from development and preserve the open space for future generations.

“We are excited to be working with Board Chair Phyllis Randall, her fellow supervisors including Tony Buffington, and County Administrator Tim Hemstreet to help save and protect this historically significant and beautiful land. Saint Louis was bought by freed slaves following the Civil War. Preserving our county’s important history fits with our focus on helping preserve Virginia’s natural habitats, ecosystems and past,” Chuck Kuhn, owner of JK Land Holdings and JK Moving Services, said in a statement.

The 42 acres are slated to become 45 homes. With the potential sale to the Kuhns, the land — part of the township that dates to 1891 — instead would be protected and preserved. Conserving the land also would help ensure that nearby and long-time residents of Saint Louis — many of them descendants of the first African-American settlers — could afford to stay in their homes since it would prevent property tax increases in the area. In addition, the purchase would help preserve their family history.

Mr. Kuhn has won numerous awards, including being recognized by the Washington Business Journal as a Top Corporate Philanthropist and the Old Dominion Land Conservancy for his conservation efforts. Other ways that Mr. Kuhn, his family and his companies have protected landmarks and natural habitats include buying and conserving:

• 90-acre property that housed the former historic Middleburg Academy

• 500-acre Wolver Hill Farm in Middleburg

• Historic White’s Ferry in Maryland

• A 35-acre golf course in Leesburg that is being transformed into a park.

• 87 acres in Loudoun that have more native species of plants and wildlife indigenous to Virginia than is typical.

• 150 acres in Purcellville used to start the JK Community Farm, a charitable effort alleviating hunger by growing chemical free crops and livestock and donating them to local food banks.

• The historic and now fully renovated Middleburg Training Center.

• Several thousand acres near Loudoun’s historic villages.

The Kuhn family seeks land acquisitions through JK Land Holdings that can be sold, leased, developed, placed into conservation easement,\ or utilized by sister companies JK Moving Services and CapRelo, a global employee relocation and assignment management firm serving private and public sector clients. Over the past decade, they have strategically redeployed more than 22,000 acres of its purchases into conservation easement, ensuring vulnerable vistas and habitats are preserved and protected for future generations.

Stops Along the Way: Hunting great snow bear

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·

School board should have teacher training oversight

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·

I-66 land near The Plains sells for $2.95 million

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·
Totaling 130 acres, these two parcels near The Plains sold for $2.95 million.
This home on 14.3 acres along Airlie Road near Warrenton sold for $1.1 million.
Two parcels, totaling 130 acres, at Old Tavern Road and Interstate 66 near The Plains sold recently for $2.95 million.

The larger, 100-acre tract lies at the southwest quadrant of the interchange, about 1.5 miles from The Plains. The smaller, 30-acre parcel lies just across the interstate at the northwest quadrant of the interchange.

The land has rural agricultural zoning.

The Scott District property went on the market in December 2018 with an asking price of $5.9 million, according to Realtor.com. In September 2020, the price dropped to $3.7 million.

Tom Bellanca of Subdivisions Real Estate Inc. represented the seller and Seungwan Han Nbi Realty LLC represented the buyer.

The sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier property transactions, which also include:

• A six-bedroom home on 14.3 acres near Warrenton that sold for $1.1 million.

Built in 1939, the remodeled stone home has three bathrooms, a sunroom, a wraparound porch and a two-car garage.

The Airlie Road property also features a detached three-car garage with workshop and other outbuildings.

The Scott District property went on the market last December with an asking price of $1.3 million, according to Realtor.com.

Vanessa Sfreddo of Century 21 New Millennium represented the seller and Isa Abideen of Samson Properties represented the buyer.

• An 82-acre Whiffletree Farm near Warrenton that sold for $1 million within the same family.

The Virginia Outdoors Foundation holds a conservation easement on the Marshall District property.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Nov. 4-10, 2021:


Cedar Run District

Matthew K. Adkins to Surrey House LLC, 0.86 acre, Lot 9, Section B, Warrenton Estates Subdivision, 5287 Balls Mill Road, near Midland, $287,500.

NVR Inc. to Sarah and Gavin P. Duncan, Lot 61, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 6411 Redwinged Blackbird Drive, near Warrenton, $704,620.

Brian M. Byrne and Samantha Helms to Jacob A. and Jennifer Pearce, 2 acres, Lot F-8, Frances C. Russell Division, 9149 James Madison Highway, near Warrenton, $425,000.

Derek Vacco to James M. and Linda G. E. Berry, 2 acres, 11892 Bristersburg Road, near Bristersburg, $285,000.

Bryan A. and Kelly J. Decker to Linda J. and Robert J. Cunningham Jr., 5 acres, 7349 Foster Lane, near Nokesville, $860,000.

Aasef Shafik to Maten Shafik, one-half interest, 34.2 acres, 12285 Elk Run Church Road, near Midland, $642,442.

Liaqat A. Khan to Jonathan Ballard, 0.93 acre, Lot 3, Lakeview Subdivision, Catlett Road, Catlett, $192,500.

NVR Inc. to Samantha and William Handlin III, 0.76 acre, Lot 60, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 6410 Redwinged Blackbird Drive, near Warrenton, $878,680.

Thomas H. and Vicky L. Noland to Liliana C. Martins and Joel E. Grizzle, 2.5 ac res, 7081 Kirkwood Lane, Bealeton, $380,000.

Jay C. and Patricia E. Foley to Rose Juliano, 1.9 acres, 6766 Beach Road, near Warrenton, $465,000.


Center District

Deborah D. and Robert E. Flournoy Jr. to John M. Tulowitzki, Lot 64, Section 2, Oak Springs Subdivision, 723 Arbor Court, Warrenton, $340,000.

Nestor A. and Sarah A. Andino to Thomas J. and Courtney S. Gravely, 0.35 acre, Lot 30, Monroe Estates Subdivision, 590 Pineview Court, Warrenton, $680,000.

Ian A., Christopher N. and Peter D. Brown to Joseph Pohzehl, Townhouse 165-B, Phase 2, Leeds Square, 165-B Fairfield Drive, Warrenton, $220,000.

Lorrie R. and Michael A. Crockett II to Susan M. Metcalfe, Lot 195, Section 2C, Olde Gold Cup Subdivision, 712 Black Sweep Road, Warrenton, $605,000.

Alvin W. Jones to Matthew and Megan M. Lacey, Lot 21, Section 1, Menlough Subdivision, 98 English Chase Lane, Warrenton, $560,000.


Lee District

Douglas MM. Amaya to Steven M. and Sara V. Walker, Lot 128, Phase A, Section 3-A, Mintbrook Subdivision, 7609 Hancock St., Bealeton, $590,000.

Joel E. Grizzle II and Liliana C. Martins to Joshua S. Unkefer and Maria N. Blake, Lot 38, Phase 3, Rappahannock Landing Subdivision, 2240 Sedgwick Drive, Remington, $381,000.

Jie Y. Li to Barry Harp, Unit 6, Phase 2, Waverly Station Condominiums, 8617 Bud Court, Bealeton, $320,000.


Marshall District

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Adriell Y. Salazar-Pabon and Nery R.R. Gasparico, Lot 22, Phase 1-B, Carters Crossing Subdivision, 8657 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $371,775.

Tish M. Sams to Ryan M. and Natalie F. Fenn, 4.9 acres, 6564 Lovers Lane, near Warrenton, $735,000.

Patricia J. Payne to Lionel A.A. Canas, Unit 22, Section B, Marshall Townhouses, 8604 Ashby Court, Marshall, $225,000.

Sharma Real Properties LLC, Naresh K. Sharma as member, to Melanie Houston, 10.4 acres, 4675 Fiery Run Road, near Linden, $779,000.

Amir Ahmad to Philip Rice, 5.6 acres, Lot 31, Cliffs Mill on Carters Run Subdivision, 10181 Wesley Chapel Road, near Orlean, $550,000.

Deborah Teel to William J. Kirkland and Karen Waldron, 2.7 acres, 3871 Rectortown Road, near Marshall, $650,000.

Jeffrey Wilson, trustee, to Daniel King and Lauren Frumusa, 18.5 acres, 5786 Keyser Road, Hume, $855,000.

Lakeside Homes LLC, Devin T. Finan as managing member, to Kevin M. Armstead, 0.91 acre, Lot 5, Blue Hills Subdivision, 8101 Blue Hills Drive, near Warrenton, $967,125.

Rockwood Homes Inc. to David W. and Kristina N. Koerting, 4.3 acres, Lot 3, Parr Division, 7300 Twins Way, near Marshall, $600,125.

Whiffletree Farm Property LLC, Michael L. and Terry A. Straight as members, to Jesse S. and Elizabeth L. Straight, 82.2 acres, 8717 Springs Road, near Warrenton, $1,050,000.

Easton & Porter Group LLC, Dean P. Andrews as manager, to Becker Building Co. LLC, 2.2 acres, Lot 2, and 3.2 acres, Lot 3, John Mosby Highway, near Upperville, $800,000.

Easton & Porter Group LLC, Dean P. Andrews as manager, to Becker Building Co. LLC, 10 acres, John Mosby Highway, near Upperville, $790,000.

Lakeside Homes LLC, Devin T. Finan as managing member, to Ali S. and Faryal A. Hasan, 0.97 acre, Lot 1, Blue Hills Subdivision, 8065 Blue Hills Drive, near Warrenton, $992,310.

Jason A. Phillippe to Francis and Cherie Xavier, 5.4 acres, Lot 32, Cliffs Mill on Carters Run Subdivision, 10149 Wesley Chapel Road, near Orlean, $829,000.


Scott District

Cindy L. Mills estate, Scott H. Donovan as administrator, to Paul L. Bernier and Hanna R. Cobb, Lot 30, Section 2, Rolling Acres Subdivision, 5660 Red Maple Court, near Warrenton, $390,000.

Donald L. Nuckles Sr. estate, Donald L. Nuckles III as executor, to Katherine and Jason Brock, 3.4 acres, Lot 8-A, Springdale Subdivision, 7366 Woodlawn Lane, near Warrenton, $739,000.

Robert J. and Linda J. Cunningham to Greg and Kalli Chaney, Lot 16, Phase 4, Auburn Mill Estates Subdivision, 5434 Wemberly Drive, near Warrenton, $815,000.

John W.V. and Karina Lawton to Edgar J. Moran, 2 acres, 6749 Grays Mill Road, near New Baltimore, $485,000.

Robert and Stephanie Aldrich to Matthew and Christie Bohn Lot 21, Phase 7-A, Brookside Subdivision, 5141 Allison Marshall Drive, near Warrenton, $855,000.

Matthew R. and Lisa Pocius to Nicholas J.R. Stricklen and Madeline R. Howard, 1.8 acres, 5228 Winding Oak Lane, near Warrenton, $424,500.

Gregory J. and Rodney Q. Fitzhugh and others to MYCITY LLC, 14.3 acres, Airlie Road, near Warrenton, $1,100,000.

James E. and Regina K. Pumphrey to Miles H. Colson, 2.6 acres, 5260 Dapple Lane, near New Baltimore, $489,000.

The Plains LLC, Sarah E. Arnold as member, to 4572 Tavern Road LLC, 130.4 acres, 4570 Old Tavern Road, near The Plains, $2,950,000.

Mark Gray to P&L 21 LLC, 1.4 acres, 7348 John Marshall Highway, near The Plains, $210,000.

Gennaro and Kenna Cuomo to Frederick and Melissa Blair, Lot 10, Phase 4, Brookside Subdivision, 7119 Jocelyn Court, near Warrenton, $805,000.

Sharon L. Zavalanski, trustee, to Rodney Heiston, 17.9 acres, 6309 Pilgrims Rest Road East, near Warrenton, $500,000.

Fauquier COVID-19 cases total 7,243, up 14 Tuesday

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·
Tuesday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
64.9%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 46,253. Statewide, the rate stands at 72.4%.


58.3%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,542. Statewide, the rate stands at 64%.


91,596
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning, up 487 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 14 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,243 since the pandemic started, with 298 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 5 new cases Tuesday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 29, with 26 among students and 3 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 471 active cases — 343 among students and 128 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 11. A week earlier, the school system had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 1,210 new cases and 30 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,422 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 947,271.

Virginia hospitals reported 849 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, up 20 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,637 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,725 cases, up 15 from Monday morning.

Orange County, 3,864 case, up 2.

Madison County, 1,045 cases, up 2.

Rappahannock County, 608 cases, up 3.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.4 percent statewide and 9.5 percent in the health district.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·

Vincenzo Caporuscio

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·

Joan Poland Miller

Posted Tuesday,
November 16, 2021
0 ·

Marguerite J. Myers

Posted Monday,
November 15, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Health’s many contributions to community

Posted Monday,
November 15, 2021
0 ·

The Plains man killed Friday in vehicle crash

Posted Monday,
November 15, 2021
0 ·
A 40-year-old Fauquier man died Friday afternoon in a vehicle crash not far from his home, according to Virginia State Police.

Westbound on John Marshall Highway (Route 55), a 2019 Jeep Cherokee “failed to maneuver a curve, ran off the right side of the roadway and collided with a tree” near O’Bannon Road (Route 698), Sgt. Brent Coffey wrote in a press release. “The Jeep then caught fire.”

The driver, John V. Barr, 40, of The Plains, died at the scene of the crash as a result of his injuries. The accident, just more than a mile east of The Plains, took place at 1:55 p.m. Nov. 13, according to state police.

Mr. Barr wore a seatbelt.

Trooper T. Ralls continues to investigate the single-vehicle.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
November 15, 2021
0 ·

33 new COVID-19 cases, 1 more hospitalized here

Posted Monday,
November 15, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier County Public Schools report 2 new COVID-19 cases Monday morning.
Vaccinations
64.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 46,014. Statewide, the rate stands at 72%.


58.1%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,396. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.7%.


91,109
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Sunday morning, up 645 from Friday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
xFauquier has 33 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient since Friday morning, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,229 since the pandemic started, with 298 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 2 new cases Monday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 32, with 25 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 466 active cases — 338 among students and 128 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 11. A week earlier, the school system had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Monday morning reported 3,224 new cases and 71 more deaths statewide since Friday morning. Virginia deaths total 14,392 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 946,061.

Virginia hospitals reported 829 infected patients in their beds Monday morning, up 4 from Friday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,521 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,710 cases, up 19 from Friday morning.

Orange County, 3,862, cases up 29.

Madison County, 1,043 cases, up 13.

Rappahannock County, 605 cases, up 1.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.4 percent statewide and 9.5 percent in the health district.

What source provides the primary heat for your home?

Posted Monday,
November 15, 2021
0 ·

5 Friday Fauquier factoids: Teller, the $56-million man

Posted Friday,
November 12, 2021
0 ·
NFL star lineman and Liberty High graduate Wyatt Teller, Fauquier veterans and enhanced sheriff’s traffic safety patrols.
$56.8 million

The value of Liberty High School graduate Wyatt Teller’s four-year contract extension with the Cleveland Browns.

An all-pro offensive guard, Mr. Teller’s contract includes $28 million in guaranteed money, ESPN reported this week.

The 2013 LHS grad earned Virginia Group AA defensive football player of the year honors as a senior. Mr. Teller graduated from Virginia Tech, where he shifted to the offensive line.

The Buffalo Bills drafted him in the fifth round of the 2018 draft with the 166th overall pick. The Browns traded for the 6-foot-4, 314-pounder in 2019, and he became a star in Cleveland, earning second-team All Pro honors last season.

“Teller has been a stalwart at right guard for the Browns the past two seasons,” ESPN reported. “Thanks in part to Teller's emergence, Cleveland ranked third in the league in 2020 in rushing yards.”


6,100

Military veterans live in Fauquier County, according to the American Community Survey, conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Veterans account for 11.4 percent of the county’s total population.

Vietnam War-era veterans account for the largest number here, followed by those who served in the Gulf War era, 1990 to 2001.

Among the veterans in Fauquier, 1,359 have “service-connected disability ratings.”


301

Employees retired or resigned from Fauquier County Public Schools in 2020-21, according to a new report.

Excluding retirements, the school system had a “turnover rate” of 11.6 percent of the total workforce.

Among teachers and other “certified” employees, the separations totaled 178 versus 104 the previous year and 134 in 2018-19.

Retirements last year totaled 78.

The school board will review a 15-page turnover report Monday night.


3

Lions Clubs serve Fauquier County.

The Remington, Warrenton and Warrenton Sunrise clubs have more than 46,000 peers around the globe, with total membership of 1.4 million.

Founded in 1916 and headquartered in Illinois, Lions Clubs International focuses on community service.

Lions focus on sight conservation, hearing and speech conservation, diabetes awareness, youth outreach, international relations, environmental issues and other programs.


$254,000

Surplus funds from fiscal 2021 that the board of supervisors this week allocated to target speeding and other dangerous driving on county roads.

The funds will pay six months’ worth of overtime for two deputies on each 12-hour shift to focus on traffic safety.

“The deputies will be conducting targeted enforcement on all of the major roadways in the county,” the sheriff’s office said in its request for the funds.


John Vance Barr

Posted Friday,
November 12, 2021
0 ·

Best Bets: “Annie” musical and a variety of concerts

Posted Friday,
November 12, 2021
0 ·
Contributed Photo
Members of the “Annie the Musical” cast from Allegro, which opens a two-weekend run at Liberty High School.
The weekend offers a variety of musical entertainment in Fauquier.

The Allegro Community Players open a two-weekend run of “Annie the Musical,” a family-friendly show, at Liberty High Schools.

Musical performances range from a classical concert in The Plains to Led Zeppelin and Elvis in Warrenton.

Sky Meadows State Park offers a variety of activities Saturday and Sunday, while the Clifton Institute offers a nature walk for families with young students.


“Annie the Musical”
7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 12-13
4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14
Liberty High School
6300 Independence Ave., Bealeton


The Allegro Community Players will present the family-friendly musical, which tells the story of orphans’ adventures in the 1930s. Tickets: $15 for adults; $10 for seniors and children ages 4 to 10.


A Night of Elvis and the Andrews Sisters
8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 12
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


Elvis tribute artist Randoll Rivers and the Rivers Edge Band will join the Silver Belles, vocalists with the Silver Tones Swing Band, for a special concert. Tickets: $25, free for children 12 and younger with parents or guardians. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Concessions bar available.


Family Nature Walk
10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 13
The Clifton Institute
6712 Blantyre Road, Warrenton


The hike for families with children in Grades K-8 will focus of autumn changes in the 900-acre preserve’s landscape and migrating birds. Free. Registration requested.


Historic Mount Bleak House Tours
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 13-14
Sky Meadows State Park
11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane


A ranger or docent will share stories of those who’ve owned the 1840s house and how they shaped the history Sky Meadows. Parking fee: $10 per vehicle. The park this weekend also offers a volunteer opportunity to help restore a vernal pool and a hands-on cooking workshop Saturday, that requires registration and a fee of $165.


Grace Concert Series
5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14
Grace Episcopal Church
6507 Main St., The Plains


The classical concert will feature flutist Anthony Trionfo and pianist Albert Cano Smit. A reception will follow the concert. Tickets: $25 for adults, $15 for students. Patrons must show proof of COVID vaccination, or a negative COVID test result produced within 72 hours of the event.


The Bridge — Led Zeppelin Tribute
8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 13
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


The four-member band from Winchester puts on a show of 1970s classic rock hits by Led Zeppelin, which sold more than 200 million albums. Tickets: $20, free for children 12 and younger with parents or guardians. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Concessions bar available.


Other options


Warrenton Farmers Market
8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 13
21 Main St., Warrenton

Click here for more information.


Farmers Market
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14
Archwood Green Barns
4557 Old Tavern Road, The Plains

Click here for more information.


Click here for calendar of events.

Fauquier has 14 new COVID-19 cases on Friday

Posted Friday,
November 12, 2021
0 ·
Doses of COVID-19 vaccine administered to Fauquier residents soon will exceed 100,000.
Vaccinations
64.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Friday morning — a total of 45,838. Statewide, the rate stands at 71.6%.


58%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,334. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.6%.


90,464
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Friday morning, up 300 from Thursday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 14 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,196 since the pandemic started, with 297 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 6 new cases Friday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 30, with 24 among students and 6 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 464 active cases — 337 among students and 127 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 126 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 11. A week earlier, the school system had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Friday morning reported 1,466 new cases and 27 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,321 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 942,837.

Virginia hospitals reported 825 infected patients in their beds Friday morning, down 29 from Thursday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,369 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,691 cases, up 15 from Thursday morning.

Orange County, 3,833, cases up 13.

Madison County, 1,030 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 604 cases, up 2.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.3 percent statewide and 9.4 percent in the health district.


Veterans Day address: Nation must never forget

Posted Friday,
November 12, 2021
0 ·
History can serve to bring us all together. It shows us the fight spirit we need to keep this great country free.
The nation must never forget its defenders, a retired Army lieutenant colonel told her hometown audience on Veterans Day in Fauquier.

A 1971 Fauquier High graduate, Lt. Col. Linda Jolley rose through the ranks of the Army Nurse Corps, serving in combat and home-front hospitals, and held command-staff positions.

In her keynote address Thursday morning at the Fauquier Veterans Memorial, Lt. Col. Jolley used local stories and the sweep of history to extol the virtues of all who have served in the nation’s military. She also stressed the nation’s responsibility to its veterans, especially those who have suffered mental and/or physical wounds of war.

The Fauquier Veterans Council — American Legion Posts 72, 247 and 360, and VFW Posts 7728 and 9835 — hosted the annual ceremony, beginning at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month. The Veterans Day tradition goes back to the end of World War I.

Liberty High Schools Marching Band and JRTOC provided patriotic music, the color guard and 21-gun salute.

The text of Lt. Col. Jolley’s address:

Good morning. I am so proud to be a veteran standing before you today.

This Veterans Day, it is only fitting that we gather on the hill again to remember and honor the service and sacrifice of all veterans — living and deceased.

Our 29th president, Calvin Coolidge once said: “The nation which forgets its defenders will itself be forgotten.”

For in each veteran’s heart, he or she carries the memory of a comrade lost in battle or one lost way too soon upon return home. It could be from debilitating war injuries or Agent Orange diseases or respiratory ones like those from burn pit fires inhaled in Saudi Arabia, Iraq or Afghanistan. PTSD haunts our veterans and affects their ability to re-enter civilian life once they come home.

An obituary in The Fauquier Times on October 13th of this year honored Staff Sgt. Craig Aaron Pruden. He was a highly-decorated 9/11 veteran with combat deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. I marveled at the courage it took for his family to note in that obit that he lost his own battle to PSTD at the age of 33 on September 15, 2021. Just this past Tuesday, NBC news reported that we had lost 30,000 soldiers since 9/11 to suicide. That’s four times more than those we lost in combat. It was a shocking revelation.

In Sgt. Pruden’s obit, the family called on all veterans to do a “Buddy Check”
on those we know who are suffering from the effects of PSTD. The American Legion has made suicide prevention its top priority. They call upon all members to assist and have posted a number on their website: 1-800-273-8255.

The Buddy Check reminds me that during Desert Shield/Desert Storm, we nurses had Battle Buddies. It was someone we could trust with our lives. I don’t know how many times I had to wake up mine at 0-Dark-30 so she could go with me to the latrine, which was far from our sleeping tent. I could not imagine coming home without mine if she had been lost the times that bombs rained on the desert around us or when we were on the ground in Iraq.

Some of the sacrifices veterans make include missing the birth of a child or the death of a parent or a grandparent, the breakup of a marriage due to the enormous stress from too many separations, the financial toll from constant moves or the stress on children when have to leave their favorite schools, not to mention spouses who have to carry the burden at home alone.

The Veterans Affairs website defines a veteran of the United States as someone who has served on active duty in the armed forces. Veterans can also come from the public health service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrator or environmental science service. There are some great lesson plans on there for teachers to use, too.

It goes on to say that the military veteran is unique, in that he or she must have earned any character discharge other than dishonorable to be called a veteran. It doesn’t matter if they fought in a hot war zone or served during the Cold War. Their service matters.

It certainly mattered to the family of 1st Lt. Charles R. Anderson, of Warrenton, whose remains lie within hallowed grounds nearby. You might recall, he crashed a fighter jet in a field in Alberta, Canada, while on a training mission in 1957. It happened during the Cold War that followed Korea and before Vietnam began.

American Legion Post 360 is named for him and proud to c all him their hero. Larry Washington, our post commander, is a Vietnam vet. His purple heart is a testament to his sacrifice. I am proud to stand next to him today.

But, I would be remiss if I did not mention another veteran so dear to me today. It is my husband, retired 1st Sgt. Paul D. Jolley, whom you all know as “Dave,.” He supported me continually throughout my own career long after his call to service ended. I am here today because of him. Thanks, Dave. Thanks, Larry, for your service.

I like to smile when I say we veterans have a particular set of skills I think it must be in our DNA.

Consider a fella named Clay Preston Rankin from just down the road in Midland. Capt. Rankin earned a Silver Star and an Italian War Cross for his serve during World War I as a U.S. Army infantryman. His son, Staff Sgt. James Rankin is our own local hero. I know his is proud to wear that paratrooper’s uniform he wore in Korea back in 1951. His actions on that frozen Korean peninsula earned him two Bronze Stars. There was no backing down for paratrooper Jim Rankin. He did what his country asked of him and more. Than you, Jim, for your service.

And history teaches us that women can be mighty good warriors, too. There was no backing down for a woman known as Harriet Tubman. She was called the Moses of her people, who is more widely known as the conductor of the Underground Railroad. She also served as chief nurse for two years in the hospital at Fort Monroe that treated the contraband of the Civil War. Although she did not fight as a soldier, she served as a cook and spy for the Union Army. For her service, she was awarded a pension. I love history because of its inclusive on of people like her.

History can serve to bring us all together. It shows us the fight spirit we need to keep this great country free.

The World War I vets are gone now and, out of the 16 million who served in World War II, the Department of Veterans Affairs states that fewer than 240,000 remain. They die at a rate of 245 a day. It’s estimated that by 2045, they will all be gone. We must hear their stories.

Now, you may wonder: What about the sacrifies of our women vets?

I see some of them here today, like Liza and Joanne. The Defense Department states that women now make up 20 percent of the Air Force, 19 percent of the Navy, 15 percent of the Amy and 9 percent of the Marine Corps. Ever since Defense Secretary Carter Ash announ ced December 3, 2015, that women can serve in front-line combat posts, we have been steadily taking on those jobs that put us right alongside the men on the front lines.

Women, too, bear the wounds of war. Consider that Instagram post from Sgt. Nicole Gee, showing her tenderly cradling that Afghae tn baby while dressed in full battle rattle at the Kabul airport during the evacuation process there. I can’t get over how young, how sweet that Madonna-like smile on here face was a she sat, possibly dreaming of starting her own family once she returned home to her Marine Corps husband. We all know whe paide the ultimate sacrafice for this country, along with another woman, Sgt. Johanny Pichardo and 11 other servicemen that date in August, whe a suicide bomber struck.

Bu, oh, that one photo showe the world our humanity in the face of extreme danger. It was what defines us as a fighting force and it should make the rest of the world shiver at its awesomeness.

I can say it truly takes a village to raise a child. I remember my village. In 1959, as a 6-year-old child, I atended that one-room Rosenwald School in Orlean. I was still in my Dick and Jane first-grade reader full of one-syllable words. It was there I learned to recite the Pledge of Allegiance in Mrs. Ethel Anderson’s class, where she taught Grades 1 through 7. I could pronounce the pledge OK, though I did not then know what it meant. I remember stumbling over the word, “indivisible.”

Today, I am reminded that in 1858, a young senator from Illinois famously gave that house-divided-against-itself-cannot-stand address in the state capitol. After the Civil War ended, the dream of an E Pluribus Unum — “out of many one” — was that of our nation’s 16th president. That same man was Abraham Lincoln. His words should still resonate down those halls of Congress todfay as we seek to build back even stronger than before 9/11.

Our Constitution has framed the foundation of this house we call America, but our veterans have helped built it and fortify it to keep it strong. We shall never forget our veterans, our defenders of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. So let us continue to honor and life up the defenders of our nation, so that our nation, like them, will never be forgotten.

God bless you all. God bless our veterans, and God bless America.

Clara May Reese

Posted Thursday,
November 11, 2021
0 ·

Ronkeith “Keifus” Kirtley

Posted Wednesday,
November 10, 2021
0 ·

Biz Buzz: Chamber hosts gala for 100th anniversary

Posted Wednesday,
November 10, 2021
0 ·
Photo/Patrick Nye
The Silver Tones will perform at the Fauquier County Chamber of Commerce 100th Anniversary Gala.
Chamber’s 100th Anniverary Gala Nov. 18

The Fauquier Chamber of Commerce will celebrate its 100th anniversary with a gala Thursday night, Nov. 18, at the Great Marsh Estate near Bealeton.

Starting at 5:30 p.m., the event will feature a social hour, dinner, the annual awards ceremony, the annual meeting and dancing with the Silver Tones swing band performing.

Tickets are $100 per person, with sponsorships available.

For more information, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call 540-347-4414.

Formed in 1921, the organization serves as “a voice for business,” with activities focused on education and training, economic development, legislative affairs, networking and promotion of tourism.

Marianne Clyde chairs a 17-member board of directors that sets policy for the chamber, which recently hired Alec Burnett as its executive director.


CDC honors Remington Drug Co.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recognized the Remington Drug Co. for its Diabetes Prevention Program.

“As your local pharmacy in Remington, our purpose is to improve the health of those within our community,” pharmacy co-owner Travis Hale said. “One way we do this by offering our Diabetes Prevention Program. In this year-long program that was created by the CDC, patients learn life-long habits to delay the development of diabetes and how to overcome obstacles while supporting one another’s successes.

“Our Diabetes Prevention Program is hosted by our very own pharmacists and lifestyle coaches- Wendy Lear and Margaret Rowe. Without their dedication to the program, Remington Drug wouldn’t have received this recognition.”

The CDC reported 34.2 million people living with diabetes – or 10.5 percent of the U.S population — living diabetes in 2020. Of those, 7.3 million remain undiagnosed and another 88 million adults have prediabetes.

“The good news is that Type 2 Diabetes is preventable, and prediabetes can be reversed if steps are taken to change diet and exercise,” Mr. Hale said.

For information about the Diabetes Prevention Program, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).


Clinic/pharmacy decision postponed

The Warrenton Town Council on Tuesday delayed a decision on a special use permit for construction of a walk-in medical clinic and pharmacy with a drive-thru window.

Although supportive of the $2.6-million proposal, the council voted, 7-0, to consider it in December after the town staff addresses concerns about traffic at Blackwell Road and Walker Drive and shared vehicle access with the Warrenton Professional Center.

Piedmont Urgent Care and an extension of the Remington Drug Co. would occupy the 7,500-square-foot, 1-1/2-story brick building.

Dr. Steve von Elten and his partners would build and own the new structure on a 0.6-acre lot. Dr. von Elten and other physicians have practiced in the larger building since 1997.

The town planning commission in September unanimously recommended council approval of the special use permit.


Affordable housing proposals sought

The Rappahannock-Rapidan Regional Commission seeks proof of concept submissions from developers for projects that would increase the number of affordable housing units in the region.

The proof of concept submission starts the overall application process and allows interested developers to provide an overview, goals, objectives and intended outcomes of proposed projects, as well as the anticipated funding request, number of units, organizational capacity, targeted income levels and project location.

That information will enable the regional commission to determine the overall interest in the available funding and to identify those projects most suitable for funding. Selected projects will advance to a second application phase that will allow developers to submit detailed timelines, scopes of work, action plans and to produce additional financial information for funding consideration.

“We are pleased to announce this process and to begin identifying partners that will increase the number of affordable housing units in the region,” RRRC Executive Director Patrick Mauney said. “The grant received from Virginia Housing is timely, with the commission’s Regional Housing Study completed earlier in 2021, and our local government and housing partners indicating a growing need for diverse housing options across income levels in the region.”

The regional commission, which includes Fauquier, received a $2 million grant to support development of affordable housing.

For more information on the RRRC Housing Development Program, visit rrregion.org/housingdevelopment.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
November 10, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier COVID-19 cases total 7,162, up 11 today

Posted Wednesday,
November 10, 2021
0 ·
Wednesday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
63.7%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 45,338. Statewide, the rate stands at 70.7%.


57.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,227. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.4%.


89,242
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning, up 128 from Monday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 11 new COVID-19 cases and another hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,162 since the pandemic started, with 296 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 2 new cases Wednesday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 18, with 12 among students and 6 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 451 active cases — 324 among students and 127 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 4. A week earlier, the school system had 75 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Wednesday morning reported 1,407 new cases and 36 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,261 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 939,783.

Virginia hospitals reported 877 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning, up 20 from Tuesday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,271 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,665 cases, up 16 from Tuesday morning.

Orange County, 3,808, cases up 12.

Madison County, 1,026 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 601 cases, up 3.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.5 percent statewide and 9.4 percent in the health district.

PATH Foundation awards $1.5 million in grants

Posted Wednesday,
November 10, 2021
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Hero’s Bridge, which provides support for veterans 65 and older, received a $50,000 “Flexible Funding” grant from the PATH Foundation.
With this iteration of our Flexible Funding grant cycle, we’re continuing our support of local organizations doing important or urgent work in the community.
— PATH President/CEO Christy Connolly
The Warrenton-based PATH Foundation has awarded more than $1.5 million in Flexible Funding grants to 47 organizations in the region.

The foundation offered up to $75,000 in unrestricted general operating support for 501(c)3 nonprofit organizations. The funding cycle prioritized organizations and populations most in need, PATH President/CEO Christy Connolly said.

“With this iteration of our Flexible Funding grant cycle, we’re continuing our support of local organizations doing important or urgent work in the community,” Ms. Connolly said.

All grantees have overall mission statements or programs that intersect with the PATH Foundation’s four priority areas: Access to health, childhood wellness, mental health and senior services.

“In addition, all grantees demonstrated their alignment with the mission and values of the PATH Foundation,” the organization said in a press release.

The foundation, funded with proceeds from the 2013 sale of Fauquier Health to a publicly-traded corporation, has an endowment of about $250 million. Since its founding, PATH has made more than $48 million in grants and other investments in Fauquier, Culpeper and Rappahannock counites.

The 2021 Flexible Funding recipients:

• Afro-American Historical Association of Fauquier County: $50,000

• American Red Cross of Central Virginia: $7,700

• Boys & Girls Club of Fauquier: $50,000

• Bull Run Mountains Conservancy Inc.: $25,000

• CASA Children's Intervention Services: $40,000

• Catholic Charities Diocese of Arlington: $50,000

• Community Touch: $50,000

• Culpeper Baptist Church: $50,000

• Culpeper Community Development Corporation: $50,000

• Culpeper Winter Heat Shelter: $17,000

• Family Futures: $7,000

• Fauquier Community Child Care Inc.: $50,000

• Fauquier Education Farm: $30,000

• Fauquier Family Shelter Services Inc: $50,000

• Fauquier FISH: $50,000

• Fauquier Habitat for Humanity: $50,000

• Fauquier Youth Livestock Advisory Council: $50,000

• Friends of the Rappahannock: $25,000

• Girls on the Run Piedmont: $20,000

• Goose Creek Association: $10,000

• Headwaters Foundation: $50,000

• Hero's Bridge: $50,000

• Hope Heals Foundation: $15,000

• Hospice Support of Fauquier County: $18,835

• Minority and Veteran Farmers of the Piedmont: $30,000

• Morgan's Message Inc.: $20,000

• Northern Virginia 4-H Educational and Conference Center: $11,000

• People Helping People: $30,000

• People Incorporated of Virginia: $50,000

• Piedmont Dispute Resolution Center: $40,000

• Piedmont Environmental Council: $25,000

• Piedmont Regional Dental Clinic Inc.: $30,000

• Rainbow Therapeutic Riding Center: $12,500

Click here for information about PATH Foundation grants.


FISH receives award from Master Gardeners

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·

Veterans Day ceremony Thursday morning at 11

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·

Scathing audit details Va. jobless benefits failures

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·
It’s clear that additional oversight and assistance is needed.
— Lauren Axselle, General Assembly Joint Legislative Audit Review Commission analyst
By Ned Oliver
The Virginia Mercury

Virginia’s failure to deliver unemployment benefits in a timely manner left thousands of jobless Virginians waiting months for aid during the pandemic.

Now, a scathing audit says much of the blame lies with poor management coupled with limited oversight by Gov. Ralph Northam’s administration.

“It’s clear that additional oversight and assistance is needed,” Lauren Axselle, a legislative analyst with the General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Audit Review Commission, told lawmakers Monday, recommending the legislature expand its role rather than rely on the executive branch and the U.S. Department of Labor.

Throughout the pandemic, the Virginia Employment Commission, which administers the program, and Gov. Northam’s administration, which oversees the agency and appoints its leadership, downplayed widespread problems or blamed external factors outside their control.

Instead, the report — based on extensive interviews with experts, agency staff and employees — describes a perfect storm of more than a decade of poor management colliding with an unprecedented pandemic.

A massive IT upgrade was eight years behind schedule. The agency was understaffed to meet even pre-pandemic workloads. The staff the agency did have was less effective because many were dedicated to tasks that modern computers long ago made obsolete, like mailing forms and letters and manual data entry.

“We are so heavily reliant on paper … We have paper in every nook and cranny,” the report quotes one unnamed employee saying.

That led state officials overseeing the program to conclude that they were being underfunded by the federal government at the same time as they were receiving more per-claim than most other states.

And in either case, the report says, management and administration officials took no serious steps to increase staffing until more than a year into the pandemic. And the report says Gov. Northam’s administration blocked some early steps explored by the agency.

Among other things, the report says Gov. Northam’s cabinet did not grant an early request to set aside state hiring requirements to fill positions faster. That meant, for example, that part-time employees the agency wanted to move quickly into full-time roles had to first reapply for the position. An effort to bring in state employees from other agencies to help was limited to a voluntary request that drew no takers, the report says.

The agency didn’t undertake serious steps to bring in outside help until more than a year into the pandemic, when hundreds of contract-adjudication staffers were finally hired. Meanwhile, the backlog of claims had grown to nearly 100,000.

“Given VEC’s critical role during severe increases in unemployment — and the operational challenges that arise from them — future secretaries of labor must effectively fulfill their role to ensure the agency is performing adequately,” the report states.

In some instances, it wasn’t clear that VEC leadership was aware of the extent of the problem, noting that monthly performance reports delivered to Commissioner Ellen Marie Hess did not “include information about UI claim quality or timeliness or call center responsiveness.”

The report also observes that a hands-off management style meant many departments, including the call centers where fewer than 3 percent of calls were actually being answered, were not subject to performance expectations or goals. The report notes the agency also has no internal performance goals for fraud investigations.

The auditors suggested future governors should take a more decisive, hands-on role. And they suggested the legislature create its own subcommittee dedicated to overseeing the program and making sure reforms are implemented.

Neither Ms. Hess nor Gov. Northam’s secretary of labor, Megan Healy, attended Monday’s presentation. Auditors told lawmakers that they had been advised not to participate due to pending litigation surrounding the long delays for benefits.

In statements and letters, Ms. Hess continued to defend the agency and did not address any potential management failings.

“I appreciate your recognition of the extremely dedicated public servants of the Virginia Employment Commission and the enormous volume of work that they produced in response to the COVID-19 pandemic,” Ms. Hess wrote.

Ms. Healy wrote in a two-paragraph letter that she looks forward to “collaborating on the implementation of your recommendations, the protection of Virginia’s workers, and the reform of this long-neglected but incredibly important system.”

In a statement, she thanked the legislature for the report and emphasized signs of improvement in recent months. “Call times are down to less than two minutes and adjudications are now back to pre-pandemic wait times. VEC’s new IT system will be live next week, and we will continue to work on the backlog of appeals.”

Stops Along the Way: “We came so close, so very close”

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·

Aubrey “Nolie” Edwards

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·

County has 26 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Tuesday,
November 9, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier County Public Schools have 16 “active cases” Tuesday morning, down 5 from Monday morning.
Vaccinations
63.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 45,318. Statewide, the rate stands at 70.6%.


57.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,205. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.4%.


89,114
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning, up 389 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 26 new COVID-19 cases and another hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,151 since the pandemic started, with 295 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 1 new case Tuesday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 16, with 10 among students and 6 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 449 active cases — 322 among students and 127 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 4. A week earlier, the school system had 75 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 1,448 new cases and 35 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,225 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 938,376.

Virginia hospitals reported 857 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, up 51 from Monday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,165 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,639 cases, up 16 from Monday morning.

Orange County, 3,796, cases up 9.

Madison County, 1,022 cases, up 2.

Rappahannock County, 598 cases, unchanged.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stands at 5.6 percent statewide and 8.9 percent in the health district.

Robert N. Armstrong

Posted Monday,
November 8, 2021
0 ·

Based on your experience, how would rate the county registrar’s office and voting officials’ performance in conducting the recent general election?

Posted Monday,
November 8, 2021
0 ·

138-acre horse farm near Atoka sells for $7.6 million

Posted Monday,
November 8, 2021
0 ·
Amber Hill Farm, along the south side of Route 50 near Atoka west of Middleburg, sold for $7.6 million.
This home in the Snow Hill neighborhood sold for $1.15 million.
This home in the Brookside neighborhood sold for $1.14 million.
A 138-acre horse farm in Northern Fauquier near Middleburg sold recently for $7.6 million.

Amber Hill Farm features a six-bedroom, 7-1/2-bath stone manor house that dates to 1839. Along the south side of Route 50, the farm has two other homes, stables, outbuildings, a pond, paddocks, riding rings and a swimming pool.

The Virginia Outdoors Foundation holds a conservation easement on the land.

The Scott District sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier real estate transactions.

The list includes four additional seven-figure transactions:

• Three office condos at Vint Hill, totaling about 17,000 square feet, sold for $5.48 million. The condos are in the building, constructed in 2008, at 6801 Kennedy Road.

• Seven building lots in the Warrenton Chase Subdivision, east of town, sold for $1.6 million.

• A home on 2.1 acres in the Snow Hill Subdivision near New Baltimore sold for $1.15 million.

Built in 1997, the brick house has four bedrooms, 4-1/2 baths, a pool, a three-car garage and a whole-house generator.

The home went on the market Sept. 10 with an asking price of $1.5 million, according to Realtor.com.

Rachel Shepherd with Spring Hill Real Estate LLC represented the seller and Allie Welch Tylor of Redfin represented the buyer.

• A five-bedroom home on an 0.95-acre lot in the Brookside Subdivision sold for $1.14 million.

Built in 2006, the 8,900-square-foot house has 5-1/2 bathrooms, a large deck and a three-car garage.

The house went on the market in August with an asking price of $1.2 million, according to Realtor.com.

Louise Lamy of Long & Foster in Manassas represented the seller and Realty2u Inc. represented the buyer.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Oct. 28-Nov. 3, 2021:


Cedar Run District

NVR Inc. to Jefferey A. and Grace A. Sledge, 0.7 acre, Lot 74, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3939 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $803,490.

Charles J. Chavis to Irene H. Perez, 2.8 acre, 2 acres and 0.12 acre, 9205 Old Dumfries Road, Catlett, $125,000.

Jeffery Colburn to Philip and Susanna Bothwell, 3.1 acres, Lot 2, Coffee Hill Subdivision, 4527 Shulls Lane, near Catlett, $825,000.

Kathleen M. Giordano to Marjorie A. Alexander, 0.34 acre, 3259 Old Catlett Road, Catlett, $225,000.

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as managing member, to NVR Inc., 0.59 acre, Lot 77; 0.57, Lot 78; 0.66 acre, Lot 79; 0.72 acre, Lot 107; 0.57 acre, Lot 114; 0.6 acre, Lot 115, and 0.61 acre, Lot 118, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, near Warrenton, $1,604,000.

Oak Shade Baptist Church to Next Generation Properties Catlett LLC, 0.68 acre, 3576 Catlett Road, Catlett, $241,500.

NVR Inc. to Cory J. and Shannon M.N. Sutphin, 0.57 acre, Lot 73, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3949 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $690,425.

Amy Williams and Pamela G. Williams to Home Based Investments LLC, 2 acres, 4984 Midland Road, southeast of Midland, $50,000.


Center District

Lyle E. Walker and Yongjiao Quan to Zachary M. and Ellen R. Diekel, 0.38 acre, Lot 41, Phase 2, The Reserve at Moorhead Subdivision, 144 Pinnacle Court, Warrenton, $670,000.

Allison R. and Fernando Juarez Jr. to William Daniels LLC, 0.44 acre, Lot 2, Hanback Subdivision, 539 Old Meetze Road, Warrenton, $355,000.

Zachary and Meghan N. Romero to Tatiana Cooper, Townhouse 158-C, Phase 2, Group 13, Leeds Square, 158-C Fairfield Drive, $245,000.

Paula Todd estate, James L. Todd as executor, to Ryan Corder and Thom Payton, Lot 10, Monroe Estates Subdivision, 176 Meadowview Lane, Warrenton, $675,000.


Lee District

Cori A. Stendback to Jeremiah J. Kelliher III, Unit G, Building 1, Cedar Lee Condominiums, 11260 Torrie Way, Bealeton, $165,000.

Roland T. Doucet to Mynor A.P. Giron Sr. and Nora R.P. Lopez, Lot 64, Phase 1, Riverton Subdivision, 12236 Piney Lane, Remington, $550,000.

Misas Invest LLC, Mihai Hriscu as manager, to Jeffrey L. Potter, 2,405 square feet, Lot 98, Phase 4, Wankoma Village Subdivision, 7620 Wankoma Drive, Remington, $264,900.

David L. and Jo Ann Drake to Brandon J. and Jamee L. Heflin, 25 acres, 7433 Highgate Lane, Bealeton, $100,000.

Max and Monica Droguett to Juvenal V. Navia and Maribel G. Quintero, Lot 138, Section K, Meadowbrooke Subdivision, 10946 Blake Lane, Bealeton, $339,000.


Marshall District

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Carlos B.G. Moreno and Hastrid P. Barrientos, Lot 23, Phase 1-B, Carters Crossing Subdivision, 8659 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $369,055.

Pamela A. Kalinsky, trustee, to Ignacio Gonzalez and Araceli Valdovinos-Garcia, 1 acre, 4030 Whiting Road, east of Marshall, $425,000.

Brian M. and Rae V. Hall to John Chaplin, 1.5 acres, 8440 Fox Springs Lane, near Orlean, $418,900.

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Michelle I. and James Tracy, Lot 27, Phase 1-B, Carters Crossing Subdivision, 7045 Osborn Court, Marshall, $514,360.

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Courtney N. and Roberto C. Gonzalez, Lot 29, Phase 1-B, Carters Crossing Subdivision, 7049 Osborn Court, Marshall, $506,925.

Rebecca Dawson to Ramona Savu, 1.2 acres, Lot 72, Phase 2, Waterloo North Subdivision, 78756 Wellington Drive, near Warrenton, $880,000.


Scott District

Costa Apostolakis and Pamela Wood to Michael P. and Diana W. Dowdy, Lot 43, Phase 3, Snow Hill Subdivision, 7716 Old Forest Lane, near Warrenton, $1,150,000.

Garlanda and James Johnston to Pradeep and Rekha Sharma, Lot 93, Phase 6, Brookside Subdivision, 4474 Corral Road, near Warrenton, $1,145,000.

Ingens LLC, Jay M. Hebert as manager, to Pretium at Vint Hill LLC, Condo Units 301, 302 and 303, 6801 Kennedy Road, Vint Hill, $5,489,478.

Mary B. Schwab and Thomas J. Radtke III, trustees, to Amber Hill Farm at Stoneleigh LLC, 134.5 acres, 1 acre and 2.7 acres, 1485 Stoneleigh Lane, near Middleburg, $7,600,000.

Dien V. Nguyen to Alisha Caudill Herbert, 0.76 acre, Lot 16, Parramore Subdivision, 6700 Kelly Road, near Warrenton, $430,000.

Colored troops honored at Culpeper execution site

Posted Monday,
November 8, 2021
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Jackie Llanos Hernandez
Members of the 23rd U.S. Colored Troops, a living history organization in Spotsylvania County, and descendants of the 27th U.S. Colored Troops unveil a monument in honor of fallen soldiers.
We don’t know their identities, nor do we know precisely where they’re buried, but we know what happened and that they lay nearby.
— Howard Lambert, The Freedom Foundation of Virginia president
By Jackie Llanos Hernandez
The Virginia Mercury

More than 157 years ago, Confederate soldiers captured and executed three soldiers of the United States Colored Troops in Culpeper County.

On Saturday morning, a foundation dedicated to Civil War history unveiled a monument honoring the men’s service.

“We don’t know their identities, nor do we know precisely where they’re buried, but we know what happened and that they lay nearby,” said Howard Lambert, founder and president of The Freedom Foundation of Virginia. “This is dedicated to those men, who made the ultimate sacrifice.”

The granite obelisk is the first monument dedicated to the regiments in Culpeper and comes amid a nationwide reevaluation of Civil War memorials and monuments, which in the South have traditionally focused on valorizing the Confederacy.

The Freedom Foundation, which focuses on the contributions and legacy of Culpeper born U.S. Colored Troops, built the monument in collaboration with the Civil War Trails and the Piedmont Environmental Council.

The foundation also erected markers documenting a church and a tavern built by Willis Madden, a free Black man who lived in the area. Madden’s Tavern had a general store, blacksmith, wheelwright shop and sleeping quarters for travelers, making it a perfect resting place for troops from both sides. Ebenezer Baptist Church was one of the first post-Civil War Black churches in the area.

The unveiling began with a procession by the 23rd Regiment United States Colored Troops, a living history organization in Spotsylvania County.

Following remarks from Mr. Lambert and PEC President Chris Miller, who emphasized the importance of working together across divides in today’s political climate, the markers were unveiled one by one by members from each group that was honored. Bill Madden, a descendant of Willis Madden, said it was remarkable that the tavern still stands.

Civil War historian John Hennessy said the site is more than just trail markers — part of the process of change in how the past is perceived. Mr. Henessy compared the work of public history to a mirror, which sometimes reflects ugliness within. However, he said we must learn about the ugliness of our history.

After Mr. Hennessy’s speech, members of the 23rd USCT and descendants of the 27th USCT that joined the Army of the Potomac and marched in Culpeper removed the tarp covering the obelisk and laid three wreaths at its base.

As the obelisk was unveiled, other members of the 23rd USCT released volley fire toward the empty field behind the monument, and Dave Boltz, a retired senior master sergeant of the U.S. Air Force, played taps, a call to remember those who gave their lives in service.

Attendees of the ceremony spent the morning learning about the history of the land. Michelle Tutt of Culpeper said it is important to share the history that she wasn’t taught in school.

Tyrone Terry of Richmond said knowing the truth matters as the history of marginalized people is not openly talked about.

Fauquier COVID-19 cases up 34 since Friday morning

Posted Monday,
November 8, 2021
0 ·
The number of COVID-19 patients in Virginia hospital beds has dropped by 117 since Friday morning.
Vaccinations
63.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 45,270. Statewide, the rate stands at 70.5%.


57.8%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,165. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.3%.


88,725
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Sunday morning, up 676 from Friday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 34 new COVID-19 cases since Friday morning, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday.

The county’s cases total 7,125 since the pandemic started, with 294 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 6 new cases Monday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 21, with 14 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 448 active cases — 322 among students and 126 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 4. A week earlier, the school system had 75 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Monday morning reported 3,386 new cases since Friday morning and 65 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,190 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 936,920.

Virginia hospitals reported 806 infected patients in their beds Monday morning, down 117 from Friday morning.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,042 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,623 cases, up 32 from Friday morning.

Orange County, 3,787, cases up 27, and its 60th death.

Madison County, 1,020 cases, up 10.

Rappahannock County, 598 cases, up 8.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 5.6 percent statewide and 9 percent in the health district.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
November 8, 2021
0 ·

Barbara C. Fritter

Posted Sunday,
November 7, 2021
0 ·

Alberta C. King

Posted Sunday,
November 7, 2021
0 ·

Sally L. Barber

Posted Saturday,
November 6, 2021
0 ·

5 Friday Fauquier factoids: Principal up on the roof

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·
Contributed Photo
Pajama-clad Principal Temple Macdonald greets students and parents the morning after his night in a tent atop the roof at St. John the Enangelist Elementary School.
$26,000

The amount St. John the Evangelist Elementary students raised with their annual Color Run, sending Principal Temple Macdonald to spend a chilly night on the Warrenton school’s roof.

Mr. Macdonald slept in a tent the night of Oct. 27-28 to make good on his promise to do so if the students raised a record $25,000.

“I am happy to make a small sacrifice by sleeping on the roof in order to thank you for this record-breaking accomplishment,” the principal told students and parents. “Your continued support is what gives our school the resources and support we need, opening the doors for future learners.

“It is amazing that we were able to beat our previous record by over $5,000.”

The money will help update the students’ technology lab. Surpassing the goal will provide students with additional technology upgrades.

In 2012, then-Principal Art Fairweather camped atop the school after students raised more $20,000 which the annual run, exceeding their goal by $5,000.

To show his support, Mr. Fairweather showed up during the student drop-off, surprising Mr. Macdonald.


36

Years have passed since a Democratic candidate for governor last carried Fauquier County on Election Day.

In his 1985 victory, Gerald Baliles (D) edged Wyatt B. Durrette Jr. (R), 4,175 to 4,168, in Fauquier.

On Tuesday, Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin (R) earned a 10,706-vote advantage over Terry McAuliffe (D) here. Mr. Youngkin got 65.56 percent of the Fauquier vote, according to unofficial results.

In the last 10 gubernatorial elections, Republicans have averaged 65 percent of the vote here.

Bob McDonnell in 2009 did the best during that period, getting 68.8 percent of Fauquier votes on his way to victory over Creigh Deeds.


149

The number of elevators in Fauquier County buildings.

The total includes 84 elevators in residential structures and 65 in commercial/public buildings, according to Commissioner of Revenue Eric Maybach.



4,913

Fauquier residents have received COVID-19 booster shots.

Those people already had two Moderna or Pfizer shots or one Johnson & Johnson does.

Statewide, 669,567 residents had received booster shots as of Friday morning, according to the Virginia Department of Health.



197

The number of single-family home building permits Fauquier County issued in 2020.

The county at that time had 27,398 dwelling units.

Best Bets: Mandolin concert and seasonal festivals

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·
Clockwise from top left: The synthetic ice rink at the Northern Fauquier Community Park, blacksmiths at Sky Meadows State Park and mandolin virtuosos Jack Dunlap and Danny Knicely.
As the weather turns seasonably cooler and the colors of autumn reach their peak, local activities turn to thoughts of the holiday season.

This weekend in Fauquier offers a variety of outdoor activities, including festivals, the county’s synthetic ice rink opening and a busy Saturday at Sky Meadows State Park.

Other options include a concert by mandolin virtuosos at Gloria’s in Warrenton and a drive-thru Italian dinner at the Orlean fire/rescue station.


Synthetic Ice Rink Opens for Season
Dawn to dusk, Saturday, Nov. 6
Northern Fauquier Community Park
4155 Monroe Parkway, Marshall


The rink opens to anyone with his/her own skates through Dec. 17. During this period, the rink operates on a “skate at your own risk” basis. Then, the rink offers fee-based skating and lessons Dec. 18 through Jan. 4.


Pop Up Christmas Shop
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6
Warrenton Moose Lodge
6415 Colonial Road, Warrenton


Women of the Moose Chapter 1813 sponsors the event, which will include a variety of crafters and other vendors. Free admission.


P.B. Smith Roadrunners
Classic Car Show & Fall Festival

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6
P.B. Smith Elementary School
6176 Dumfries Road, Warrenton


Friends of Smith hosts the event, which will include cars, trucks, motorcycles, a bounce house, a haunted house, lawn games, trunk or treat, food trucks, a fall bake sale, a cider bar, music and dancing. Tickets: $5 per person and $20 per show vehicle registration.


The Farmer’s Forge
Noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6
Sky Meadows State Park
11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane


Blacksmith Guild of the Potomac members will show off their skills, making tools and kitchen items used on the farm. The state park offers a variety of activities Saturday, including a Civil War camp re-enactment, a 19th-century cooking demonstration and the Astronomy for Everyone program after dark. Parking fee: $10 per vehicle.


Volunteer Day: Native Seed Collection
12:30 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6
The Clifton Institute
6712 Blantyre Road, Warrenton


Volunteers will help the 900-acre preserve’s staff collect and clean seeds of native grasses and wildflowers for Clifton’s grassland restoration programs. For adults and children 12 and older, accompanied by adults. Free. Clifton’s Nature Club (fee) for students also will meet Saturday afternoon.


Italian Drive-Thru Dinner
4 to 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6
Orlean Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department
6838 Leeds Manor Road, Orlean


Each dinner will include lasagna, salad, garlic bread and dessert. $15 donation per dinner will help the department pay for a new fire engine.


Danny Knicely and Jack Dunlap
8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


The mandolin players joined forces in 2016 as part of an apprenticeship program funded by the Virginia Folklife Program and the National Endowment for the Arts. Their nine months of working together produced their Wammie Award-winning album Chop, Shred & Split - A Mandolin Player's Apprenticeship. Their concerts feature a range of music, from bluegrass to old time, gypsy jazz, swing, polka and funk. Tickets: $20, free for children 12 and younger with parents or guardians. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Concessions bar available.


Other options


Warrenton Farmers Market
8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 6
21 Main St., Warrenton

Click here for more information.


Farmers Market
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 7
Archwood Green Barns
4557 Old Tavern Road, The Plains

Click here for more information.


Click here for calendar of events.

Fauquier COVID-19 cases total 7,091, up 26 Friday

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·
Friday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
63.5%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Friday morning — a total of 45,191. Statewide, the rate stands at 70.4%.


57.7%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,079. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.1%.


88,049
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Friday morning, up 328 from Thursday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 26 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,091 since the pandemic started, with 294 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 1 new case Friday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 15, with 9 among students and 6 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 442 active cases — 317 among students and 125 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 63 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Nov. 4. A week earlier, the school system had 75 students and no staff members in quarantine.

The health department Friday morning reported 1,369 new cases and 36 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,125 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 933,524.

Virginia hospitals reported 923 infected patients in their beds Friday morning, down 44 from Thursday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 73,010 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,591 cases, up 34 from Thursday.

Orange County, 3,760, cases up 9.

Madison County, 1,010 cases, up 6.

Rappahannock County, 590 cases, up 1.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 5.6 percent statewide and 7.9 percent in the health district.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·

On Critical Race Theory and true understanding

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·

‘Gimmicky’ strategy draws criticism from Democrats

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Graham Moomaw
A Democratic Party of Virginia mailer, which Terry McAuliffe’s campaign approved, touted former President Donald Trump’s support for Republican Glenn Youngkin.
There has been a guiding theory that pouring resources into the top of the ticket will lead to both top-of-the-ticket victory and down-ballot victories as well. We in fact saw the opposite here where Terry McAuliffe was not able to carry a state in which Biden won by a resounding margin a year ago.
— Lauren Baer, Democratic political consultant
By Graham Moomaw
The Virginia Mercury

Virginia Democrats were so confident their anti-Trump strategy was going to work they spent their own money to promote Republican Glenn Youngkin’s biggest endorsement.

To some who didn’t read closely, the fliers featuring all the nice things Mr. Trump said about Mr. Youngkin looked like pro-Youngkin messaging. But the fine print revealed it was an effort by the Democratic Party of Virginia and former governor Terry McAuliffe’s campaign to tie his opponent to Mr. Trump.

“Virginia is very very winnable, but everybody has to go out and vote,” the mailer quoted the former president as saying.

If the mailer was meant as clever subterfuge or a subtle joke, it wasn’t Democrats who were laughing Tuesday night, when election results showed huge Republican turnout in Trump-friendly rural areas and suburban battlegrounds swung hard toward Republicans.

“Most people didn’t believe it would happen,” Mr. Trump told Virginia-based conservative radio host John Fredericks in an interview Wednesday morning. “But Virginia is a different state than people think.”

“If there was no Trump in this election,” Mr. Fredericks chimed in, “there’s no Glenn Youngkin as governor-elect.”

As that harsh reality set in for Democrats Tuesday night, the Trump-Youngkin mailer was circulated online as an emblem of what many feel was a self-defeating strategy: Focusing too much on a polarizing ex-president and not enough on a positive message about what continued Democratic governance would mean for Virginians.

“I think we spend entirely too much time talking about Donald Trump and not articulating not only our vision for the future but spending time genuinely connecting with people and with their needs,” said Del. Sam Rasoul (D-Roanoke), who unsuccessfully sought the party’s nomination for lieutenant governor this year but won re-election to the House of Delegates on Tuesday. “We need to rethink the way we campaign in Virginia.”

Del. Rasoul resigned from a Democratic leadership post following the party’s loss to Mr. Trump in the 2016 presidential race, protesting what he saw as reliance on “hate and fear” to fight hate and fear. Five years later, the party is again wrestling with the limits of Trump-centric messaging.

“When we won last year, there was a great desire for normalcy among Democrats,” said Caitlin Bennett, chairwoman of the Fredericksburg Democratic Committee. “By tying Youngkin to Trump, it’s a reminder that we’re not back to normal. And that is true. But there’s a way to go about talking about what Youngkin’s saying specifically without necessarily being gimmicky about Trump.”

A different type of candidate at the top of the ticket might have been better able to articulate a positive vision, Ms. Bennett said, and the extent of the misfire shows in the fact that the two other Democrats running for statewide offices, lieutenant governor nominee Hala Ayala and Attorney General Mark Herring, who, despite losing their races, ran slightly ahead of Mr. McAuliffe in the election results.

“It’s unusual. And I think it should be noted. He was a weak candidate,” Ms. Bennett said. “I do think it was a mistake for the party establishment overall to embrace him before anyone had even announced they were running. There was a kind of feeling that this was a done deal.”

The McAuliffe campaign and the state party declined to comment for this story.

Several Democrats have argued the Trump emphasis came at the expense of reiterating what Democratic majorities have accomplished since he left office in early 2018. Those policy achievements included Medicaid expansion, legalizing marijuana, making it easier to vote and passing new voter protections, stronger gun control, a sweeping new anti-discrimination law, beginning to tackle climate change, abolishing the death penalty and making other reforms to criminal justice and policing and raising the minimum wage for the first time since 2009.

“Virginia Democrats had an exceedingly strong record of policy achievements to run on. And yet still resoundingly lost,” said Lauren Baer, managing partner at Arena, a Democratic group that helped staff several contested House races in Virginia this cycle. “Which to me signals that something is being lost in communication to voters.”

Mr. McAuliffe was campaigning to build on that list by raising the minimum wage to $15 faster than planned, ban assault weapons, boost education funding and teacher pay and require employers to provide paid sick leave and family medical leave.

But many feel those issues were lost in the shuffle of a campaign that featured too many reminders of Mr. Trump and allowed Mr. Youngkin to dictate the terms of the debate over education.

The McAuliffe campaign spent at least $55 million, an eye-popping sum for a gubernatorial race. Some of that money, Ms. Baer said, would’ve been better spent defending Democrats’ House majority, which many Democrats felt was achievable even with a McAuliffe loss. Republicans appear to have flipped seven Democratic-held House seats, enough to win back the control they lost in 2019. Many of those contests were decided by just a few hundred votes.

“There has been a guiding theory that pouring resources into the top of the ticket will lead to both top-of-the-ticket victory and down-ballot victories as well,” Ms. Baer said. “We in fact saw the opposite here where Terry McAuliffe was not able to carry a state in which Biden won by a resounding margin a year ago.”

Ms. Baer’s group spent a little over $165,000 in Virginia for the cycle.

Democrats’ struggles Tuesday weren’t unique to Virginia, suggesting Mr. McAuliffe’s loss can partly be explained by broader national headwinds rather than Virginia-specific strategy decisions. Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy came close to losing in New Jersey, where a powerful Democratic senator was defeated by a Republican truck driver who ran his campaign on a shoestring budget.

Democratic-aligned organizations’ Trump-heavy messaging began immediately after Mr. Youngkin secured the GOP nomination for governor in May, winning a party-run convention with several Trumpier candidates, including firebrand Sen. Amanda Chase, in the running.

Mr. McAuliffe and his allies labeled him “Glenn Trumpkin,” a taunt repeated throughout the campaign. The Trump emphasis backfired in embarrassing fashion late in the campaign when The Lincoln Project, an organization run by disaffected Republicans who oppose Mr. Trump and have worked to elect Democrats, staged a stunt in Charlottesville meant to tie Mr. Youngkin to the tiki torch-wielding white supremacists who terrorized the city four years ago. The group posed fake White supremacists in front of Mr. Youngkin’s bus, a plan widely condemned as dishonest and distasteful in light of an ongoing civil trial in Charlottesville meant to bring justice for victims of real White supremacists. But according to new reporting by The Intercept, the plan backfired when Democrats on Twitter, including several McAuliffe campaign staffers, mistook the actors as real Youngkin supporters.

In interviews, several Republican voters said they saw the constant Trump-themed attacks as a stretch since Mr. Youngkin never campaigned with the former president and had a far less incendiary political style. Kelly Heskett, a 41-year-old dental hygienist who attended a Mr. Youngkin rally in Henrico County last month, said the same guilt-by-association tactics could be used against Mr. McAuliffe for campaigning with Mr. Herring and Gov. Ralph Northam.

“That would be like me saying so you’re for blackface because you support Northam and Herring,” Ms. Heskett said. “Like it’s just so ridiculous that they’re trying to link him to that. To me, it shows that they’re just desperate.”

The Democratic Governors Association sought to put a positive spin on the outcome in a statement released Wednesday morning, saying Mr. McAuliffe ran “a strong, positive campaign focused on the issues that matter most.”

“The central goal of his campaign — to build a better Virginia that works for everyone — resonated with voters, and despite the outcome of the race, we saw that reflected in last night’s close results,” said DGA Executive Director Noam Lee.

In Virginia, some Democrats feel the down-ballot losses could’ve been worse and were only avoided by House candidates running stronger than the top of the ticket.

Del. Danica Roem (D-Prince William), one of Virginia Democrats’ rising stars who won re-election to a third term Tuesday, said the party needs to campaign on “day-to-day quality of life issues.” When she knocked on doors in her district, she said, she talked about her efforts to block above-ground transmission lines in her community, secure funding for commuter buses and provide free school lunches.

According to her review of election data in her district, Del. Roem said, there were a significant number of Youngkin-Roem voters. So what does it mean, she asked, that people who wanted a Republican governor also voted to keep “the trans metalhead from Manassas” as their delegate?

“It means that I show up,” she said. “I’m accessible. And I care.”

Vaccinating children helps end COVID-19 pandemic

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·

Seven numbers to know about this year’s election

Posted Friday,
November 5, 2021
0 ·

Republican agenda taking shape in Richmond

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Ned Oliver
Gov. Ralph Northam hosts Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin on Thursday at the Executive Mansion.
We’re going to stay focused on the things we believe the majority of Virginians want us to focus on.”
— Del. Todd Gilbert (R-Shenandoah County)
By Ned Oliver
The Virginia Mercury

A friendly meeting between the governor and the governor-elect. A preview of the new House majority’s agenda. Promises to refocus the attorney general’s office on law enforcement.

The transition of power from Democrats to Republicans in Richmond began in earnest Thursday after the GOP’s electoral sweep earlier this week, which handed the party control of all three statewide offices and the House of Delegates after two years of unified Democratic control.

At the Executive Mansion, Gov.-elect Glenn Youngkin and Gov. Ralph Northam dined on beef tenderloin together before emerging to address the press, promising a smooth transition between administrations.

“I just want to thank you for the incredibly cooperative way that you’ve expressed you’re going to help us,” Mr. Youngkin said, calling the meeting the beginning of a friendship. “It’s important. We have a lot of work to do.”

Mr. Youngkin also promised to be “incredibly open and accessible,” though neither he nor Gov. Northam took questions at the event.

Republicans say that behind the scenes, GOP leaders in the House are beginning to work with Mr. Youngkin to develop an agenda that might have a chance in the Senate, where Democrats still hold a one-seat majority.


Education

During a morning news conference, top House Republican Todd Gilbert (R-Shenandoah County) promised a laser focus on education — an issue that became a focus for the GOP in the final days of the race amid a nationwide debate over equity initiatives and how race is discussed and taught in schools.

“We have seen the education issue resonate so thoroughly and completely with Virginians this year because of what their children have been through,” Del. Gilbert said. “And it started with the pandemic and it progressed through our realization that there was really a movement afoot … to put excellence to the side in favor of so-called equity.”

Del. Gilbert also promised to revisit legislation passed by Democrats that ended requirements that certain crimes on school property be reported to police — a change aimed at reducing the number of students who graduate with criminal records but which drew a backlash after a sexual assault in a Loudoun County bathroom (though by all accounts, school officials did report that case to police and criminal charges were lodged against the teenager).


Climate change

Del. Gilbert said another top focus for the House would be rolling back climate change legislation passed by Democrats, which mandates the closure of all coal-fired power plants by 2024 and requires the state’s electric utilities go entirely carbon free by 2050.

He called the legislation, which state regulators at one point estimated would eventually add $800 a year to the average family’s electric bill, too expensive.

“It’s a so-called green measure that really made life a lot more expensive for everybody by taking away access to fossil fuels and incentivizing things that aren’t proven to be a complete picture of our energy sector,” he said. “Things like solar and wind that may complement that but shouldn’t form the core of generating the energy we need to run a large economy like Virginia’s economy.”


Voting

Del. Gilbert was silent on most of the new voting laws Democrats passed, which opened a month-long early voting window, created no excuse absentee balloting and mandated drop boxes for them in every county.

But he said the party is intent on reinstating a requirement that all voters show identification at the polls.

“That’s something that I think universally people think is a good idea — that you should be able to prove who you are before you do something as important as voting. But other than that, those matters … have not been on our lips,” he said.


Abortion

Del. Gilbert pushed back in response to questions about whether the party would pursue legislation limiting abortion. When Democrats were in power, they struck GOP laws that created a mandatory 24-hour waiting period and required a woman undergo an ultrasound.

“You didn’t hear our caucus running on those things,” he said. “We’re going to stay focused on the things we believe the majority of Virginians want us to focus on.”


Law enforcement

Finally, Attorney General-elect Jason Miyares, who currently serves as a GOP delegate, said he intends to make law enforcement a focus of his four years in office — a major shift for a department that is primarily tasked with advising and representing state agencies and boards and defending state officials and laws in civil court.

Flanked by sheriffs from Loudoun, Prince William and Chesterfield counties during a press conference to announce his transition team, he said one of his top priorities will be passing legislation that would allow his office to intervene in local cases if police disagree with how prosecutors are handling them — a proposal he said is inspired by dissatisfaction with plea deals he considers too lenient.

“It would essentially say that if a chief law enforcement officer in a jurisdiction, either chief of police or the sheriff, makes a request because a commonwealth attorney is not doing their job, I’m going to do their job for them,” Del. Miyares said. “And I’m thinking specifically of some of the so-called social justice commonwealth’s attorneys elected in Northern Virginia.”

Betty Pinkard Kenny

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·

County has 10 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·
The health department reports 1,435 new COVID-19 cases and 32 more deaths statewide Thursday morning.
Vaccinations
63.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Thursday morning — a total of 45,145. Statewide, the rate stands at 70.3%.


57.6%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 41,040. Statewide, the rate stands at 63.1%.


87,721
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning, up 209 from Wednesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 5 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 10 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,065 since the pandemic started, with 295 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have 7 new cases Thursday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 26, with 18 among students and 8 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 441 active cases — 317 among students and 124 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 75 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 30. A week earlier, the school system had 108 students and 2 staff members in quarantine.

The health department Thursday morning reported 1,494 new cases and 37 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,089 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 932,173.

Virginia hospitals reported 967 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning, unchanged from Wednesday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 72,970 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,557 cases, up 19 from Wednesday.

Orange County, 3,751, cases up 7.

Madison County, 1,004 cases, up 1.

Rappahannock County, 589 cases, up 3.

As of Thursday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 5.4 percent statewide and 7.8 percent in the health district.

COVID-19 vaccine available here to children 5 to 11

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·

Ira Austin Corbin

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·

Edward “Skeeter” Hembry

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·

Richard R. Thompson Jr.

Posted Thursday,
November 4, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
November 3, 2021
0 ·

Nine reasons Republicans swept Virginia elections

Posted Wednesday,
November 3, 2021
0 ·

What should happen to Warrenton’s former Town Hall on Court Street?

Posted Wednesday,
November 3, 2021
0 ·

Delays in vaccinating state’s 5- to 11-year-olds expected

Posted Wednesday,
November 3, 2021
0 ·
Photo/Wikipedia
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday gave final approval to Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines for 5- to 11-year-olds.
The availability is a little constrained because this is a new vial, it’s new packaging, it’s a new buffer. So, we can’t just draw up from existing adult vials, unfortunately, because we have plenty of those ready to go.
— Breanne Forbes Hubbard, Mount Rogers Health District population health manager
By Kate Masters
The Virginia Mercury

After months of anticipation from families, Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines for 5- to 11-year-olds were authorized Tuesday after a sign-off from Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But doctors and local health officials are urging patience even as thousands of vaccines, specially formulated for pediatric patients, flow into Virginia. State vaccine coordinator Dr. Danny Avula said supply isn’t a concern for health officials. But the first shipment of doses will be divided across the state and, in many cases, redistributed to local providers, likely creating some backlogs when it comes to booking appointments.

“The availability is a little constrained because this is a new vial, it’s new packaging, it’s a new buffer,” said Breanne Forbes Hubbard, population health manager for the Mount Rogers Health District in southwestern Virginia. “So, we can’t just draw up from existing adult vials, unfortunately, because we have plenty of those ready to go.”

According to Dr. Avula, a total of 377,000 pediatric doses are expected to be delivered to Virginia in the first week of shipments — 252,000 of which will go to health departments, private practices and health systems. Another 125,000 will be delivered to pharmacies through a partnership with the federal government.

That supply is enough to vaccinate more than half of the 723,000 children across Virginia who became eligible after Tuesday’s decision. And national polling by the Kaiser Family Foundation indicates only 27 percent of parents plan to get their 5- to 11-year-olds vaccinated “right away,” making it even less likely that the state won’t have enough shots to meet demand, Dr. Avula said (the same poll suggests that three in 10 parents “definitely” don’t plan to get their children vaccinated at all).

“The supply is not going to be a concern,” he added. But state health officials will again be tasked with matching shots to geographic demand. That was a challenge much earlier in the initial vaccine rollout, before doses became widely available to all adults in Virginia. At some points, clinics in rural areas with lower uptake were swamped with out-of-town visitors who weren’t yet eligible for appointments in their own home health districts.

In an effort to meet demand, Dr. Avula said the state is tracking its initial distribution of pediatric vaccines to uptake among 12- to 15-year-olds, Roughly 57.5 percent of children in that age group have been fully vaccinated, according to data from the Virginia Department of Health, but numbers are highest in regions including Northern Virginia and Albemarle County (which have seen some of the highest uptake among all ages).

Those areas will also receive the largest distribution of doses for 5- to 11-year-olds, a decision that at least some preliminary surveys seem to support. In Fairfax County, for example, 76 percent of parents with children in that age group planned to get them vaccinated, based on a survey conducted by the local school system (though only 36 percent of families responded to the poll).

In parts of Southwest Virginia, just under 60 percent of families planned to have their children receive the shots, according to Dr. Noelle Bissell, who currently directs the New River, Cumberland Plateau, Lenowisco and Mount Rogers health districts. Still, both she and Forbes Hubbard said a rush of demand from some families could create bottlenecks.

Some shipments still have to be broken down into smaller allotments and distributed to local doctor’s offices. And while parents won’t have to pre-register their children with the state — a process that defined the earliest days of the vaccine rollout — many health districts are requiring appointments for 5- to 11-year-olds at local clinics to make sure they have the supply.

“There will be enough vaccine, but in these first weeks, everyone might not be able to get that appointment when they want it,” Dr. Bissell said. “We do ask that people have some patience. You’ll be able to get your child vaccinated, but it might not be right away.”

Even in districts receiving larger shipments, there could be delays in booking appointments over the next few weeks. Dr. Michael Martin, president of the Virginia chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said that’s largely due to where most parents will seek out appointments.

Pediatric vaccines will largely be available through the same providers offering shots to adults and adolescents, including pharmacies and local health departments. In most areas, health districts are also coordinating with public schools to offer clinics.

But some polling, including Fairfax County’s survey, indicated that most parents preferred to have younger children vaccinated by their pediatricians. And Dr. Martin, who’s based in Northern Virginia, said many practices are still struggling with staffing and a huge demand for services as COVID-19 continues to circulate through schools.

“I think over the next few weeks everyone who wants it will get it,” he said. “But we’re talking in the range of weeks, not days. We’re still backlogged, so there is going to be a bottleneck, even if a practice could get all the supply they wanted.”

Even with some expected delays, doctors and health officials are urging families not to wait on scheduling appointments. At the start of the pandemic, cases among children aged 0 to 17 accounted for less than two percent of COVID-19 infections in Virginia. Over the last three months, children have made up more than 20 percent of new infections, with some of the highest numbers among 5- to 11-year-olds who weren’t previously eligible for the vaccine.

Ten children have died from the disease, according to reporting from VDH, including six under the age of 10. And while there’s currently no evidence the delta variant is more dangerous to children than earlier versions of the virus, Dr. Forbes Hubbard pointed out that pediatric hospitalizations spiked during the latest surge.

“There are substantial health concerns, which is why the vaccine was authorized for this age group,” she said. Experts currently don’t know if contracting COVID-19 can have long-term effects on children, and at least 103 patients in Virginia have developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, which can lead to serious inflammation in various parts of the body.

There are also practical reasons for children to get vaccinated, she said. Under current public health guidelines, vaccinated individuals aren’t required to quarantine after potential exposures. And with spread still occurring in schools, immunizing children can help them avoid missing classes, sports and other events.

“It helps us get back to a more normal school life, a normal activity life,” Dr. Forbes Hubbard said. “Parents don’t have to miss as much work. And of course it helps us cut down on disease transmission overall, which helps prevent COVID from getting back into the community.”

Youngkin gets more than 65% of Fauquier votes

Posted Tuesday,
November 2, 2021
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Glenn A. Youngkin speaks at an Oct. 14 rally in Warrenton’s Eva Walker Park.
Winsome Sears, 57, of Winchester, wins the lieutenant governor’s race.
Jason S. Miyares, 45, of Virginia Beach, unseats Attorney General Mark Herring.
Republican candidate for governor Glenn A. Youngkin and his running mates won overwhelming portions of the Fauquier vote on the way to statewide victories in Tuesday’s election.

Mr. Youngkin won 65 percent of the votes in Fauquier — the best performance of a Republican gubernatorial candidate here since Bob McDonnell, who took 68.8 percent of the county vote in 2009.

In his first campaign for elective office, Mr. Youngkin defeated Terry McAuliffe, a Democrat who served as governor from 2014 to ’18.

Mr. Youngkin, 54, retired last year as co-CEO of the Carlyle Group, a private equity firm headquartered in Washington, D.C.

The Great Falls resident led the GOP ticket that won statewide offices for the first time since Mr. McDonnell’s victory in 2009.

Mr. Youngkin got 50.68 percent of the statewide vote and a winning margin of 70,014 votes.

His 10,706-vote advantage in Fauquier equals 15 percent of the governor-elect’s statewide margin.

Republican Winsome E. Sears, 57, of Winchester, defeated Democrat Hala S. Ayala in the lieutenant governor’s race.

Republican Jason S. Miyares, 45, of Virginia Beach, unseated Attorney General Mark Herring, a Democrat who sought a third term.

Republicans also won a 51-49 majority in the Virginia House of Delegates on Tuesday.

Heading into the election, Democrats had a 55-45 edge in the House.

In the local House of Delegates races:

• Del. Michael Webert (R-18th/Marshall) won 66 percent of the district vote, easily turning back a challenge from Rappahannock County Democrat Doug Ward to win a sixth, two-year term.

• Del. Elizabeth Guzman (D-31st/Woodbridge), with 54 percent of the district vote, defeated Republican challenger Benjamin W. “Ben” Baldwin to win a third term.

• Phillip A. “Phil” Scott (R), a government contractor from Fredericksburg, got 57.4 percent of the district vote to win a three-way race to succeed Del. Mark Cole (R-88th/Spotsylvania), who will retire at year’s end after 10 terms.

In Fauquier, 65.1 percent of voters cast ballots in the Nov. 2 election.

Early voting grew in popularity, with 12,872 Fauquier citizens casting ballots early. That represented 38 percent of the 33,854 total ballots cast.


Unofficial Fauquier Vote Totals

> Governor

65.56% — Glenn A. Youngkin (R), 22,205 votes

33.95% — Terry R. McAuliffe (D), 11,499

0.44% — Princes L. Blanding (L), 150


> Lt. Governor

65.41% — Winsome E. Sears (R), 22,088 votes

34.51% — Hala S. Ayala (D), 11,654


> Attorney General

65.04% — Jason S. Miyares (R), 21,962 votes

34.91% — Mark R. Herring (D), 11,787


> 18th House District

62.91% — Michael J. Webert (R), 12,976 votes

36.97% — Douglas J. Ward (D), 7,625


> 31st House District

70.39% — Benjamin W. “Ben” Baldwin (R), 6,321 votes

29.51% — Elizabeth R. Guzman (D), 2,650


> 88th House District

72.8% — Phillip A. “Phil” Scott (R), 3,022 votes

25.75% — Kecia S. Evans (D), 1,069

1.42% — Timothy M. Lewis (L), 59

Stops Along the Way: Meeting Claude – Volume II

Posted Tuesday,
November 2, 2021
0 ·

Gardening: Plan landscape renovation methodically

Posted Tuesday,
November 2, 2021
0 ·

County has 18 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Tuesday,
November 2, 2021
0 ·
Stock Photo
Fauquier County Public Schools reported no new COVID-19 cases Tuesday morning.
Vaccinations
63.3%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 45,077. Statewide, the rate stands at 70.1%.


57.5%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,975. Statewide, the rate stands at 63%.


87,263
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday morning, up 198 from Monday.



Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 18 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s cases total 7,039 since the pandemic started, with 294 hospitalized patients and 86 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools have no new cases Tuesday morning.

The number of “active cases” in schools stands at 19, with 14 among students and 5 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 434 active cases — 313 among students and 121 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 75 students and no staff members in quarantine as of Thursday morning, Oct. 30. A week earlier, the school system had 108 students and 2 staff members in quarantine.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 1,245 new cases and 36 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 14,020 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 929,244.

Virginia hospitals reported 954 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, up 20 from Monday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 72,753 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,527 cases, up 4 from Monday.

Orange County, 3,735, cases up 3.

Madison County, 1,000 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 582 cases, up 2.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 5.5 percent statewide and 7.8 percent in the health district.


Linda F. Cantrell

Posted Tuesday,
November 2, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
November 1, 2021
0 ·

Formerly part of Airlie, 253 acres sell for $4.5 million

Posted Monday,
November 1, 2021
0 ·
The property that sold for $4.5 million on Airlie Road includes International House, which has served as a home and as an office building.
This 50-acre property near Marshall sold for $3.6 million.
Formerly part of the Airlie Conference Center, 253 acres near Warrenton recently sold for $4.5 million.

The five tracts of land include a 25-acre lake, a paved airstrip, a stone bridge, an 8,000-square-foot house/office building, other structures and extensive fencing.

The Center District property lies across Airlie Road (Route 605) from the remaining 300-acre conference center, which American University received as a donation in 2016.

Heirs of the late Murdock Head, Airlie’s founder, put the 353 acres on the real estate market in August 2019, with an asking price of $5.85 million.

Dr. Head in 1976 renovated the house on that property for his home and office. During that period, Airlie had a partnership with George Washington University, which offered programs there. Airlie also produced documentaries with its Raven’s Hollow film unit, headquartered on that part of the park-like campus.

The property includes the familiar stone waterfall on the north side of the road, across from the Airlie House entrance.

Chris Malone of Chris Malone Real Estate represented the seller and Beverly Beck of eXp Realty represented the buyer.

The sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier real estate transactions.

Also recently, a home on 50 acres near Marshall sold for $3.6 million.

Built in 1986, the 9,600-square-foot home on Clarendon Farm Lane has four bedrooms, 5-1/2 bathrooms, a large family room with a cathedral ceiling and stone fireplace, a chef’s kitchen and an elevator.

The property also features a swimming pool, pool house and a guest house with two bedrooms and to bathrooms.

The property went on the market in August with an asking price of $3.75 million, according to Realtor.com.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Oct. 21-27, 2021:


Cedar Run District

Elizabeth I.P Jones, John R. Pohzehl and others to John P. and Amy M. Connelly, 40 acres, 5348 Casanova Road, near Casanova, $675,000.

Jesse A. Ramirez to Shawn A.C. Boyce, 2.9 acres, 4576 Midland, near Midland, $130,000.

Jonathan R. Davis to William Villatoro and Beatriz Valadez, 1.9 acres, 11285 Rogues Road, near Midland, $300,000.

Seth B. Snouffer to Ashton R. and Sarah C. Snouffer, 1 acre, Lot 6-A, Woodside Village Subdivision, 7482 Ali Lane, near Nokesville, $300,000.

Joseph A. and Misty D. Phillips to James and Jeanne Simick, 11 acres and 1 acre, 8596 Rogues Road, near Warrenton, $832,000.

NVR Inc. to Jason R. and Lori M. Johnson, Lot 62, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 6409 Redwinged Blackbird Drive, near Warrenton, $900,942.


Center District

Miles H. Colson to Avery S. and William C. Hughes Sr., Townhouse 13-B, Phase 1, Leeds Square, 90-B Leeds Court, Warrenton, $284,900.

Kimarren Corp. to Lion King Properties LLC, 253.4 acres, 5 tracts, 6886 Airlie Road, near Warrenton, $4,500,000.

Jessica M. and Dewayne C. Vaughan to Michael Nichols, Lot 36, White’s Mill Subdivision, 7622 Morven Lane, near Warrenton, $635,000.

David W. and Kelly J. Peck to Mark A. and Marie D. Russo, Lot 57, Section 2E, Olde Gold Cup Subdivision, 153 Secretariat Court, Warrenton, $590,000.

Malinda Wayland, trustee, to Richard A. and Patricia A. Marquise, Lot 39, Phase 2, Carriage House Chase Subdivision, 239 Carriage Chase Circle, Warrenton, $541,000.

Melanie S. Galanis to Bradley R. and Anna M. Dengler, Lot 43, Monroe Estates Subdivision, 616 Galina Way, Warrenton, $650,000.


Lee District

Judith A. Charboneau to Gary R. Hix, Lot 120-R, Phase 4, Wankoma Village Subdivision, 7657 Wankoma Drive, Remington, $275,000.

Kimberly Dragich to Ian D. and Elizabeth M. Barclay, Lot 8, Phase A, Section 2, Mintbrook Subdivision, 3004 Revere St., Bealeton, $500,000.

Roberto J. and Patricia G. Paglinawan to Mark D. and Amanda B. Taylor and Robert L. Bridges Jr., 1 acre, 10712 Weaversville Road, near Bealeton, $385,000.

Gary R. and Glenda L. Repass to Christopher Flanagan and Leah Henry, 1.1 acre, Lot 2, Sumerduck Forest Subdivision, 5473 Huckleberry Lane, Sumerduck, $366,000.

Ethan W. and Jordan Bertschinger to James P. McCombe, Lot 132, Phase 3, Southcoate Village Subdivision, 10996 Southcoate Village Drive, near Bealeton, $475,000.


Marshall District

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Gregory O. and Kristina J. Fassett, Lot 20, Phase 1-B, Carter’s Crossing Subdivision, 8653 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $385,465.

Susanna N. Ramey to Mark W. Lindsey and Constance M. Chintall, 10.7 acres, Lot 5-R, Fox Division, 8711 Sylvan Lane, near Marshall, $750,000.

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Miranda L. Maurer, Lot 25, Phase 1-B, Carter’s Crossing Subdivision, 8663 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $380,470

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Joseph P. Laws, Lot 28, Phase 1-B, Carter’s Crossing Subdivision, 7047 Osborn Court, Marshall, $462,730.

Dean R. and Christine E. Morgan to Griffin Anderson and Vivian G. Hagerty, 25 acres, Lot 21-R, Athlone Hills Subdivision, 10427 Twisted Oak Lane, near Marshall, $568,000.

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Brigitte S. Thomas and Jonathan E Loveless, Lot 19, Phase 1-B, Carter’s Crossing Subdivision, 8561 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $417,830.

Calibert Homebuilder Inc. to Andrew F. and Jennifer M. Clay, 15.1 acres, 3861 Rolling Grove Lane, near Marshall, $719,434.

Old Salem Community Development LLC to Lauren B. and Robert W.J. Rosse, Lot 24, Phase 1-B, Carter’s Crossing Subdivision, 8661 Anderson Ave., Marshall, $386,550.

Clark R. and Susan J. Lunsford to Christopher P. and Cindy R. Williams, 11.6 acres, Lot 5, Kings Haven Subdivision, 10429 Wheatley School Road, near Orlean, $600,000.

William C. and Nancy E. Segnit to Israel R. N. Llambq, 1 acre, Lot 1, Carter Division, 95686 Elihu Hill Road, near Marshall, $375,000.

Halemah Wa Bess LLC, Jawaqd N. Sarsour as manager, to Evan. C. and Maria O’Rourke, Lot 7, Section 2, Mauzy Square Subdivision, 8322 Mauzy Square, Marshall, $245,000.

Daniel L. and Christy L. Duperron to Bonnie and Thomas Bellows, 8.3 acres, 10241 Waldeck Lane, Delaplane, $700,000.

Neil P. and Charles E. Garner II to David and Jaime Popik, 6.5 acres, Lot 1-R, Baker Division, 11035 Lockhart Lane, near Orlean, $200,000.

Enid M. McConnell and Howard T. Eggers to MSB Front Royal LLC, 2.2 acres, Lot 2, Rockledge Subdivision 9208 Mountjoy Road, near Marshall, $348,000.

I. Robert and Faye E. Brooks to Brian F. and Kathleen Gorgas, 25.6 acres, 4393 Fiery Run Road, near Linden, $365,000.

Carolyn W. and John C. Simpson Jr. to Charles H. and Piexin L. Dallara, 50 acres, 10011 Clarendon Farm Lane, near Marshall, $3,637,500.

Michael R. Wilson to Olga D. Crown, trustee, 9.9 acres, Lot 1-B, Buck Run Hunt Estates Subdivision, Keyser Road, Hume, $185,000.


Scott District

Louis Leong to David and Margaret Burns, 1 acre, Lot 14 Mill Run Acres, 7326 Moss Lane, near Warrenton, $595,000.

Michalis S. Aifotitis to James A. and Evelyn M.B. Morehouse, 5 acres, Lot 10, Springdale Subdivision, 5044 Edgebrook Drive, near Warrenton, $300,000.

Matthew D. and Jennifer L. Taylor to Michael D. and Michelle L. Johnson, 10.3 acres, Lot 10, Evergreen Mountain Subdivision, 6180 Evergreen Mountain Road, Broad Run, $600,000.
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