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Ellen’s Kitchen & Garden

Who will win the World Series?

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
0 ·

Stops Along the Way: Thou shalt love thy neighbor

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
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Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
0 ·

Del. Webert a “proponent of excellent policing”

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
0 ·

Health department offering COVID-19 booster shots

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier Health File Photo
The regional health department offers boosters in accordance with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
The booster vaccine can be obtained by eligible individuals at least six months from the date of second mRNA (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) COVID-19 vaccine or at least two months from the date of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.
The Virginia Department of Health’s Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District offers COVID-19 vaccine boosters for the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccine in accordance with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The booster vaccine can be obtained by eligible individuals at least six months from the date of second mRNA (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) COVID-19 vaccine or at least two months from the date of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.

Those eligible for the booster dose include these people who completed the Pfizer or Moderna primary series at least six months ago:

• 65 and older.

• Those 18 or older who live in long-term care settings, who have underlying medical conditions or who work or live in high-risk settings.

All individuals 18 or older who received the Johnson & Johnson primary vaccine dose at least two months ago also qualify.

Those eligible to receive a COVID-19 booster may choose which vaccine product they would like to receive. Some may have a preference to receive the same vaccine product as their primary series. Others may have a preference to receive a different product than their primary series. Individuals considering a different product can speak to their healthcare provider for additional guidance.

RRHD will offer first, second and booster doses at a central site in Culpeper County: Reva Fire Department, 18230 Birmingham Road. For available days and times, visit http://www.rrhd.org or call 540-308-6072.

Residents may also sign up for appointments at vaccinate.virginia.gov or call 877-VAX-IN-VA (877-829-4682, TTY users call 7-1-1). Assistance is available in English, Spanish, and more than 100 other languages.

RRHD officials encourage everyone eligible to get their COVID-19 vaccine if they have not already done so. To find a vaccination site near you, visit vase.vdh.virginia.gov or visit www.vaccines.gov.

Those visiting for a booster dose should bring their vaccine cards to confirm the date and type of vaccine previously received. A parent or guardian must accompany anyone younger than 18.

For more information on COVID-19 in Virginia, visit vdh.virginia.gov/coronavirus.

To find convenient, free vaccination locations near you, visit vaccinate.virginia.gov or call 877-VAX-IN-VA (877-829-4682, TTY users call 7-1-1).


Pace slowing, Fauquier has 17 new COVID-19 cases

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
0 ·
The state health department reports 1,299 new COVID-19 cases and 48 more deaths across Virginia.
Vaccinations
62.8%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 44,715. Statewide, the rate stands at 69.4%.


57.1%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,667. Statewide, the rate stands at 62.4%.


84,949
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Sunday morning, up 335 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All residents 65 and older — along with those 18 and older with underlying medical conditions or high risks — who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has clinics, with appointments available.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.
Fauquier has 17 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,939 since the pandemic started, with 289 hospitalizations and 85 deaths attributed to the virus.

So far in October, Fauquier has 405 new cases — an average of 16 per day, 25 more hospitalizations and 4 deaths.

Those numbers have declined since September, when the county averaged 27 new cases per day and recorded 35 new hospitalizations, along with 9 deaths.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Tuesday reported 4 more cases than on Monday.

County schools have 37 “active cases,” with 28 among students and 9 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 431 active cases — 310 among students and 121 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 108 students and 2 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 21. A week earlier, the school system had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 1,299 new cases and 48 more deaths statewide since Monday. Virginia deaths total 13,793 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 919,999.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,202 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, down 28 from Monday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 72,280 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,458 cases, up 13 from Monday, and 3 more hospitalizations for a total of 221.

Orange County, 3,671, cases up 11.

Madison County, 988 cases, up 2.

Rappahannock County, 575 cases, unchanged.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 6.2 percent statewide and 10.5 percent in the health district.

Student allegedly waved BB gun outside Kettle Run HS

Posted Tuesday,
October 26, 2021
0 ·
Morgan Bender allegedly waved “a handgun out the driver’s side window of a vehicle” Friday afternoon near the senior parking area at Kettle Run High School.
A Kettle Run High School student faces two criminal charges for allegedly brandishing a BB gun on the campus Friday afternoon.

A Fauquier sheriff’s deputy arrested and charged Morgan Joseph Bender, 18, of, Catlett, with brandishing and possession of a seapon on school property at 3:30 p.m. on Oct. 22, according to Sgt. Steve Lewis.

“Deputies investigated a suspicious incident that occurred at 7403 Academic Ave (Kettle Run High School),” Sgt. Lewis wrote in a press release. “It was reported that a male subject was seen waving a handgun out the driver’s side window of a vehicle on school property near the senior parking area.”

Deputies identified Mr. Bender as the suspect, Sgt. Lewis said.

“He was later located at Liberty High School and taken into custody without incident,” the sergeant said. “Deputies located the weapon, which was determined to be a CO2 BB Gun.”

A Kettle Run student, Mr. Bender also attends classes at Liberty High, according to county schools spokeswoman Tara Helkowski.

Mr. Bender posted a $10,000 unsecured bond and was released from the Fauquier County Adult Detention Center, Sgt. Lewis said.

Larry J. Rice

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
0 ·

The good reasons to vote Democratic on Nov. 2

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
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Hammer new director of Leadership Fauquier

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
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Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
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Judge imposes 43-year sentence in teen’s murder

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
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Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Deputies escort Daniel M. Farmer II from the Fauquier County Circuit Courthouse after his sentencing for murder Monday morning.
I just want to let the court know how I am, you know, very sorry for what happened. It was not me who killed Mr. Williams,” he added. “I accept responsibility for my role . . . . I was a victim myself. I tried to stop this from happening, but it went the wrong way.
— Daniel M. Farmer II, defendant
Farmer Murder Case
• Case: Aug. 26, 2019, murder of Lincoln Lamar Williams Jr., 18. Mr. Williams got shot in the face outside of his home at 5042 Old Auburn Mill Road, about five miles east of Warrenton. He died later that night in Fauquier Hospital.

• Defendant: Daniel Martin Farmer, 25, of Nokesville.

• Charges: First-degree murder, use of a firearm in the commission of a felony, robbery and conspiracy to commit robbery.

• Jury trial: July 12-14 in Fauquier County Circuit Court.

• Verdicts: Guilty on all four counts.

• Sentences: 25 years for murder, 10 for conspiracy, 5 for robbery and 3 for use of a firearm.

• Prosecutors: Senior Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorneys Abigail J. Owens and Amy Cassandra.

• Defense attorney: Robert V. Bryan Jr. of Fairfax.

• Judge: James P. Fisher

• Jury: Seven men and five women deliberated 2-1/2 hours in July 14 to reach verdicts.

• Sentencing: Judge Fisher on Monday, Oct. 25, imposed the jury’s sentences and ordered the defendant to remain on probation for 13 years after his release from prison.
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

A Nokesville man will spend most of his life in prison for his role in the August 2019 murder of a Warrenton teenager.

Daniel Martin Farmer II, 25, will serve a total sentence of 43 years in prison for planning a robbery that led to the fatal shooting of Lincoln L. Williams Jr., 18.

Myi’son I. Ellis of Waynesboro last year received a 51-year sentence for murdering Mr. Williams outside the teenager’s home on Old Auburn Road east of Warrenton on Aug. 26, 2019.

Because of a dispute over a drug purchase from the victim, Mr. Farmer recruited Mr. Ellis to rob the teenager. But, during an argument that night, Mr. Ellis shot Mr. Williams, who died about an hour later of a head wound at Fauquier Hospital.

“I just want to let the court know how I am, you know, very sorry for what happened,” Mr. Farmer told Judge James P. Fisher just before sentencing Monday morning in Fauquier County Circuit Court.

“It was not me who killed Mr. Williams,” he added. “I accept responsibility for my role . . . . I was a victim myself. I tried to stop this from happening, but it went the wrong way.”

During his trial in July, Mr. Farmer testified that he tried to call off the robbery that night as he drove Mr. Ellis to the Williams house.

Mr. Farmer claimed Mr. Ellis threatened him with a handgun during that ride but then got out of the car and into co-defendant Lucretia Robinson’s vehicle. Still, Mr. Farmer continued to lead them to the victim’s house, which neither Mr. Ellis nor Ms. Robinson had ever visited.

“I reject the notion that you’re a victim in this case,” Judge Fisher said. “Without you, none of this would have happened.”

The defendant’s mother, Stephanie Lewis, and sister, Karen Farmer, testified briefly on his behalf before sentencing.

“He’s a really good kid,” Ms. Lewis said. “He had some trouble growing up, but other than that, he’s a really good kid.”

With his father absent and her work schedule, “he had a lot of trouble growing up,” she added.

Convicted of robbery, brandishing a firearm and gang membership, Mr. Farmer at age 13 started serving a term in a juvenile detention center.

“He was really good with his kids,” his mother testified. “He’s got three young daughters.”

Ms. Farmer said of her brother, “I don’t feel like he’s ever had a chance . . . .”

Defense attorney Robert V. Bryan Jr. argued, “It’s clear Mr. Farmer was not present (at the murder) . . . not the person who pulled the trigger . . . not the person who robbed the victim.”

His client first used marijuana and alcohol at age 8, said Mr. Bryan, making the case for a lighter sentence.

“It’s difficult to say who was more culpable, but without the defendant, none of this would have happened,” Senior Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Abigail J. Owens argued. “He recruited Myi’son Ellis. He’s the one who set the whole thing in motion.”

As a result, his parents “watched their 18-year-old son die in his home.”

Judge Fisher imposed the jury’s sentences:

• 25 years in prison for murder. He faced a potential life term.

• 10 years for conspiracy, the maximum.

• 5 years for robbery, the minimum. That conviction also presented a potential life sentence.

• 3 years for the firearms charge.

The judge had the option of reducing — but not increasing — the jury’s sentences. He imposed three years of supervised probation on each charge after Mr. Farmer’s release and added 10 years of probation atop that.

Originally charged with conspiracy to commit robbery, Ms. Robinson last year pleaded guilty to a lesser charge, accessory to a homicide, and received a five-year prison sentence with 38 months suspended.

Monday’s sentencing of Mr. Farmer concludes the related cases.

Contact Editor “Lou” Emerson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-270-1845.












Fauquier has 39 new COVID cases since Friday

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
0 ·
File Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 booster shots — along with those from Pfizer — are now available in the state, the Virginia Department of Health announced Friday.
Vaccinations
62.8%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 44,715. Statewide, the rate stands at 69.4%.


57.1%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,667. Statewide, the rate stands at 62.4%.


84,949
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Sunday morning, up 335 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. Booster shots available to anyone with underlying medical condition, those living in long-term care facilities and all 65 or older.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

Fauquier has 39 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more infected patient hospitalized since Friday, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,922 since the pandemic started, with 289 hospitalizations and 85 deaths attributed to the virus.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Monday reported 5 more case than on Friday.

County schools have 33 “active cases,” with 26 among students and 7 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 427 active cases — 308 among students and 112 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 108 students and 2 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 21. A week earlier, the school system had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine.

The health department Monday morning reported 3,945 new cases and 77 more deaths statewide since Friday. Virginia deaths total 13,745 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 918,700.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,230 infected patients in their beds Monday morning, down 36 from Friday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 72,174 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,445 cases, up 38 from Friday, and its 84th and 85th deaths.

Orange County, 3,660, cases up 16, with its 55th deaths.

Madison County, 986 cases, up 6.

Rappahannock County, 575 cases, up 1.

As of Monday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 6.3 percent statewide and 10.7 percent in the health district.


Part of Fleetwood Farm sells for $9 million

Posted Monday,
October 25, 2021
0 ·
The recently-sold portion of Fleetwood Farm includes this familiar 1820 stone mill and other buildings along Route 17 north of Delaplane.
This farm on Cliffs Mill Road near Warrenton sold for $2.1 million.
This home on 10 acres near Broad Run sold for $1.6 million.
Fourteen tracts of farmland and forests, totaling 1,324 acres near Delaplane, sold last week for $9 million.

The parcels comprised part of the sprawling Fleetwood Farm that straddles Route 17 south of Paris.

The heirs of Leo Bernstein — a Washington, D.C., real estate broker, banker and philanthropist who died in 2008 — in recent years have large portions of the farm, which totaled about 3,000 acres.

The recent sale includes a four rental houses and a circa 1820 stone mill that stands along Route 17, a section of Crooked Run and a pond.

The Marshall District property had an asking price of $10.7 million, according to Realtor.com.

Peter Pejacsevich of Middleburg Real Estate represented the seller and the buyer in the recent transaction.

The sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier real estate transactions.

Also recently:

• A 118-acre farm near Warrenton sold for $2.1 million

The property on Cliffs Mill Road has an updated three-bedroom, 1-1/2-bath home built in 1958, a nine-stall barn with an office/apartment, a 60-by-90-foot indoor arena, a 90-by-120-foot outdoor arena, a large garage, other buildings and a pond.

The Marshall District farm went on the market in June with an asking price of $2.3 million, according to Realtor.com.

Beth Kramer of Century 21 New Millennium represented the seller and Paul MacMahon of Sheridan-MacMahon represented the buyer.

• A modern home on 9.9 acres near Broad Run sold for $1.6-million.

Built in an industrial style in 2008, the 5,600-square-foot home on Beverley’s Mill Road has four bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, a four-car garage and geothermal HVAC.

The Scott District property went on the market in August with an asking price of $1.5 million, according to Realtor.com.

Kristin Ahearn of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services PennFed Realty represented the seller and Susan Hensley of Hunt Country Sotheby’s International Realty represented the buyer.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Oct. 14-20, 2021:


Cedar Run District

Aran Capital Partners LLC, Mark S. Kelly as managing member, to Paul and Stephanie Wickstrom, 1.6 acres, 8149 Applewood Lane, near Warrenton, $597,500.

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as managing member, to NVR Inc., Lot 63, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, Redwinged Blackbird Drive, near Warrenton, $222,000.

Jason W. and Tara M. Stillwell to Matthew Furtado and Alissa Genovese, 5 acres, 3305 Deepview Court, near Goldvein, $477,000.

Libero Investments LLC, Jad Sarsour as sole member, to Carlos M. and Crystal L. Sarmento, 11 acres, Lot 23, Waterford Estates Subdivision, 11398 Yeats Drive, near Catlett, $570,000.

Mark S. and Karen A. Houser, trustees, to Costa Apostolakis and Pamela A. Wood, 1.5 acres, Lot 3BR-1A, Phase 2, Creekside Crossing Subdivision, 5633 Creekside Crossing, near Warrenton, $850,000.


Center District

George A. and Lisa M. Bulfon to Zachary P. Karl and Erin L. Bidwell, Lot 108, Addition to Warrenton Lakes Subdivision, 7160 King William St., near Warrenton, $460,000.

Regina L. Martin to Jared W. Newcomer and Miranda D. Dixon, Lot 109, Section C, Bear Wallow Knolls Subdivision, 532 Tiffany Court, Warrenton, $419,900.

Sean P. and Stephanie C. Lynch to Kevin J. Pitterle, Lot 11, Breezewood Subdivision, 230 Breezewood Drive, $495,000.

Dawn L. Holdsworth, trustee, to Danielle K. and Stephen H. Kerr, Lot 54, Block B, Broadview Acres Subdivision, 327 Dover Road, Warrenton, $454,900.

Darren and Cindy A. Snow to Gabriel A. Hernandez, Unit 233, Building 635, Phase 2, Warrenton Gardens Condominiums, 635 Waterloo Road, Warrenton, $182,000.

Benjamin M. and Kaitlyn B. Jester to Michael R. Sabatini, 0.3 acre, Lot 15, Raymond Farm Subdivision, 8273 Lucy Ave., near Warrenton, $645,000.

Christopher G. Parrish and Rose E. Chiaravalloit to Owen D. and Nansi N. Paun, Lot 20, Section 1, Copper Mill Subdivision, 786 General Wallace Court, Warrenton, $410,000.

Donna L. and Dane R. Harris to Erik and Karen Moore, Lot 53, Section 2, Cedar Run Subdivision, 7376 Cedar Run Drive, near Warrenton, $471,000.

Cherie and Gene A. Poll to Calvert Avenue LLC, Lot I-35, Phase 3, North Rock Subdivision, 212 North View Circle, Warrenton, $408,000.


Lee District

Caliber Homebuilder Inc. to Edward and Thecla McPhee, 1.5 aces, 7165 James Madison Highway, south of Opal, $645,087.

Cindi L. and Jane A. Hitt to Donna L. Fulcher, Lots 47 and 49, Perrows Addition to Remington, 7258 Third St., Remington, $239,000.

Jonathan N. Burton to David L. and Katharine P. Kirkham, 4 acres, Lot 4-A, Black Powder Ridge Estates Subdivision, 13672 Robert J. Drive, near Morrisville, $490,000.

Elizabeth and Ian Barclay to Juliana and Fabian P. Flores, Unit 50, Phase 9, Waverly Station Condominiums, 6220 Willow Place, Bealeton, $310,000.


Marshall District

Philip S. Thomas trust, Patricia D. Thomas as trustee, to Ramsay Matcalf, 1 acre, 687 Federal St., Paris, $490,000.

Nancy E. House to Timothy J. and Jour S. Krawczel, 5 acres, Wilson Road, northwest of Warrenton, $200,000.

Barry E. and Elizabeth A. Kramer to Cliff Mills Va. Holdings LLC, 118.5 acres, 9253, Cliff Mills Road, near Warrenton, $2,100,000.

James A. and Penelope B. Conaway, trustees, to James R. Quarantillo, 1.6 acres, 175 Winesap Lane, near Hume, $350,000.

Louis Arguello and Theresa Hudson, trustees, to Erik T. and Sheila M. Kloons, 10 acres, Lot 23, Fleetwood Farms Subdivision, 3718 Rolling Hills Drive, near Delaplane, $925,000.

Michael J. Henke, trustee, to Christopher S. and Bettina T. Stern, 35.6 acres, near Hume, $1,400,000.

Jackson Creek LLC, John Thorsen as manager, to James R. McCauley, 7.3 acres, 8728 North Wales Road, near Warrenton, $615,000.

Carol A. Aubry to Renee K. O’Connell, 5 acres, Lot 11-C, Runnymeade Farm Subdivision, 10691 Crest Hill Road, near Orlean, $650,000.

Lawrence M. and Cathy J.G. Silva to Katrina Peller, 7 acres, 10199 Dead End Road, near Delaplane, $405,000.

Moreman LLC to Fleetwood West LLC, 1,324.1 acres, 14 parcels, Winchester Road and Leeds Manor Road, near Delaplane, $9,000,000.

Blue Hills Estates LLC , Devin T. Finan as sole member, to Lakeside Homes LLC, 0.91 acre, Lot 8, Blue Hills Subdivision, off Culpeper Street, near Warrenton, $240,000.

Sharon C. Dorman to Stephen L. Clark, one-half interest, 12 acres, 9527 Springs Road, west of Warrenton, $317,500.


Scott District

Jonathan R. and Bridget R.M. Winglass to Dennis L. and Mary B. Sandala, 2.9 acres, Lot 13, Oliver Acres Subdivision, 5540 Oliver Lane, near Broad Run, $549,000.

Tyler P. Martin and Karly M. Clayton to Katherine Fitzgerald and Patricia S. Farrell, 11.7 acres, Lot 25, English Chase Subdivision, 8616 Woodward Road, near Marshall, $801,000.

Nathan L. and Karen M. Keen to Kevin L. Moffatt and Lisa M. Penhaven, 9.9 acres, 5553 Beverley’s Mill Road, near Broad Run, $1,610,000.

Steven L. Hill, Beverly Thomas and others to Carlos D.P. Cubias, 1 acre, 5189 Dovetail Lane, near Warrenton, $305,000.

Todd H. and Denise M. Okuma to Jaysyn J. and Cynthia M. Carson, 1.8 acres, Lot 22, Phase 1, Snow Hill Subdivision, 5839 Windsor Retreat, near Warrenton, $782, 11308 Silo Road, $500,000.

Robert W. Carver, trustee, to Kelly M. and Kristin E. Lane, Lot 11, Phase 7-A, Brookside Subdivision, 7187 Evan Court, near Warrenton, $760,000.

Lakeside Homes LLC, Devin T. Finan as managing member, to William C. and Rachel M. Whildin, Lot 57, Phase 13-B, Brookside Subdivision, 7143 Lake Drive, near Warrenton, $687,500.

Thomas P. and Barbara R. Sharp to Bryan and Barbara McMullen, Lot 10, Phase 1, Misty Run Estates Subdivision, 5879 Newbury St., near Warrenton, $645,000.

Richard G. and Joyce S. Cockrell to Lissa M. and Todd J. Eckert, 0.76 acres, Lot 5, 0.73 acre, Lot 20, and 0.76, Lot 6, Block 2, Broken Hills Estates Subdivision, 6729 Chestnut $469,000.

P. Douglas and Kayla V. Sloan to Michael Kimmel, 0.034 acre, half of Lot 9-B, and 0.69 acre, Lot 10-A, Block C, Rock Springs Estates Subdivision, 5081 Rock Springs Road, near Warrenton, $498,000.

James and Bonnie G. Manahan to Robert C. and Valerie K. Kelly, Lot 54-A, Land Bay G, Vint Hill Subdivision, 6851 Averbach Court, near New Baltimore, $612,200.

Anne F. Whitelaw, trustee, to Dominic F. Puchalla and Brooke F. Jones, 10.3 acres, 6015 Georgetown Road, Broad Run, $825,000.

Marjorie Ann Fletcher

Posted Friday,
October 22, 2021
0 ·

5 Friday Fauquier factoids: Enrollment up 4.3 percent

Posted Friday,
October 22, 2021
0 ·
Clockwise from left: Possible roundabout at Falmouth and Lee streets in Warrenton, Cedar Lee Middle School music students and the old fishing pier, which will get replaced at C.M. Crockett Park near Midland.
10,822

Total Fauquier County Public Schools enrollment, as of Sept. 30.

That represents an increase of 574 — or 4.3 percent — from a year earlier, when enrollment fell to 10,249 amid the pandemic and virtual instruction.

Two years ago, enrollment totaled 11,100.

This fall, Liberty High has 1,340 students, the largest enrollment of the county’s 19 public schools. Claude Thompson Elementary near Rectortown has the smallest enrollment with 259 students.


$350,000

The bid from Carolina Marine Structures Inc. to replace the fishing pier at Fauquier County’s C.M. Crockett Park near Midland.

The old pier, dating to the park’s opening in 1986, had deteriorated, prompting its removal late last year.

The new, floating structure will have “two wings allowing for elderly and/or handicapped persons to fish from the pier without walking down the ramp,” reads the board of supervisors’
Oct. 14 resolution approving the contract with the company, based in Powells Point, N.C.


$4.6 million

Total, three-year federal SAFER (Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response) grant awarded to Fauquier County on Sept. 10.

The FEMA funds will allow the county to hire 15 more firefighters, expanding coverage in outlying areas of Fauquier.

After three years, the county will assume all costs for those 15 positions.



166

The number of mental health calls to which Fauquier sheriff’s deputies had responded so far this year, as of Thursday.

Those calls have risen 22.9 percent from the same period last year, when deputies had responded to 135 mental health incidents.


$21 million

Updated Virginia Department of Transportation cost estimates for four projects under consideration for 50-50 cost sharing in the Town of Warrenton:

• $6.75 million for a roundabout at Walker Drive and East Lee Street.

• $4.1 million for Main Street improvements, including a roundabout in front of the old courthouse.

• $5.1 million for a roundabout at Falmouth, East Lee and Main streets.

• $5 million for a roundabout at Bear Wallow Road and Roebling Street.

The new estimates surprised town officials — as did some of the projects’ updated design proposals, which they had not requested.

Falmouth Street residents at an Oct. 4 public hearing also vigorously opposed the roundabout in their neighborhood, which would replace a four-way-stop intersection.

The council in November will consider whether to proceed with any of the projects, but the price tags could prompt the town to pass on applying for the grants.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
October 22, 2021
0 ·

County has 16 new COVID cases, 1 more hospitalized

Posted Friday,
October 22, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier residents have received 1,043 doses of COVID-19 vaccine over the last 7 days, according to the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
62.7%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Friday morning — a total of 44,651. Statewide, the rate stands at 69.2%.


57%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,593. Statewide, the rate stands at 62.3%.


84,614
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Friday morning, up 137 from Thursday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer will be eligible for a booster.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 16 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more infected patient hospitalized, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,883 since the pandemic started, with 288 hospitalizations and 85 deaths attributed to the virus.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Friday reported 3 more case than on Thursday.

County schools have just 28 “active cases,” with 23 among students and 5 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 422 active cases — 305 among students and 117 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 108 students and 2 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 21. A week earlier, the school system had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine.

The health department Friday morning reported 1,655 new cases and 46 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 13,668 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 914,755.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,266 infected patients in their beds Friday morning, down 45 from Thursday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 72,045 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,407 cases, up 13 from Thursday, and its 83rd death.

Orange County, 3,644, cases up 12, with its 53rd and 54th deaths.

Madison County, 980 cases, up 3, and its 21st death.

Rappahannock County, 574 cases, up 4.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 6.5 percent statewide and 10.2 percent in the health district.

Safe Rx disposal event Saturday in Warrenton

Posted Friday,
October 22, 2021
0 ·

Sandra G. Romine

Posted Thursday,
October 21, 2021
0 ·

Best Bets: Piedmont art show, Karen Jonas concert

Posted Thursday,
October 21, 2021
0 ·
Clockwise from left: Karen Jonas will perform Saturday night at Gloria’s in Warrenton; the Piedmont Regional Art Show and Sale this weekend in The Plains, and ghost tours Saturday night in Warrenton.
The weekend in Fauquier offers opportunities to immerse yourself in art, to look for birds, to deploy your swing dance moves, to learn about Warrenton’s ghosts and to hear some great music.

Perhaps among these ideas, you’ll find the activity that perfectly suits your mood and the season.


73rd Piedmont Regional Art Show and Sale
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23
Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24
Grace Episcopal Church
6057 Main St., The Plains


Fauquier’s largest art show will feature 250 works, with a jury of three accomplished artist selecting winners in the categories of oil or acrylic, watercolor, graphics, photography and other media. Guests may purchase the art. Friday night opening reception tickets $15 per person. Free admission Saturday and Sunday. Proceeds support Grace Episcopal Church’s charitable work.


Bird Walk
8 to 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 23
The Clifton Institute
6712 Blantyre Road, Warrenton


A one- to two-mile guided hike will include fields, meadows, lake edges and forest. Novice and experienced birders will look for the 900-acre preserve’s many species. Free. Registration required. Other activities Saturday will include volunteers helping to remove invasive species and an Introduction to Nature Journaling a two-hour workshop that requires reservation and a fee.


International Gold Cup
Noon Saturday, Oct. 23
Great Meadow
5089 Old Tavern Road, The Plains


The annual steeplechase meet will feature eight races over fences and on the flat. First race at 12:30 p.m. Gates open at 10 a.m. Parimutuel betting. No general admission tickets and advance ticket sales have ended. You must have a ticket or attend with a ticketed group.


Fall Farm Days
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 23-24
Sky Meadows State Park
11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane


History-themed programs, a variety of working farm exhibits and demonstrations, a children’s play area, live music and Mount Bleak House Tours. Parking fee: $10.


Fall Festival and Trunk or Treat
2 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23
Mountainside Montessori School
4206 Belvoir Road, Marshall


Mountainside’s third annual festival will feature a variety of entertainment and activities. Free admission. Elective donations will benefit the school and children’s activities.


Warrenton Ghost Tours
7 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23
Fauquier History Museum
10 Ashby St., Warrenton


The Fauquier Historical Society offers tours leaving the Fauquier History Museum every 15 minutes, with interpreters telling true tales of the spirits who haunt Old Town’s buildings and byways. Tickets: $15 with advance registration required.


Hallo-Swing with The Silver Tones
7 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23
Vint Hill Community Center
4235 Aiken Drive, Warrenton


The swing band and its vocalists will play two long sets for dancing. Beginner swing dance lesson at 7 p.m. Costumes encouraged but not required, with prize for best costume. Audience seating for those who simply want to enjoy the music. Light refreshments for sale. Admission: $15 in advance, $20 at door. Senior citizens and students $10 at door. Children 5 and younger get in free.


Karen Jonas
8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


Country and Americana singer/songwriter Karen Jonas first got national attention in 2014 with her debut album, “Oklahoma Lottery.” She and guitarist Tim Bray play concerts across the nation. Tickets: $20, free for children 12 and younger with parents or guardians. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. Concessions bar available.


Open House
Marshall Volunteer Fire & Rescue Department
10 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 24
4160 Rectortown Road


The volunteers will provide breakfast sandwiches at 10 a.m. with open house festivities starting at 11 a.m. Air Care Helicopter landing, extrication and kitchen fire demonstrations, moon bounce, face painting, water/sodas/snacks, free smoke detectors and other giveaways.


Josh Grisgsby and Country Line
4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24
Dell Amphitheatre, Northern Fauquier Community Park
4155 Monroe Parkway, Marshall


Flatbeds and Tailfins’ sixth and final “Bluegrass at the Dell” concert of the season. $15 general admission. Bring chair or blanket. No outside food or beverages permitted. Snacks and bottled water available for purchase.


Other options


Warrenton Farmers Market
8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 23
21 Main St., Warrenton

Click here for more information.


Farmers Market
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24
Archwood Green Barns
4557 Old Tavern Road, The Plains

Click here for more information.


The Flying Circus Airshow
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 24
5114 Ritchie Road, Bealeton

Click here for more information.


Click here for calendar of events.

Should gubernatorial candidates Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin release their income tax returns?

Posted Thursday,
October 21, 2021
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Probation reforms face pushback and confusion

Posted Thursday,
October 21, 2021
0 ·
File Photo
Circuit Court Judge James P. Fisher issued an opinion calling the law an unconstitutional infringement on judicial discretion.
Exactly what to do with a given probationer when he or she violates the court’s order of supervised probation is squarely within the realm of judicial discretion. These considerations may not be justly micromanaged by legislation because they necessarily require individualized analysis of considerations and circumstances too numerous to detail.
— Judge James P. Fisher
By Ned Oliver
The Virginia Mercury

When lawmakers voted to reform probation in Virginia earlier this year, they said their motive was simple: Stop people from getting sent back to prison for minor violations like missing an appointment or failing a drug test.

But three months after the new law went into effect, officials across the criminal justice system say the rules have led to confusion, inconsistent enforcement and, in some cases, deliberate pushback from judges and prosecutors.

“We spent two decades trying to reduce disparity in sentencing,” said Jody Fridley, deputy director of the Virginia Sentencing Commission, during a recent meeting. “This has just opened up the possibility for more disparity.”

The legislation lawmakers passed prohibits judges from incarcerating probationers for their first technical offense and limits punishment for a second technical offense to a maximum of 14 days in jail. Only after a third offense is a judge allowed to impose a longer sentence.

The legislation also caps probation at a maximum of five years for a felony and one year for a misdemeanor. The measure was championed by Democrats, who celebrated the new law with a bill signing that featured rapper Meek Mill, whose own experience with probation helped make the case for the new law.

But in practice, confusion remains about what exactly counts as a technical violation. To illustrate the issue, Ms. Fidley described two recent cases in which a sex offender was issued a parole violation for attempting to contact a minor online. In one jurisdiction, the probation officer wrote it up as a major violation because the terms of the probation included special provisions barring use of social media and contacting minors. The approach led to a sentence recommendation of between three months and one year.

In another jurisdiction, a probation officer cited it as a technical violation because it was interpreted more generally as failing to follow instructions, which is not considered a major violation. Because it was a first offense, no term of incarceration was recommended.

Members of the sentencing commission, which sets sentencing guidelines and tracks how often judges follow them, said they believed the issue could be resolved with further guidance.

“We can’t allow this kind of disparity to continue,” said Sen. John Edwards (D-Roanoke), who chairs the Senate’s judiciary committee. “It’s too confusing for too many people.”

Other questions about the law, however, will likely be more difficult to untangle.

The strongest rebuke of the new law has come from a circuit court judge in Loudoun County, James Fisher, who issued an opinion calling the law an unconstitutional infringement on judicial discretion. As a circuit court judge, Fisher’s ruling does not set precedent and has no bearing outside of his courtroom, but he has directed the local probation department to continue reporting violations to him using the old guidelines.

“Exactly what to do with a given probationer when he or she violates the court’s order of supervised probation is squarely within the realm of judicial discretion,” wrote Judge Fisher, who lives and also presides in Fauquier County Circuit Court. “These considerations may not be justly micromanaged by legislation because they necessarily require individualized analysis of considerations and circumstances too numerous to detail.”

Judge Fisher, who recently made news for ordering the alleged victim in a domestic violence trial jailed on a contempt charge, has a reputation for harsh sentences. But some of the issues he raised with the new law are shared by other judges, prosecutors and probation officers.

He noted it is a common practice in Loudoun and other jurisdictions to wait for multiple technical probation violations to accrue before bringing a defendant back to court. In those cases, the judge noted that multiple offenses could all be considered a first offense, meaning the judge could issue no punishment.

“An offender … who absconds from supervision after repeated probation failures and who remains at large for a lengthy period of time may be treated as a first offender for violation purposes, while a different offender who is brought to court immediately after each and every separate violation will after a third adjudication be subject to an enforcement penalty,” he wrote.

The sentencing commission reported that some judges are reportedly sidestepping that potential dilemma by simply treating each technical violation as a separate hearing, meaning that a defendant could rack up three or more offenses in a single day.

In addition to concerns about sentencing disparities caused by the disparate approaches, commission staff worried that a move by probation officers to begin sending every technical violation to court could end up hurting the criminal defendants the law was supposed to help by leaving them with an even longer criminal history than they might have faced otherwise.

They also worried that the law might be leading some judges and prosecutors toward harsher sentences in the first place.

“Some prosecutors have said they would be adjusting their plea agreements … because of the limited possibilities for returning defendants to court for public safety reason,” Ms. Fridley said. “The analogy that they use is they get one bite at the apple now. Do they take the risk?”

Supporters of the law voiced frustration with what they view as efforts to circumvent its intent.

Del. Don Scott (D-Portsmouth), who proposed the legislation, called the practice of treating multiple simultaneous violations as separate offenses an unintended loophole.

“That would not be my intent,” Del. Scott said. “Hopefully next year we’ll be able to clean the language up.”

Brad Haywood, the chief public defender in Arlington and the executive director of Justice Forward, which helped author the legislation, said the fight illustrates how deeply ingrained the ’90s-style, tough-on-crime attitude is in the criminal justice system — even as policy makers take steps toward reform.

“We’re finding a lot of people really believe in it, really committed to it,” Mr. Haywood said. “We’re developing new reform opponents in different parts of the justice system we never really anticipated.
That’s really disappointing.”

2 more COVID-19 patients hospitalized in Fauquier

Posted Thursday,
October 21, 2021
0 ·
The Virginia Department of Health reports 39 more deaths attributed to COVID-19 on Thursday.
Vaccinations
62.6%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 44,612. Statewide, the rate stands at 69.2%.


57%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,564. Statewide, the rate stands at 62.2%.


84,477
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Thursday morning, up 357 from Monday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 16 new COVID-19 cases and 2 more infected patients in hospital beds, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,867 since the pandemic started, with 287 hospitalizations and 85 deaths attributed to the virus.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Thursday reported 1 more case than on Wednesday.

County schools have just 25 “active cases,” with 20 among students and 5 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 419 active cases — 302 among students and 117 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 14. A week earlier quarantined students totaled 202.

The health department Thursday morning reported 1,779 new cases and 39 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 13,624 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 913,100.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,311 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning, down 14 from Wednesday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 72,015 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,394 cases, up 17 from Wednesday.

Orange County, 3,632, cases up 10.

Madison County, 977 cases, unchanged.

Rappahannock County, 570 cases, up 3.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 6.7 percent statewide and 10.4 percent in the health district.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
October 21, 2021
0 ·

Champion stepping down as Bealeton church pastor

Posted Wednesday,
October 20, 2021
0 ·

Katherine Pabis Suto

Posted Wednesday,
October 20, 2021
0 ·

Scientists work to catch up with Va. endangered species

Posted Wednesday,
October 20, 2021
0 ·
Department of Conservation and Recreation Photo/I.T. Wilson
The Commonwealth of Virginia lists the wood turtle as threatened. (Photo by ​​I. T. Wilson/ Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Natural Heritage Program)
Virginia’s Department of Wildlife Resources surveyors count mussels in the Clinch River.
People think of it as a tropical rainforest issue or an Arctic tundra issue, but this is happening in the rivers and forests of Virginia.
— Anne Chazal, chief biologist at Virginia’s Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Natural Heritage Inventory
By Evan Visconti
The Virginia Mercury

Following an announcement in September from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that 23 species should be declared extinct, Virginia’s environmental scientists are feeling the pressure to learn more about the commonwealth’s endangered and threatened species so they can be protected.

“That list really highlights that extinction is not just a down-the-road possibility; it’s a very real possibility that can happen now,” said Anne Chazal, chief biologist at Virginia’s Department of Conservation and Recreation’s Natural Heritage Inventory. “People think of it as a tropical rainforest issue or an Arctic tundra issue, but this is happening in the rivers and forests of Virginia.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lists 71 endangered and threatened species living in Virginia. The list is made up of fish, amphibians, reptiles, invertebrates, birds, mammals and plants.

The convergence of northern and southern habitats spanning from the Blue Ridge Mountains to the Atlantic makes Virginia ecologically unique, according to Tom Akre, program scientist at the Conservation Ecology Center at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute.

“Ecologically, Virginia is an amazing crossroads, and as a result, we have amazing biodiversity and lots of species that are threatened and endangered because they were naturally on the margins of their ranges anyways or naturally not super abundant across wide ranges,” said Dr. Akre.

Matthias Leu, associate biology professor at William and Mary, said he is concerned about the future for many of these species.

“I don’t think it’s looking very good,” said Dr. Leu. “We’re worldwide losing a lot of species across all taxons, and the sad part for a lot of these species is we don’t even know how well they’re doing before all of a sudden they’re gone.”


Habitats are changing

Sara Zeigler, a research geographer at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Coastal and Marine Science Center, said endangered species are often threatened by changes to their habitat.

“It’s this constant conflict between habitat and people,” Dr. Zeigler said.

In Virginia, Dr. Zeigler analyzed the habitat of the piping plover, a threatened shorebird that nests along Virginia’s barrier islands during the spring and summer. The piping plover requires wash-over habitats, which are created when an event such as a storm pushes sand and dunes from the beach further inland, covering much of the vegetation.

“That allows the birds to nest further back from the ocean shoreline so the nest isn’t in danger of being flooded,” said Dr. Zeigler. “It gives them a lot of visibility so they can see any predators coming from shrubs or grasses on the interior. It also gives them access to the back side of the barrier which is where they bring their chicks to forage after they hatch.”

When shorelines are developed and communities build sea walls or engineer dunes to protect from flooding, those overwash features that provide a habitat for piping plovers disappear, said Dr. Zeigler, and so do the piping plovers.

The endangered red-cockaded woodpecker is experiencing a similar problem further inland. It requires large swaths of mature pine forest to survive due in part to the fact that it is the only woodpecker that excavates nesting cavities in live trees, according to Brian van Eerden, the Nature Conservancy’s Virginia Pinelands Program director.

The southern longleaf pine forest historically provided tens of millions of acres of suitable habitat spanning south from Virginia to Florida and east all the way to Texas. “The red-cockaded woodpecker filled that niche with a large communal population structure,” said Mr. van Eerden.

“Over the course of several hundred years, starting at Jamestown with colonial activities until the 1990s, there was a degradation of forest conditions suitable for species like the red-cockaded woodpecker,” said Mr. van Eerden. “The collapse of the red-cockaded woodpecker mirrored the collapse of the habitat it depends on.”

Much of the southern pine forest was developed for agricultural land and harvested for timber. The natural role of fire in shaping the forest ecosystem was also curtailed. Without fire, the forest becomes thick and overgrown, limiting the abundance of herbaceous vegetation and causing a chain reaction that adversely affects the red-cockaded woodpecker’s source of food: insects, said Mr. van Eerden.

The Nature Conservancy manages nearly 4,000 acres of forest called the Piney Grove Preserve in Sussex County. In an effort to restore the natural habitat and return the red-cockaded woodpecker to Virginia, conservationists began an aggressive prescribed burning program, removed canopy trees, installed artificial cavities (or nests) in trees and brought in juvenile red-cockaded woodpeckers from a donor population in South Carolina, said Mr. van Eerden.

“We now have a stable enough population that we can safely contribute juvenile birds to other recovery areas, like the Great Dismal Swamp,” said Mr. van Eerden. “That’s a very convincing example of how we used science and some of the best ecological forest managers to drive population growth.”


Relying on the science

Conservation efforts across Virginia depend on scientists to monitor species’ populations and determine what a particular ecosystem or species needs in order to survive. This often requires teams of scientists to go into the field to collect data and make visual assessments.

“We really need to be outdoorsy people who enjoy going out early in the morning and late at night to get bitten by mosquitos,” said Dr. Leu. “We are always pointing into the landscape and assessing the diversity at those points, so we need to be really well versed in recognizing bird songs and frog vocalizations and identifying plant species.”

Christopher Davis, a fisheries biologist at the Virginia Marine Resources Commission, monitors endangered Atlantic sturgeon and sea turtles in Virginia waterways as part of the Protected Species Observer Program. Dr. Davis teams up with commercial gillnet fisherman to study and track any sturgeon or sea turtles that get pulled up as accidental bycatch.

If a sturgeon is caught, Dr. Davis sticks a transponder tag in it to track its movements after it is released. “We get length, weight and document any injuries that we see,” he said. “Then we get a fin clip for a DNA sample and we release it.”

Different types of tags are used to monitor sturgeon movements. A VEMCO tag utilizes a string of receivers across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel that pings the tag when it comes within range to give scientists an estimate of the number of fish coming in and out of the bay.

Additionally, scientists are utilizing new technology that can detect environmental DNA, or eDNA, in a given ecosystem to determine whether a species is present, said Dr. Akre, who used eDNA to detect threatened wood turtles in Virginia.

“In the places we worked in northern Virginia, eDNA was almost as effective as visual encounter surveys at finding wood turtles, and it’s significantly cheaper because you don’t have to pay all these people to go out there and do these surveys,” said Dr. Akre. “You don’t get an understanding of how abundant the populations are, but it is a great surveillance tool and a fairly cheap one.”

Scientists essentially take a sample of water (land and air eDNA samples are still being developed) and test it to see if they can find a particular species’ DNA. If the DNA is found in the water sample, scientists now have reason to believe that the species can be found in that ecosystem.

Brian Watson, the statewide aquatic invertebrate biologist at Virginia’s Department of Wildlife Resources, said eDNA is starting to be used to look for certain species of mussel, but the science is still in the works.

Virginia is home to a wide diversity of freshwater mussel species, several of which are endemic, or only found in one particular location. Due to freshwater mussels’ immobility, complex breeding process and overall sensitivity to changes in their ecosystem, they make up the largest portion of Virginia’s federally endangered species, said Dr. Watson.

“eDNA, if it works properly, will allow you to get into a lot of sites rapidly and at least get an answer to the question of whether a particular species is present there or not,” said Dr. Watson. “It’s definitely an interesting tool that we are pursuing for freshwater mussels.”

Given freshwater mussels’ stream bottom habitat and the sheer miles of waterways in Virginia, surveying with traditional methods can be difficult and time consuming, according to Dr. Watson.
He sees drawbacks in potential false positives or negatives with the use of eDNA, but Dr. Akre and other scientists around the world are working to make eDNA more reliable and eventually have the ability to measure population abundance.

“If we can use eDNA for abundance, then we can use it beyond just surveillance but also for monitoring how well a population is doing,” said Dr. Akre. “It does have great value in Virginia for detecting rare and endangered species.”

Fauquier COVID-19 cases total 6,851, up 24 today

Posted Wednesday,
October 20, 2021
0 ·
County public schools reported just 24 “active cases” Wednesday morning.
Vaccinations
62.5%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 44,529. Statewide, the rate stands at 69%.


56.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,491. Statewide, the rate stands at 62.1%.


84,120
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning, up 221 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 24 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,851 since the pandemic started, with 285 hospitalizations and 85 deaths attributed to the virus.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Wednesday reported 3 more cases than on Tuesday.

But, county schools have just 24 “active cases,” continuing to decline, with 19 among students and 5 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 418 active cases — 301 among students and 117 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 14. A week earlier quarantined students totaled 202.

The health department Wednesday morning reported 1,822 new cases and 47 more deaths statewide. Virginia deaths total 13,585 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 911,321.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,325 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning, down 61 from Tuesday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 71,928 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,377 cases, up 21 from Tuesday, and its 82nd death attributed to COVID-19.

Orange County, 3,622, cases up 18.

Madison County, 977 cases, up 2.

Rappahannock County, 567 cases, up 1.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 6.8 percent statewide and 10.3 percent in the health district.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
October 20, 2021
0 ·

Gertrude “Gertie” Marshall

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·

Former Fauquier Bank downtown property for sale

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·
Photo/Commercial Real Estate Services Inc.
The headquarters branch (left) and Wealth Management Building stand on 1.6 acres with 89 parking spaces.
The Fauquier Bank opened its Courthouse Square headquarters on July 26, 1971. The bank and its successor have operated downtown offices since 1902.
don’t know who the buyer will be, but my gut tells me it will be someone from outside the area.
— Bill Chipman, commercial real estate broker
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The most prominent commercial real estate in Old Town Warrenton has gone on the market.

Charlottesville-based Virginia National Bank wants $7.5 million for The Fauquier Bank’s former headquarters/main branch and adjacent Wealth Management building.

The two buildings — totaling 36,000 square feet — and 89 parking spaces cover 1.6 acres with frontage on Alexandria Pike and Diagonal, Waterloo and Winchester streets.

For tax purposes, the county assesses the property, composed of four parcels, at $6.73 million.

“I don’t think there’s anything similar to it,” said Warrenton broker Bill Chipman, whose Commercial Real Estate Services Inc. (CRES) listed the property for sale Wednesday, Oct. 13. “It’s kind of the corner of Main Street and Main Street.”

The “Courthouse Square” property lies across the intersection from Fauquier’s historic 1890 courthouse.

Completing its acquisition of TFB in a “merger of equals,” Virginia National in April consolidated headquarters operations at its main building in Charlottesville.

The bank continues to operate a branch at Courthouse Square, but much of TFB’s contact with banking customers already had shifted to the two-story brick structure it built in 2009 at 87 W. Lee Highway.

“I think the first natural buyer would be the county; we’ll see where that goes,” Mr. Chipman said of the downtown property.

County officials, including board of supervisors members, have toured the property, but all of them refused to comment.

“The other would be someone from outside the area who sees the opportunity,” Mr. Chipman suggested. “I don’t know who the buyer will be, but my gut tells me it will be someone from outside the area.”

With Central Business District zoning, the property has a variety of potential uses — including office, residential, retail and restaurant, he said.

VNB officials failed to respond to phone calls and emails seeking comment for this story.

VNB President Glenn Rust on Wednesday issued a “press statement” that says in part: “The 36,000-square-foot property at 10 Courthouse Square has been a topic of interest for many years. The Fauquier Bank (TFB) began gauging interest in the sale prior to the merger with Virginia National Bank.

“As conversations have been good, a corporate decision has been made to continue our due diligence and list the property for sale at $7.5 million. Historic Old Town Warrenton has continued to grow over the past few years with new life emerging quickly. As our headquarters is in Charlottesville, we believe the space may be better served for new growing businesses.

“Our team has called the Old Town Warrenton location home for many years and it has served our team, the community, and our shareholders well. We look forward to watching Historic Old Town Warrenton continue to grow.”

VNB Director of Retail Abbie Ford added: “The possibilities for the current Old Town Warrenton location are endless. However, regardless of what the future holds for the building, our Old Town Warrenton valued associates will serve clients at other nearby branch locations.”

The Fauquier Bank opened its Courthouse Square headquarters on July 26, 1971.

VNB has yet to change the signs on the 11 former TFB branches in Fauquier and Prince William.

But, if the Charlottesville bank closes the Old Town branch, it would end a downtown operation that dates to 1902.

The Fauquier Bank started March 7 that year in rented space at 7 Culpeper St. with $25,000 in local capital.

On Sept. 23, 1925, it opened the building at Hotel and Court streets — built at a cost of $69,850.

The bank and the late Edward L. Stephenson donated that building, then valued at $150,000, to the Town of Warrenton on April 10, 1973. Town Hall remained there until last year, when Warrenton’s government moved to the former BB&T building at 21 Main St.

The Fauquier Bank opened the four-story, 16,100-square-foot Wealth Management Building, a $2-million project, in September 1988.

The three-level main building totals 19,900 square feet.

Both structures have undergone recent renovations, Mr. Chipman said.

Contact Editor “Lou” Emerson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-270-1845.

Stops Along the Way: Legacy and the long road

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·

How has your household’s weekly spending for groceries changed in the last year?

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·

County has 2 more COVID deaths, as cases slow

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·
The number of “active cases” in county public schools stands at 25 — down 20 from Monday morning.
Vaccinations
62.5%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Tuesday morning — a total of 44,529. Statewide, the rate stands at 69%.


56.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,491. Statewide, the rate stands at 62.1%.


84,120
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday morning, up 221 from Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
The number of new COVID-19 cases has dropped, but Fauquier has two more deaths attributed to the virus and 3 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s deaths total 85 since the pandemic started, with 285 hospitalizations.

Up just 9 Tuesday morning, the county’s cases total 6,827 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Tuesday reported 2 more cases than on Monday.

But, county schools have just 25 “active cases,” down 20 from Monday, with 17 among students and 8 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 415 active cases — 299 among students and 116 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 14. A week earlier quarantined students totaled 202.

The health department Tuesday morning reported just 1,617 new cases statewide, but 52 more deaths. Virginia deaths total 13,538 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 909,499.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,386 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, down 2 from Monday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 71,882 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,356 cases, up 25 from Monday.

Orange County, 3,604, cases up 13, and its 52nd death.

Madison County, 975 cases, up 6.

Rappahannock County, 566 cases, up 3.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 6.8 percent statewide and 10.1 percent in the health district.


Abortion is not “a blessing” or “an act of love”

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
October 19, 2021
0 ·

Richard L. Vernaci

Posted Monday,
October 18, 2021
0 ·

240-acre Middleburg farm sells for $12 million

Posted Monday,
October 18, 2021
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The 240-acre Ardarra Farm, along Zulla Road about two miles south of Middleburg, sold for $12 million.
This home and 41 acres on Keyser Road near Hume sold for $1.5 million.
A 240-acre Northern Fauquier farm, near Middleburg, sold recently for $12 million.

Built in 1933 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the main house at Ardarra Farm has seven bedrooms, five bathrooms and two half-baths.

The Scott District property along Zulla Road includes a stable, two tenant houses, a guest house, a gazebo, a swimming pool, a tennis court and a large pond.

The Virginia Outdoors Foundation holds a conservation easement on the property.

John Coles of Thomas and Talbot Estate Properties represented the seller.

The Scott District property last sold for $4.85 million in October 2000.

Also recently:

• A home on 41 acres near Hume sold for $1.5 million.

Built in 2001, the home on Keyser Road has three bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, a great room with a stone fireplace, a sunroom, a screened porch and a three-car garage, with an upstairs apartment.

The Marshall District property also has a seven-stall barn with a grooming area, heated tack room and a large hayloft.

• A home on 30 acres near Midland sold for $1.3 million.

Built in 2009, the home has four bedrooms and 4 bathrooms, a wraparound front porch, a deck and a three-car garage.

The Cedar Run District property also features a 24-stall Belmont barn, two machine sheds and nine fenced paddocks.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Oct. 6-13, 2021:


Cedar Run District

NVR Inc. to Evelyn and Eric Omohundro, 0.59 acre, Lot 67, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3944 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $839,070.

NVR Inc. to Neil A. and Jessica H. Brandt, Lot 56, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 7730 Warrenton Chase Drive, near Warrenton, $804,455.

Marinos and Katherine J. Kalmoutis to Mary and Charles E. Small Jr., 30.4 acres, 4386 Catlett Road, Midland, $1,300,000.


Center District

Beverly J. Wynn to Matthew J. Cain, Unit 211, Group 9, Phase 2, Leeds Square Subdivision, 211 Fairfield Drive, Warrenton, $250,000.

Julie E. Hopkins and George G. Hocker to Joseph and Alexandra Pelczar, Lot 32, Edgemont Subdivision, 196 Autumn Wind Court, Warrenton, $650,000.

Urzua and Miguel A. Cadiz to Kyle D. Graham and Sarah A. Arnold, 0.3 acre, Lot 6, Kimberley Subdivision 13160 Brenda Court, Warrenton, $655,000.

James E. and Alisa Mitchell to Ronald E. and Delores R. Plum Lot 36, Section 1, Cedar Run Subdivision, 7334 Cedar Run Drive, near Warrenton, $489,000.

Cheriton Properties LLC, G. Woodson Joynes as manager, to Rock Investments LLC, 75, 77 and 79 Horner St. and 54 N. Fourth St., Warrenton, $270,000.

Jesse D. Kopach and Lisa B. Miller to James P. Gannon, Townhouse 14-A, Phase 1, Leeds Square, 94-A Leeds Court, Warrenton, $203,717.

Muwafaq and Ola Ali to Brandon R. and Amanada R. Kahnell, Lot 17, Chestnut Turn Subdivision, 7317 Hazelwood Court, near Warrenton, $535,000.


Lee District

Adam R. Beard to Manuela Lainez and Alfaro and Maria Alfaro, Lot 89, Section 2, Phase 4, Lee’s Glen Subdivision, 11726 Fort Lee Drive, near Remington, $430,000.

Gunjan Vatas to Angela R. and Dustin J. Kent, Lot 99, Phase 3, Southcoate Village Subdivision, 11139 Eagle Court, near Bealeton, $475,000.

Bruce H. Andrews Jr. to Jeremias A. E. Aguinada, 1 acre, 5206 Sumerduck Road, Sumerduck, $365,000.

Katelynn A. Garman and Anne P. Sarubbi-Garman to Steve Digby, Unit J, Building 2, Cedar Lee Condominiums, 11238 Torrie Way, Bealeton, $163,500.

Donna L. Fulcher to Jose L.M. Rosas, Lot 219, Section Q, Meadowbrooke Subdivision, 6716 Huntland Drive, Bealeton, $407,000.

Debra T. Helm to DDH Real Estate LLC, Unit G, Building 3, Cedar Lee Condominiums, 11228 Torrie Way, Bealeton, $166,000.

Cranes Corner LLC to Mathai Manassas Holdings LLC, 2.1 acres, 6225 Patrick Henry Blvd., Bealeton, $90,000.

Francisco and Stephanie M. Laze to Debra M. Taylor, Lot 39, Phase 3, Rappahannock Landing Subdivision, 2242 Sedgewick Drive, Remington, $375,000.

Sierra D. and Chassidy A. Surface to Marvin Griffin, Lot 1, Phase 1, Crestwood Knolls Subdivision 6635 Schoolhouse Road, Bealeton, $315,000.

Eun H. Lim to Jesus A.M. Lucas and Jaime E.R. Mendez, 2.3 acres, 11149 James Madison Highway, near Bealeton, $335,000.


Marshall District

Stephen E. Miller to Robert Davis, Lot 3, Carter Subdivision, 8474 Emerald Lane, Marshall, $200,000.

Gail S. Keys, trustee, to Anne E. and Eric M. Diello, 40.9 acres, 5742 Keyser Road, near Hume, $1,519,962.

Wayne G. and Margaret D. Carson to Michael Winning, 10 acres, Lot 3, Piedmont Springs Subdivision, Red Fox Lane, near Warrenton, $249,000.

Melissa R. Shaver to Donald Citro and Sarah Johnson, 0.56 acre, 6476 Corbin Lane, near Warrenton, $350,000.

Robert M. Southworth, trustee, to Christina M. and Felix Beltran Jr., 6.1 acres, Lot 4, Carters Run Estates Subdivision, 8054 Willboyd Court, near Orlean, $780,000.

Laura T. McClure to Gale A. Johnson and Brian M. Moore, 3.4 acres, 11166 Kilkenny Road, near Marshall, $600,000.

Larry M. Williams, Angel M. Pullen and others to Moonlight Woods LLC, 0.97 acre, 8276 Opal Road, near Warrenton, $125,000.


Scott District

Steven G. Lamb to Haocia and Shirley X. Wen, 236.1 acres, 2337 Zulla Road, south of Middleburg, $12,000,000.

Wanda and Theodore Pritekel to Gregory A. and Elizabeth A. Prasad-Hanweck, Lot 15, Phase 3, Brookside Subdivision, 6890 Emma Court, near Warrenton, $981,100.

B.F. Stephens Inc. to Eric and Susan Moore, 1.5 acres, 6746 Chestnut Oak Lane, near Warrenton, $572,000.

Edgar A. Deborah L. and Robert F. Lunsford Jr. and others to Tanner R. Dudley, 1.5 acres, 7341 Bunker Hill road, near The Plains, $270,000.

Maximilian B. Steiner to Jetti P. Pifer and Christopher Whitley, Lot 124, Section 2, Addition to Marstella Estates Subdivision, 7295 Forrest Road, near Warrenton, $368,000.

Imo Jean Williams

Posted Monday,
October 18, 2021
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Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
October 18, 2021
0 ·

Betsy Dietel succeeds Knott as PATH board chairperson

Posted Monday,
October 18, 2021
0 ·
Contributed Photos
Betsy Dietel joined the PATH board in 2018, the same year Ray Knott started his chairmanship of the foundation, which has an endowment of about $250 million.
Sallie Morgan, retied executive director of the Mental Health Association of Fauquier County, succeeds Janelle Downes as a PATH board member.
Betsy Dietel has succeeded Raymond C. Knott as chairperson of the Warrenton-based PATH Foundation.

A senior partner with Dietel and Partners, a philanthropic advising firm in Flint Hill, Ms. Dietel also lives in Rappahannock County.

Mr. Knott, market president for Atlantic Union Bank in Warrenton, lives in Culpeper County. He succeeded John McCarthy as PATH chairman in 2018.

Ms. Dietel joined the 15-member PATH board the same year.

“We are truly thankful for Ray’s leadership over the last three years of service to the PATH Foundation,” she said. “With his guidance, the PATH Foundation has increased its investment in the community, and Ray’s work has been invaluable to the foundation’s growth and work towards its mission to increase community health and vitality.”

The change took place at the September board meeting, where it selected Sallie Morgan to succeed Janelle Downes, whose board tenure ended this term.

A Rappahannock County resident, Ms. Morgan retired as executive director of the Mental Health Association of Fauquier County and previously worked as director of Community Support Services at Rappahannock-Rapidan Community Services, where she helped found the Area Agency on Aging.

During Mr. Knott’s tenure, the PATH Foundation:

• Helped provide funding in support of affordable housing projects, including Millview Apartments, Ann Wingfield Commons, Habitat for Humanity and critical home repair efforts.

• Provided continuing financial support for the FRESH program in Fauquier County schools and Commit to Be Fit in Rappahannock County.

• Invested in Herren Wellness at Twin Oaks, the first residential addiction recovery center in Warrenton.

• Helped establish the Virginia Funder’s Network, a nonprofit association of nearly 100 grantmaking organizations that are dedicated to collaborating and learning together, with the end goal of improving the quality of life for all Virginian.

• Continued funding for the Fauquier Free Clinic’s telehealth therapy and dental clinic programs.

At the end of Mr. Knott’s tenure as chairman, PATH had invested a total of more than $48 million in the community through grants programs to local organizations.

Funded with proceeds from Fauquier Health’s sale to LifePoint Health in 2013, the foundation has an endowment of about $250 million.

“It has been a privilege to work with the PATH Foundation over the last few years,” Mr. Knott said. “I’m grateful for a chance to directly impact my community and would like to thank my peers on the board for their diligent work in ensuring that Fauquier, Culpeper and Rappahannock counties remain healthy and vibrant communities.”
Board of Directors page

Fauquier has 4 more COVID-19 hospitalizations

Posted Monday,
October 18, 2021
0 ·
Monday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health includes 95 more deaths since Friday.
Vaccinations
62.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Sunday morning — a total of 44,475. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.9%.


56.8%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,343. Statewide, the rate stands at 62%.


83,899
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Sunday, up 328 from Friday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 42 new COVID-19 cases since Friday and 4 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Monday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,818 since the pandemic started, with 282 hospitalizations.

Fauquier County Public Schools on Monday reported 6 more cases than Friday.

County schools have 45 “active cases,” with 34 among students and 11 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 413 active cases — 297 among students and 116 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 132 students and 4 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 14. A week earlier quarantined students totaled 202.

The health department Monday morning reported 95 more deaths and 4,944 new cases statewide since Friday. Virginia deaths total 13,486 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 907,882.

Fauquier has 83 deaths attributed to COVID-19 since the pandemic started.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,388 infected patients in their beds Monday morning, down 86 since Friday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 71,742 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,331 cases, up 35 from Friday, and its 80th and 81st deaths attributed to COVID-19.

Orange County, 3,591 cases, up 28.

Madison County, 969 cases, up 9.

Rappahannock County, 563 cases, up 4.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 7 percent statewide and 9.7 percent in the health district.


Katherine Maria Vogler

Posted Sunday,
October 17, 2021
0 ·

Douglas E. Gardner Sr.

Posted Saturday,
October 16, 2021
0 ·

Thomas F. Lyons Jr.

Posted Saturday,
October 16, 2021
0 ·

Eleanor Knight

Posted Saturday,
October 16, 2021
0 ·

$20-million Cedar Lee expansion under way

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·
Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Principal Leah Shorb (right) joins school officials and Supervisor Chris Butler in Friday’s ceremonial groundbreaking at Cedar Lee Middle School in Bealeton.
There is no better place to work. There is no better community to serve.
— Principal Leah Shorb
After years of debate and planning, a ceremonial groundbreaking took place Friday morning for the $20-million expansion and renovation of Cedar Lee Middle School in Bealeton.

The general contractor, Culpeper-based Taft Construction Inc. actually started work Thursday, Oct. 7.

The project should be complete in May 2023, with the building ready for the new term that fall.

The work, expanding the school’s capacity by 300 students to a total of 1,000, will include:

• An academic addition with 12 to 14 classrooms .

• A new auxiliary gym.

• Renovation of the cafeteria and expansion of food storage.

• A new bus loop and expanded parking.

• Expansion of the office with a new school entrance.

• Replacement of all HVAC equipment.

After the school board and county supervisors argued for years about potential middle school projects, they finally reached consensus in early 2020. The plan calls for expansion and renovation of Taylor Middle School in Warrenton, estimated to cost $41 million, after the Cedar Lee project’s completion.

Ultimately, Warrenton Middle would close, leaving the county seat with one school for Grades 6-8.

Cedar Run District school board member Donna Grove and Supervisor Chris Butler (Lee District) took part in discussions that finally broke the impasse between the two boards.

“Keeping kids in school district where they live” helped motivate Mr. Butler to work toward the solution, he said. Many from the Opal and Bealeton area ride buses to and from schools in Warrenton.

Ms. Grove credited the community for coming together to move from “an idea to a shared vision.”

School board members Stephanie Litter-Reber said the Cedar Lee project will serve students well, “creating a 21st-century learning environment.”

Principal Leah Shorb, a member of the school staff since 2005, also praised the collaborative effort that produced the expansion and renovation plan.

“There is no better place to work,” Ms. Shorb said. “There is no better community to serve.”

The board of supervisors approved debt of $15 million to help fund the project. The school board will contribute cash to cover 10 percent of the cost, with the supervisors funding the balance from reserves.

Cedar Lee dates 1973, with expansions in 1998 and 2006. The existing, single-story brick building covers 105,000 square feet.



Bobby Gene Smith

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·

Norflk man charged with beating fellow inmate

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·
Michael Lewis (left) allegedly beat fellow Fauquier County Adult Detention Center inmate Nicholas Murphy badly Thursday.
UPDATE: Nicholas Murphy has been released from the hospital and transferred to the Northwest Regional Detention Center at Winchester, the sheriff’s office reported Saturday morning. Authorities described his injuries as “non-life-threatening.”

A Fauquier jail inmate faces a malicious wounding charge for allegedly severely beating a fellow inmate Thursday morning.

A sheriff’s detective charged, Michael Lewis, 25, of Norfolk, for injuring Nicholas Murphy, 36, of Warrenton.

The inmates “got into a verbal altercation that became physical inside their cellblock,” Sgt. Steve Lewis said. “During the incident, Lewis physically assaulted Murphy causing injury. Murphy was transported to a hospital for medical treatment.”

Mr. Murphy’s medical treatment included intubation — insertion of a breathing tube — before a helicopter flew him to a trauma center, where the inmate remained Friday afternoon, according to Sgt. Lewis.

Deputies discovered the injured inmate at 11:47 a.m. in his cell at the Fauquier County Adult Detention Center on West Lee Street in Warrenton.

The jail on Thursday held 54 inmates, about half its maximum capacity.

“Murphy was also involved in another incident on Oct 9, where he approached another inmate in an aggressive manner and began fighting with him striking the other inmate multiple times with a closed fist,” Sgt. Lewis said. “Evidence led deputies to place charges on Murphy for assault and battery.

“Murphy was relocated to another cell block after the incident occurred. Lewis and Murphy remain incarcerated at the Fauquier County Adult Detention Center with no bond.

The investigation of Thursday’s incident continues, Sgt. Lewis said.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·

Taxable value of county real estate rises 22% in 4 years

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·
Stock Photo
Starting a year ago, the county’s reassessment contractor visited all 34,000 Fauquier real estate parcels to help determine updated values.
I’m sure you guys’ phones will be ringing, just like mine.
— Commissioner of Revenue Eric Maybach
Reassessment
• What: Values all county real estate every 4 years for tax purposes.

• Total market value: $16.8 billion — up from $13.6 billion four years ago.

• Total taxable value: Up 22 percent after discounts for the elderly, veterans and “land use” properties.

• Notices: Mailed to property owners Monday, Oct. 18.

• New assessments: Effective Jan. 1, 2022.

• First bills with new values: Due in June 2022.

• Details: The board of supervisors in March will adjust the real estate tax rate, which stands at 99.4 cents per $100 assessed value, to prevent bills from rising as much as the new assessments.

• More information and appeals: Click here for reassessment website.
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The taxable value of Fauquier real estate has risen an average of 22 percent over the last four years, according to the county’s reassessment contractor.

Notices of the new values will go in the mail to property owners Monday, Oct. 18, Commissioner of Revenue Eric Maybach told the board of supervisors Thursday afternoon.

“I’m sure you guys’ phones will be ringing, just like mine,” Mr. Maybach said, noting that property owners should receive the new assessments later next week.

But, real estate tax bills won’t rise 22 percent when the new assessments take effect next year, county officials stressed.

The supervisors always adjust the tax rate after reassessment — typically to keep property owner’s bills close to previous levels.

The new values will take effect Jan. 1, and property owners will have opportunities to challenge the reassessments on a case-by-case basis.

The first tax bills reflecting new assessments will be due in June. Fauquier splits real estate taxes into two annual bills, due in June and December.

Fauquier’s real estate tax rate of 99.4 cents per $100 of assessed value means the owner of an “average” single-family home valued at $378,000 pays $3,757 per year.

Wampler-Eanes Appraisal Group Ltd. of Daleville started visiting all 34,000 real estate parcels last fall to determine the new values. Its $1-million contract with the county paid the company $29.25 per parcel.

Four years ago, Fauquier’s assessed property values rose an average of 16 percent. Wampler-Eanes has handled all recent Fauquier reassessments, conducted every four years, as required by the Code of Virginia.

Overall, the company determined Fauquier’s real estate values rose 23.76 percent in “market value” and 25.6 percent in “taxable value.”

But, tax breaks for the elderly, veterans and “use value,” including agriculture and open space, produce a net increase of 22 percent in taxable value, Mr. Maybach explained.

Countywide, the value of buildings rose 35.6 percent, while the value of land increased 9.1 percent.

The total market value of the county’s real estate stands at $16.8 billion versus $13.6 billion four years ago.

For more information, visit the county reassessment website.

Contact Editor “Lou” Emerson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-270-1845.

33 new COVID-19 cases reported in Fauquier

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·
Stock Photo
County public schools have 132 students, down 70 from last week.
Vaccinations
62.4%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Friday morning — a total of 44,407. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.7%.


56.5%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,328. Statewide, the rate stands at 61.8%.


83,571
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Friday, up 369 from Wednesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 33 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,776 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 1 more case Friday morning.

County schools have 49 “active cases,” with 37 among students and 12 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 407 active cases — 292 among students and 115 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 132 students and 5 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 14. A week earlier quarantined students totaled 202.

The health department Friday morning reported 46 more deaths and 2,357 new cases statewide since Thursday. Virginia deaths total 13,391 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 902,938.

Fauquier has 83 deaths attributed to COVID-19 since the pandemic started, and hospitalizations total 278 — both unchanged Friday.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,474 infected patients in their beds Friday morning, down 59 since Thursday.

Virginia hospitalizations total 71,548 since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,296 cases, up 19 from Thursday.

Orange County, 3,563 cases, up 18.

Madison County, 960 cases, up 2.

Rappahannock County, 559 cases, up 5.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 7.5 percent statewide and 10.5 percent in the health district.

Voters have clear choice in 18th District House election

Posted Friday,
October 15, 2021
0 ·

Youngkin’s rally draws 300 to park in Warrenton

Posted Thursday,
October 14, 2021
0 ·
This is not about me. It’s about all of you.
— Glenn Youngkin, Republican candidate for governor
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Republican candidate for governor Glenn Youngkin stressed kitchen table issues — education, fiscal responsibility and law enforcement — at a campaign rally that drew 300 people to a Warrenton park Thursday.

“It is no longer Republicans versus Democrats in Virginia,” Mr. Youngkin said from atop a hay wagon in Warrenton’s Eva Walker Park. “It’s Virginians standing together.”

He distanced himself from a campaign event Wednesday in Richmond that featured former presidential adviser Steve Bannon, a call from the former President Trump and a flag that protestors carried in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Mr. Youngkin did not attend that event.

“The person that’s going to be campaigning here for the next 2-1/2 weeks is Glenn Youngkin,” he told reporters Thursday. “I am on the ballot.”

Later Thursday, he issued a statement that says it part: “While I had no role in last night’s event, I have heard about it from many people in the media today. It is weird and wrong to pledge allegiance to a flag connected to January 6. As I have said many times before, the violence that occurred on January 6 was sickening and wrong . . . .

“With regard to January 6, there is no room for violence in America. None. Absolutely not. And therefore, I think there's just no room for it. We must condemn it every day of the week.”

In his first campaign for elective office, the 54-year-old retired private equity firm CEO faces Democrat Terry McAuliffe, seeking to become on the second person in modern Virginia history to win election a second time as governor.

Mr. Younkin bashed Mr. McAuliffe for suggesting parents have no business telling schools what to teach.

“He thinks government should stay between parents and their children,” the Republican candidate told the enthusiastic, midday audience in Warrenton.

Mr. Youngkin pledged to expand education choice, helping to create more charter schools in Virginia, which he said has only eight, versus 140 in Maryland and 190 in North Carolina.

He vowed that public schools would remain open for in-person learning five days a week and that lagging test scores would rise under his administration.

Funding for schools would increase, even as he pledged to cut taxes — on groceries, gasoline and income for military veterans, Mr. Youngkin said.

Virginia’s $2.6-billion budget surplus should go back to citizens, he said.

Pledging to eliminate “Critical Race Theory” in public schools, he said: “It’s in the commonwealth, we know it. We will teach history — all of it, the good and the bad. In the words of Martin Luther King, let’s judge people “not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

Mr. Youngkin pledged more support for law enforcement and a focus on crime reduction. He immediately would “fire” members of the state parole board, which has drawn criticism for releasing violent offenders from prison.

Vowing to increase government efficiency, he promised an across-the-board audit of state agencies, starting with the Virginia Employment Commission and the Department of Motor Vehicles.

“This is not about me,” he said near the end of a 15-minute speech. “It’s about all of you.”

The candidate waded into the crowd, talking with people and posing for photos another 30 minutes after his speech.

He then headed west for campaign stops in Luray and Harrisonburg.

Longtime Republican activist Chuck Medvitz of New Baltimore said Mr. Youngkin has a great chance of winning the Nov. 2 election, in part because of an “enthusiasm gap” that Democrats face.

Republicans haven’t won a statewide office since Bob McDonnell’s 2009 election as governor. But, polls indicate a very close race this year.

In Fauquier, a GOP stronghold, Republicans have averaged 60 percent of the vote in the last five gubernatorial elections.

Contact Editor “Lou” Emerson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 540-270-1845.






Best Bets: Concerts and autumn activities abound

Posted Thursday,
October 14, 2021
0 ·
Clockwise from left: Beppe Gambetta will perform Saturday at Gloria’s in Warrenton, Fall Farm Days at Sky Meadows State Park this weekend and the Paragon Philharmonia ensemble will present a concert Sunday at Grace Episcopal Church in The Plains.
The weekend offers a variety of musical performances and festive fall activities around Fauquier.


Fall Festival
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16.
Family Worship Center
12077 Marsh Road, Bealeton


The event will feature pony rides, hayrides, moon bounce, bake sale, corn hole, vendors and live music. Free.


Fall Farm Days
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 16-17
Sky Meadows State Park
11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane


The “Rest and Rejuvenation Weekend” will feature a geocaching demonstration, camping tips, a variety of working farm exhibits and demonstrations, a children’s play area, live music and Mount Bleak House Tours. Parking fee: $10.


Walk with a Naturalist
1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16
The Clifton Institute
6712 Blantyre Road, Warrenton


A Clifton staff member will lead the hike on trails of the 900-acre preserve near Warrenton. Free. Registration required.


“Ghosts in the Garden”
Remington Farmers Market
4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16
Remington Community Garden
150 W. Bowen St., Remington


The event will feature hayride tours of historical haunted locations in town, crafts, music by Dan Carter, a food truck, s’mores and cider. Free admission.


Jules and the Agreeables
8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


Singer/songwriter Juliana MacDowell, who splits time between Loudoun County and Key West, has recorded several albums. Doors and concessions bar open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20, free for children 12 and younger with parents.


Paragon Philharmonia concert
5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17
Grace Episcopal Church
6507 Main St., The Plains


The church ensemble in residence will present a concert of orchestral music by Bach, Mendelssohn and Mozart. COVID-19 vaccination proof required for audience members. Tickets: $25 for adults, $15 for students, free for those younger than 18.


Beppe Gambetta
8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


The master guitarist and composer will perform a variety of music with international influences, including selections from his new release, “Where the Wind Blows.” Doors and concessions bar open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20, free for children 12 and younger with parents.


Other options


Warrenton Farmers Market
8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 16
21 Main St., Warrenton

Click here for more information.


Farmers Market
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17
Archwood Green Barns
4557 Old Tavern Road, The Plains

Click here for more information.


The Flying Circus Airshow
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17
5114 Ritchie Road, Bealeton

Click here for more information.


Click here for calendar of events.

Traffic pattern will change at Marshall ramp to I-66W

Posted Thursday,
October 14, 2021
0 ·

County has 23 new COVID cases, 5 more hospitalized

Posted Thursday,
October 14, 2021
0 ·
So far, 68.5 percent of Virginia residents have received at least one dose of vaccine.
Vaccinations
62.2%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 44,324. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.5%.


56.5%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,245. Statewide, the rate stands at 61.5%.


83,202
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 23 new COVID-19 cases and 5 more infected patients in hospital beds, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,743 since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 2 more cases Thursday morning.

County schools have 48 “active cases,” with 36 among students and 12 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 406 active cases — 291 among students and 115 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 202 students and 5 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 7, the most recent update.

The health department Thursday morning reported 60 more deaths and 2,603 new cases statewide since Wednesday. Virginia deaths total 13,345 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 900,581.

Fauquier has 83 deaths attributed to COVID-19 since the pandemic started.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,533 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning, down 43 since Wednesday.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,277 cases, up 15 from Wednesday.

Orange County, 3,545 cases, up 14.

Madison County, 958 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 554 cases, up 3.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 7.5 percent statewide and 10.9 percent in the health district.


Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
October 14, 2021
0 ·

Dorothy J. Childress

Posted Thursday,
October 14, 2021
0 ·

Should Warrenton work with a company that wants to provide e-scooter rentals in town?

Posted Wednesday,
October 13, 2021
0 ·

Orlean volunteers to serve county breakfast Sunday

Posted Wednesday,
October 13, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
October 13, 2021
0 ·

Jeannette “Jean” Payne

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·

Youngkin in town Thursday for GOP campaign rally

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·

Remington volunteers serve ‘drive-thru’ chicken Sunday

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·

Vint Hill data center site sells for $8.75 million

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·
Photo/Google Earth
Composed of three parcels, this site at Vint Hill sold for $8.75 million.
Three parcels totaling 47.6 acres and zoned for data center development at Vint Hill sold recently for $8.75 million.

The board of supervisors in November 2018 voted unanimously to rezone the property, allowing up to 24 percent more building density, specifically for data centers.

The three undeveloped parcels lie along the Vint Hill Parkway, Vint Hill Road and McIntosh Drive.

The Puller Veterans Care Center, under construction, stands across the Vint Hill Parkway, with the Federal Aviation Administration’s Potomac TRACON center just to the south.

French company OVH has operated a data center at Vint Hill since 2017.

County officials consider data centers an important potential source of tax revenue with relatively little demand for public services.

The Scott District sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier property transactions.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Sept. 30-Oct. 5, 2021:


Cedar Run District

Jeffery A. Fisher and Kaitlin V. Akacki to Darlyn D. and Oscar A. Paniagua, 0.6 acre, Lot 3, Lomax Division, 10113 Elk Run Road, Catlett, $330,000.

NVR Inc. to Seth A. and Amanda O. Bowie, 0.7 acre, Lot 69, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3958 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $755,296.

NVR Inc. to Sarah C. and Ryan S. Dehaven, 0.62 acre, Lot 68, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3952 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $810,225.

NVR Inc. to Austin D. Andrade and Austin D. Andrade and Catarin C. Lozano, 0.7 acre, Lot 66, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, 3940 Saddle Ridge Court, near Warrenton, $762,300.


Center District

Mark and Sandra Schmidt to Steven Presti and Mireya Clark, Lot J-37, Phase 3, North Rock Subdivision, 216 North View Circle, Warrenton, $490,000.

XS Partners LLC to David A. and Christine M. Garcia, 2,047 square feet, 63 Main St., Warrenton, $455,000.

Gregory J. and Christine A. Cherundolo to Justin C. and Cynthia L. Slaybaugh, Lot 82, Section 2C, Olde Gold Cup Subdivision, 704 Lancrel Road, Warrenton, $615,000.

Ronald C. and Janet L. Pence to Kyle S. Cherry, Unit 37, Hillside Townes, 210 Aviary St., Warrenton, $299,000.

Prasad C. and Jyothi Gadde to Walter F. Morton Jr., 19,469 square feet, 286 Waterloo St., Warrenton, $425,000.

Rosemary E. Ellerbe to John R. Spencer, 0.23 acre, 302 Waterloo St., Warrenton, $370,000.

Adam C. and Emily B. Chiles to Jeffrey S. and Ann Enos, Lot 7, Winchester Mews Subdivision, 174 Winchester Mews Drive, Warrenton, $465,000.


Lee Street

Samantha J. and John K. Ferguson Jr. to Sharon Taylor, 1.5 acres, Lot 14, Wivenhoe Park Subdivision, 14335 Snake Castle Road, Sumerduck, $334,500.

Jonathan C. Shields to Milagros S. Talledo and Nicolas R. Lovo, Lot 33, Neighborhood B, Phase 1, Mintbrook Subdivision, 7558 Hancock St., Bealeton, $325,000.

Foria Younis to Taffae M. Cadeau, 12.5 acres, 12595 Lucky Hill Road, near Remington, $250,000.

Willis E. McCloud to Craig M. Sutphin, Lot 137-R, Phase 4, Wankoma Village Subdivision, 7683 Wankoma Drive, Remington, $253,500.

Hugh J. Peters to Marilyn White, 0.94 acre, Lot 53, Canterbury Village Subdivision, 7857 Knights Court, near Opal, $580,000.

Danielee O. Ritchie to James M. Williamson, Lot 45, Section 1, Phase 2, Lee’s Glen Subdivision, 11689 Battle Ridge Drive, near Remington, $330,000.

Pine Brook Farm Inc. to Joseph D. Amatetti, 77.8 acres and 0.25 acre, Bolton Lane, near Bealeton, $367,000.

David A. Snyder to Immar G. Reyes and Maria D. Rubio, 1.7 acres, Lot 21, Cardinal Meadows Subdivision, 11187 Cardinal Drive, near Remington, $399,000.

William J. Stuart to Hudson W. Maitland, Lot 12, Phase 1, Southcoate Village Subdivision, 11188 Freedom Court, near Bealeton, $410,000.

Jody L. Hoffman and Angela L. Kneisly to Kenneth Cater, 0.39 acre, Lot 12, Remington Ridge Subdivision, 12246 Short St., Remington, $280,000.

Betty A. Saunders to Chane Jackson, Unit 204, Building 4, Phase 4, Waverly Station at Bealeton Condominiums, 6163 Willow Place, Bealeton, $185,000.

Scott E. Strayer to Torrey Hawley and Danielle Walker, 14.5 acres, 4323 Mount Ephraim Road, Sumerduck, $950,000.

Donna L. Fulcher to Victor R. Lopez, 0.45 acre, Lot 23, Block B, Boyd M. Smith Subdivision, 12267 Piney Lane, near Remington, $379,900.

Matthew R. and Mary E. Wilhelm to Kassandra D. Bier, 3.6 acres, Lot 4, Eastridge Estates Subdivision, 13299 Union Church Road, Sumerduck, $345,000.

Levi D. and Amber L. Jerrold to Hazem N. Elhalaby, 7.1 acres, 14378 Rogers Ford Road, Sumerduck, $90,000.


Marshall District

James A. Smith to Zachary I. and Carie Ritz, 1.1 acres, 9483 Lees Mill Road, near Opal, $425,000.

Douglas Hartz to James Longmire and Kelly Laderoute, 5.6 acres, Lot 2, Hyde Subdivision, 10455 John Marshall Highway, near Delaplane, $779,000.

Coramdayo Corp. to Darling Y. Rivas, Unit 6, Section A, Marshall Townhouses, 4509 Fieldstone Court, Marshall, $239,000.

Jeffrey R. McCord and Martha J. Toomey to Jeffrey J. Nanni and Adam M. Vanscoyoc, 1 acre and 0.5 acre, 6464 John Barton Payne Road, near Orlean, $299,000.

Jeffrey S. and Ann L. Enos to Robert and Sanaz Santos, 10 acres, Lot 6, Meadow Ridge Subdivision, 4083 Meadowood Lane, near Marshall, $869,000.

Lakeside Homes LLC, Devin T. Finan as managing member, to Richard M. Sauer and Margaret J. Donohue, 40,000 square feet, Lot 9, Blue Hills Subdivision, 8088 Blue Hills Drive near Warrenton, $842,699.


Scott District

Cynthia E. Petersen, Andrew Dowdy and others to Jose Caceres, 2.7 aces, 5179 Yellowstone Road, near Warrenton, $339,000.

ECH-Vint Hill Associates LLC to Blue Rock LLC, 9.9 acres, Lot 1, 7.2 acres, Lot 2, and 30.4 acres, Lot 3, Land Bay A, Vint Hill, $8,750,000.

Kenneth C. and Linda R. Rehnken to Bradley A. Gehr and Katherine G. Doherty, 1 acre, 7094 Grays Mill Road, near Warrenton, $500,000.

Lisa Paul to Dawning G. Morton, 1.4 acres, Lot 2, Section 7, Broken Hills Estates Subdivision, 7086 Shepherdstown Road, near Warrenton, $511,000.

Peter Vancleave to David J. and Maegen M. Teasley, 1.75 acres, 6300 Beverleys Mill Road, near New Baltimore, $540,750.

David L. and Deborah B. Toms to Timothy A. and Holly C. Carlson, Lot 24, Phase 3, Brookside Subdivision, 6851 Emma Court, near Warrenton, $861,200.

David M. and Tina M. Coram to Clarke J. Ohrstrom, 1 acre, 4139 Halfway Road, near The Plains, $200,000.

Stops Along the Way:  History a hard taskmaster

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·

Analysis: State education funding lags in Virginia

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·
Virginia Mercury File Photo/Ned Oliver
William Fox Elementary School in Richmond.
Lawmakers have determined that they’re not constitutionally required to fund the standards set by the Virginia Board of Education. For the past many years, more than a decade, they haven’t been funding standards set by the education experts in the state.
— Chad Stewart, The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis
By Jackie Llanos Hernandez
The Virginia Mercury

Bristol, Tenn., and Bristol, Va., are so close that Keith Perrigan, superintendent of public schools on this side of the line and president of the Coalition of Small and Rural Schools of Virginia, is reminded of his district’s lack of funding when he looks out his office window and sees the better-funded Tennessee system.

Even though Dr. Perrigan’s district pays a bigger portion of its local school budget out of municipal coffers than its Tennessee counterpart — 24 percent compared to 8 percent — the bigger contribution from the state of Tennessee means Dr. Perrigan’s district falls behind financially. The discrepancy, he said, has led to his teachers leaving to work across the state line.

“They certainly have better teacher salaries than we do,” Dr. Perrigan said. “We tried the very best we can to get our salaries competitive with our neighbors across the state line and we’ve gotten closer with that.”

Despite Virginia’s status as one of the top 10 states for median household income, it ranks 41st in state per-pupil spending, according to The Commonwealth Institute for Fiscal Analysis, a nonpartisan, nonprofit advocacy group in Richmond. Unlike nearby states, Virginia’s school funding formula relies more heavily on local governments, said Chad Stewart, manager of education policy and development at TCI.

“We’re always in the very bottom tier of states for how equitable our state funding is, and also the amount of effort that we put into funding students considering that we’re a relatively rich state,” he said.

Virginia’s Standards of Quality, set by the State Board of Education and subject to revisions and funding decisions by the General Assembly, create the baseline for education programs and staffing at public schools.

“Lawmakers have determined that they’re not constitutionally required to fund the standards set by the Virginia Board of Education,” Mr. Stewart said. “For the past many years, more than a decade, they haven’t been funding standards set by the education experts in the state.”

To fully fund the SOQ, Virginia’s General Assembly would have to spend an additional billion dollars each year, he said.

State funding appropriated pursuant to the standards must be matched by localities according to their ability to pay, which is assessed via the Local Composite Index, a complex formula that takes three factors into consideration for determining what percentage of school funding a locality will be responsible for:

• The true value of real estate, weighted for 50 percent.

• Adjusted gross income, 40 percent.

• Taxable retail sales, 10 percent.

A locality’s index score is then adjusted to keep a statewide local share of 45 percent and an overall state share of 55 percent.

“Virginia places a relatively high burden out of all states on localities to pay for a majority of K-12 costs,” the Commonwealth Institute said in its analysis.

Mr. Stewart said disparities in property taxes are one of the main factors that create inequity in funding.

“You have the examples of wealthier school divisions that are able to raise even more resources because they have high property values in their locality,” he said. “They’re able to far exceed the per-pupil expenditure of poorer divisions.”

Yet, Mr. Stewart said every locality in Virginia raises more funds than the state’s required local match just to meet the needs of students. The difference in funding widens in rural and high-poverty districts where property values are lower. In 2018, Petersburg City Public Schools, which had a poverty rate of 39 percent, spent $11,168 per student, according to an annual state-by-state analysis of public school funding by the Education Law Center, a New Jersey-based advocacy group for equal educational opportunity and education justice.

That figure pales in contrast to Falls Church City Public Schools, a district that had a 2 percent poverty rate and spent nearly $20,000 per student, according to the report.

“Our greatest strength is that we’re resilient,” said Dr. Perrigan, the Bristol superintendent. “We’ll roll up our sleeves and do whatever it takes to do what’s right for kids.

“That also ends up being our greatest weakness, because we are willing to do whatever it takes, and we make things work, sometimes folks will say, ‘We don’t need to give them more money, things are working there’.”

Still, the formula doesn’t accurately calculate the need for funding even in areas with high property values like Fairfax County. Every year since 2002, Del. Vivian Watts(D-Fairfax) has tried to introduce bills or budget language to change the LCI, which she said puts her county at a disadvantage.

“The ability to pay does not reflect at all the taxing power,” she said. “It’s just all in theory, there’s adjusted gross income but you can’t reach it fairly through just upping the real estate tax rate.”

Property values in Fairfax County are far higher than the income of some people who have lived there for decades, Del. Watts said. Therefore, she considers it unfair to raise property taxes.

Dr. Perrigan, Mr. Stewart and Del. Watts say the At-Risk Add-On — a state program developed within the past decade that aims to alleviate the funding disparity by providing additional funds to districts with higher concentrations of students living in poverty — is a promising approach. Currently, funding from the At-Risk Add-On is determined by the number of students who receive free or reduced lunch.

“It may come as a surprise, but over half of my schools have over half of their students in free and reduced lunch, and some of them are 70 percent in free and reduced lunch,” Del. Watts said. “Given the high cost of living in our area, it’s particularly punitive for the families that are trying to make ends meet.”

Approximately 29 percent of Fairfax County students receive free and reduced lunch during the school year.

The Virginia Board of Education is considering revising the At-Risk Add-On to account for annual changes in student enrollment, according to the board’s Sept. 22 SOQ meeting.

Dr. Perrigan said his schools have benefited from the program because Bristol participates in the Community Eligibility Provision program, which allows high poverty school systems to offer free meals to all students in the school system. However, it reduces the funding that might be available from the At-Risk Add-on. Dr. Perrigan said Bristol joined the CEP program in 2014, so the numbers of students living in poverty from that year are still used to calculate the At-Risk Add-On.

“We know that our poverty has increased,” he said.

“A lot of the funding inequity that I see in public education in Virginia is really formula-based. I don’t think it’s purposeful,” Dr. Perrigan said.

As part of a broader equity focus, the Virginia Board of Education has pushed for the creation of an equity fund, a program that would increase the net amount of the At-Risk Add-On and incorporate it in the Virginia code, Mr. Stewart said. So far, the recommendation hasn’t made much headway in the legislature.

“We’re talking more than $100 million, so it’s not a small chunk of change for the state,“ Mr. Stewart said. “However, I think a lot of education advocates for students see it as one of the most essential suggested revisions to our state funding code because of how tied it is to student need and equity.”

Fauquier COVID-19 cases up 63 since Friday report

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·
Tuesday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
62.3%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 44,359. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.5%.


56.2%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 40,025. Statewide, the rate stands at 61.1%.


81,348
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Monday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 63 new COVID-19 cases and 1 more hospitalized patient since the last update Friday, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,699 — with 272 patients hospitalized — since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 33 fewer cases Tuesday morning compared with Monday.

County schools have 36 “active cases,” with 27 among students and 9 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 394 active cases — 282 among students and 112 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 202 students and 5 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 7 — down a total of 12 from the last report a week earlier.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 144 more deaths and 7,460 new cases statewide since Friday, when it provided the last update. Virginia deaths total 13,219 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 895,619.

Fauquier deaths attributed to COVID-19 remain at 82.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,585 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, down 86 since Friday.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,228 cases, up 32 from Friday.

Orange County, 3,521 cases, up 40.

Madison County, 950 cases, up 10.

Rappahannock County, 546 cases, up 8.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 7.8 percent statewide and 10.3 percent in the health district.

Democrats have delivered progress for all Virginians

Posted Tuesday,
October 12, 2021
0 ·

Sara E. Collette

Posted Monday,
October 11, 2021
0 ·

Larry M. Herbert

Posted Sunday,
October 10, 2021
0 ·

White German Sheperd Puppies

Posted Friday,
October 8, 2021
0 ·
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

5 Friday Fauquier factoids: On-time graduation rate

Posted Friday,
October 8, 2021
0 ·
96.2 percent

Of Class of 2021 members in Fauquier’s public high schools graduated on time, according to a new Virginia Department of Education report.

Of 926 students who entered the ninth grade four years ago, 891 graduated in 2021.

A year earlier, the school system’s on-time graduation rate stood at 95.5 percent.

Statewide, 92.9 percent of public school students in the Class of 2021 graduated on time.

In Fauquier, 18 students in the Class of 2021 dropped out of school. The county had a dropout rate of 1.8 percent versus 4.2 percent statewide.


5

County dealerships have manufacturer franchises to sell and service farm tractors, from subcompacts to large agricultural models:

• Arbor Tech Supply at Remington — New Holland.

• Cecil’s Tractors in Warrenton — Mahindra.

• McMichael’s Equipment near New Baltimore — Kioti and Yanmar.

• Virginia Tractor near Warrenton — John Deere.

• Warrenton Equipment south of town — Massey Ferguson.


$13.5 million

The total annual real estate tax revenue “deferred” under Fauquier’s “land use valuation” program.

The county gives landowners tax breaks for property in agricultural, forestall, horticultural and open space use. Fauquier’s board of supervisors for decades has offered the program as an incentive to support farming and to help discourage residential development, which typically costs more in services than homes provide in taxes.

Of the county’s 34,128 real estate parcels, 3,703 qualify for “land use,” according to Commissioner of Revenue Eric Maybach.

The qualifying property has a total fair market value of $1.35 billion.

All property owners pay fair market value taxes on their homes and homesites up to one acre.

Landowners this year must file documentation with Mr. Maybach’s office by Oct. 28 to qualify for the program.


46

Agricultural businesses listed in the 25th Fauquier County Farm Tour brochure.

The self-guided tour, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, has eight featured stops. The brochure also lists 22 vineyards, 10 markets, 6 breweries, 5 orchards and 3 corn mazes around the county.

Fauquier farming accounted for $54.8 million in “cash receipts,” according to the 2017 U.S. Census of Agriculture. The county that year had 1,154 farms and 216,666 acres devoted to agriculture.


59.8 percent

Average share of Fauquier County votes that the Republican nominee has received in the last five elections for governor of Virginia.

Bob McDonnell in 2009 won the biggest Fauquier margin during that period, 68.8 percent on this way to victory over Democrat Creigh Deeds.

GOP nominee Jerry Kilgore in 2005 received the least Fauquier support, 53.3 percent in his statewide loss to Tim Kaine.

With 43.4 percent of the Fauquier vote, Mr. Kaine posted the strongest performance her among the last five Democratic nominees for governor.



32 new COVID-19 cases, 82nd death in county

Posted Friday,
October 8, 2021
0 ·
Fauquier County Public Schools reported 11 new cases Friday morning, but the number of students and staff members in quarantine has decreased by 12 since last week.
Vaccinations
62%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 44,176. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.1%.


55.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 39,780. Statewide, the rate stands at 60.7%.


80,932
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday — up 62 since Tuesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 32 new COVID-19 cases, 2 more hospitalized patients and its 82nd death attributed to the virus, the Virginia Department of Health reported Friday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,636 — with 271 patients hospitalized — since the pandemic started.

Fauquier has averaged 25 new cases and 1 additional hospitalization per day so far in October.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 11 new cases Friday morning.

County schools have 65 “active cases,” with 51 among students and 14 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Liberty High has 11 active cases — with 8 among students and 3 among staff members.

Fauquier public schools have reported 390 active cases — 282 among students and 108 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 202 students and 5 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Oct. 7 — down a total of 12 from the last report a week earlier.

The health department Friday morning reported 44 more deaths and 2,836 new cases statewide since Thursday. Virginia deaths total 13,075 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 888,159.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,671 infected patients in their beds Friday morning, up 2 since Thursday.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,196 cases, up 46 from Thursday, and its 79th death.

Orange County, 3,481 cases, up 18.

Madison County, 940 cases, up 2.

Rappahannock County, 538 cases, up 3.

As of Friday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 8.2 percent statewide and 9.3 percent in the health district.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Friday,
October 8, 2021
0 ·

Appreciation for Ed Risse, human settlement guru

Posted Thursday,
October 7, 2021
0 ·
Ed Risse, who died in August, advocated more efficient use of land and natural resources.
In addition to two critically-acclaimed major land planning graduate-level textbooks, Ed Risse was the primary author of more than 200 studies, articles, essays, reports and handbooks and hundreds of Current Perspectives analyses and policy blogs.
By G. Robert “Bob” Lee
Warrenton

Most folks residing in Greater Warrenton/Fauquier are not aware that Ed Risse (E M Risse), one of the nation’s esteemed land planning theorists and strategists, resided in our community for more than 20 years.

Ed departed this earthly life in August at his last home in the Woodlands development, which he helped plan, in Greater Houston, Texas. Ed and his collaborator wife Linda moved to Warrenton in semi-retirement after Ed’s distinguished career as a land planner for innovative, functional, award-winning communities, including a stint as the chief planner for the Hazel/Peterson Companies. The fortunate residents of Burke Center and a number of other communities in the area that Ed referred to as the Washington-Baltimore New Urban Region are beneficiaries of his design excellence for new planned communities.

Born in California and raised in Montana, and having higher education degrees in mathematics and law, Ed began his academic and land planning careers with the Adirondack Regional Commission (now the Adirondack Park Agency). This heralded regional planning program was created in 1971 by the New York State Legislature to develop long-range public and private land use plans for the largest park in the continental United States.

Over later years, through professional land planning and consulting, continuing human settlement pattern research and education, graduate-level teaching appointments and never-ending astute observation, Ed Risse developed his theoretical foundation for a conceptual framework for rational, functional, efficient and sustainable human settlement patterns, integrating jobs/housing/services/recreation/and amenities.

He published several substantial analytical and practical land planning books, including The Shape of the Future — the Critical, Overarching Impact of Human Settlement Pattern on Citizens’ Economic, Social and Environmental Well-being, …in the 21st Century New Urban Regions.

In addition to two critically-acclaimed major land planning graduate-level textbooks, Ed Risse was the primary author of more than 200 studies, articles, essays, reports and handbooks and hundreds of “Current Perspectives” analyses and policy blogs.

After moving to his last residence in Texas, Ed continued to witness first-hand the consequences of irrational, inefficient and ultimately unsustainable human settlement patterns and the mounting devastation from our reliance on fossil fuels and the resultant exacerbated climate disasters.

Ed’s last sagacious works related to the loss of our shared finite natural resources as adverse consequential outcomes of national policies that do not rationally and appropriately allocate the true costs of human settlement locational decisions. As we reap the climate outcomes of government subsidies for dysfunctional human settlement patterns, we would be well advised to heed the good counsel of the perspicacious scholar who resided in our community.

As our dear departed friend Ed Risse exhorted, we need a better shape for our future.

The writer represents Marshall District on the Fauquier County Planning Commission. He served 15 years as Fauquier’s county administrator after holding the same position in Clarke County. He also worked as executive director of the Virginia Outdoors Foundation.


> Bacon’s Rebellion: RIP, Ed Risse

> Mr. Risse’s archived columns for Bacon’s Rebellion



Best Bets: Farm tour, variety of fall festivals

Posted Thursday,
October 7, 2021
0 ·
Clockwise from top left: St. John’s Oktoberfest, 25th Fauquier County Farm Tour and Chatham County Line at Gloria’s on Saturday night.
If you enjoy fall festivals, Fauquier features everything you could want this weekend.

The 41st St. John’s Oktoberfest will take place Friday and Saturday in Warrenton, with community festivals in Orlean and Remington on Saturday.

The Marshall Farmers Market will conclude its season Friday.

And, the 25th Fauquier County Farm Tour offers a wide variety of fun Saturday.


Marshall Farmers Market and 2nd Friday
4 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8
H&H Auto Garage parking lot
8382 W. Main St., Marshall


Artist, crafters, farmers and other vendors participate in the monthly event. Village shops open late. Sponsored by Marshall Moving Forward.


Saint John’s Oktoberfest
4 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Oct. 8-9
St. John the Evangelist Catholic School
111 King St., Warrenton


The 41st annual festival will feature authentic German food, drink and music, homemade baked goods, carnival games and rides, vendors, silent auction and a battle of the bands. Free admission. Kid wristbands for rides and games: $20 Friday ($100 family maximum) on Friday and $12 ($60 family maximum) on Saturday.


39th Remington Fall Festival
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9
Main Street, Remington


Seventy businesses and organizations, along with six food vendors will have booths on Main Street. Entertainment will include Nashville recording artist Holly Constant. The Remington Baptist Church also will serve breakfast from 7 to 10:30 a.m. Free admission.


Fauquier County Farm Tour
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9
All over the county

The 25th self-guided tour will feature eight stops, including farms, an orchard, breweries and wineries and a market. The tour guide provides information about dozens of other farm businesses around the county. The event will offer demonstrations and activities, including hayrides and a corn maze, to highlight Fauquier’s diverse agricultural industry. Free.


Celebrate Orlean Day
11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9
Village of Orlean
6855 Leeds Manor Road


Marking the village’s 206th anniversary, the festival will feature entertainment, food, exhibits and activities. Opening ceremony at 11:45 a.m. Children’s obstacle course, moon bounce, face painting and contests. Entertainers will include Moe Safren, Jeremy Fox, Stephanie Carter, Jamie Rose, Stephen Moran, Shane Rushing, the Entwined Band, Abigail Turner, Josh Turner and Kevin Rankin. Food vendors, wine and craft beer for sale. Free admission. $20 parking fee donated to Orlean Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department.


Chatham County Line
8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9
Gloria’s Listening Room
92 Main St., Warrenton


The three-member bluegrass and Americana group from Raleigh, N.C., has performed across the U.S. and Europe for more than two decades. Doors open at 7:30. Concessions available. Tickets $25, free for children 12 and younger with parents.


Fall Farm Days
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Monday, Oct. 9-11
Sky Meadows State Park
11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane


The event will feature a variety of working farm exhibits and demonstrations, a children’s play area, live music and Mount Bleak House Tours. Parking fee: $10.


Riverside Preserve Plant Walk
10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 9
Riverside Preserve
8150 Leeds Manor Road, Marshall


Clifton Institute staff members will lead the hike on county-owned property along the Rappahannock River. For ages 12 and older. Fee: $12. Registration required.


Other options


Warrenton Farmers Market
8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 9
21 Main St., Warrenton

Click here for more information.


Farmers Market
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10
Archwood Green Barns
4557 Old Tavern Road, The Plains

Click here for more information.


The Flying Circus Airshow
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10
5114 Ritchie Road, Bealeton

Click here for more information.


Click here for calendar of events.

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Thursday,
October 7, 2021
0 ·

County has 23 new COVID cases, 5 more hospitalized

Posted Thursday,
October 7, 2021
0 ·
Thursday morning COVID-19 update from the Virginia Department of Health.
Vaccinations
62%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 44,176. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.1%.


55.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 39,780. Statewide, the rate stands at 60.7%.


80,932
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday — up 62 since Tuesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 23 new COVID-19 cases and 5 more hospitalized patients, the Virginia Department of Health reported Thursday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,604 — with 269 patients hospitalized and 81 deaths — since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 4 new cases Thursday morning.

County schools have 54 “active cases,” with 42 among students and 12 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Liberty High has 10 active cases — with 7 among students and 3 among staff members.

Fauquier public schools have reported 379 active cases — 273 among students and 106 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 212 students and 7 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Sept. 30 — the most recent report.

The health department Thursday morning reported 32 more deaths and 2,886 new cases statewide since Wednesday. Virginia deaths total 13,031 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 885,323.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,669 infected patients in their beds Thursday morning, down 125 since Wednesday.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,150 cases, up 15 from Wednesday.

Orange County, 3,463 cases, up 14, and its 50th death attributed to the virus.

Madison County, 938 cases, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 535 cases, up 3.

As of Thursday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 8.2 percent statewide and 9.3 percent in the health district — both declining.

Do you plan to get a flu shot this year?

Posted Thursday,
October 7, 2021
0 ·

40 new COVID-19 cases reported in Fauquier

Posted Wednesday,
October 6, 2021
0 ·
After just 7 new cases Tuesday, the county has 40 more Wednesday morning — exceeding the September average of 27 per day.
Vaccinations
62%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Wednesday morning — a total of 44,176. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.1%.


55.9%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 39,780. Statewide, the rate stands at 60.7%.


80,932
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Wednesday — up 62 since Tuesday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
Fauquier has 40 new COVID-19 cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Wednesday morning.

The county’s cases total 6,581 — with 264 patients hospitalized and 81 deaths — since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 7 new cases Wednesday morning. (The school system has students and staff members who live outside of Fauquier.)

County schools have 50 “active cases,” with 38 among students and 12 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Liberty High has 10 active cases — with 7 among students and 3 among staff members.

Fauquier public schools have reported 375 active cases — 269 among students and 106 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 212 students and 7 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Sept. 30 — the most recent report.

The health department Wednesday morning reported 44 more deaths and 3,919 new cases statewide since Tuesday. Virginia deaths total 12,999 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 882,437.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,794 infected patients in their beds Wednesday morning, down 13 since Tuesday.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,135 cases, up 24 from Tuesday, and its 78th death attributed to COVID-19.

Orange County, 3,449 cases, up 34.

Madison County, 934, up 11.

Rappahannock County, 532, up 10.

As of Wednesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 8.3 percent statewide and 10.1 percent in the health district.


Bealeton trail under Rt. 17 will be closed next week

Posted Wednesday,
October 6, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Wednesday,
October 6, 2021
0 ·

He helped prove accuracy of “Greatest Generation” tag

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·
Photo/Lawrence Emerson
Doug Dofflemyer, “Puzzy” Stewart and Keith Emerson at the reception after the funeral of their lifelong friend, C. Edward Waters, on Nov. 16, 2014.
By .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

“The Funny Old Men,” my mother called them.

At least one Tuesday morning a month, they would carpool seven miles down Route 340 to the Hawksbill Diner in Stanley.

At the same Formica-topped table, with the same waitress, they ordered the same breakfasts — every time — for a couple of decades.

Doug Dofflemyer, Eddie Waters, Gene “Puzzy” Stewart and Keith Emerson talked about their families, sports, local news and politics.

The friendships that bound them together wound back to the 1930s in Luray.

When war came, each of them enlisted — Doug and Eddie in the Marine Corps, Puzzy in the Navy and my father in the Army.

The Axis defeated, they came home without some of their friends and got on with quiet, productive lives. Amazingly, each lived into his 90s.

But, the Greatest Generation lost three of their group in 2014, 2017 and 2020.

Only Doug survived, until his passing Sept. 27 at the age of 97.

Carroll Douglas Dofflemyer lived a truly remarkable life — one worth far more than a few words here. A single mother raised him in a time when that seemed unusual.

He and my father became friends in the first grade, meeting when the teacher lined up her students alphabetically by their last names.

After they raised two sons, Doug lost his wife Anna more than 46 years ago. Then he lost virtually all of his sight.

But, on any morning until recently, passing motorists would spot him at the east end of Luray, a couple of miles from his South Court Street home, walking purposefully with white cane in hand.

Doug had a device that lighted and magnified the Page News & Courier and Harrisonburg Daily News-Record so he could stay abreast of the news.

He never complained or made excuses. He relished life and engagement with others, maintaining a full calendar of activities.

About a decade ago, after I reloaded my then-85-year-old father’s weed whacker with fresh string, Doug heard about it and wanted me to teach him the technique.

Although he’d long ago surrendered his license, Doug routinely drove a Ford F-150 through his field above the Hawksbill Creek.

Pastor David Blevins, who retired from the Remington Baptist Church a few years ago and moved back to Luray, in his eulogy last Thursday captured the man perfectly.

Doug had given up his role as a deacon of the Main Street Baptist Church, but he remained devout and devoted, preferring to wash dishes for dinners there in the last years of his life.

Pastor David recounted the ways in which “Mr. D” had improved the lives of countless Luray kids — helping to build the Little League ballpark, serving on the Page Memorial Hospital board, serving on the regional Boy Scouts Council and providing “taxi” rides to and from events.

About 30 minutes later, a large honor guard from Quantico carried their fellow Marine, who had stormed the beach at Okinawa, to his final resting place atop the Evergreen Cemetery hill, punctuating the service with a precise flag presentation ceremony, a 21-gun salute and . . . Taps.

In our house, only words of reverence followed any mention of Doug Dofflemyer. My late parents valued his friendship and admired his dignity. My brother Philip and I came to share that appreciation.

May everyone have such a friend.

Don’t remain in the dark about public education

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

39th Remington Fall Festival Saturday, Oct. 9

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

Va. redistricting panel “stuck” as deadline looms

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·
Virginia Mercury Photo/Ned Oliver
The 16-member Virginia Redistricting Commission considers draft maps for new legislative districts.
You have to take history into consideration when you’re discussing things like this. We’d be making a huge mistake if we didn’t.
— Commission member Brandon Hutchins, a Democratic Navy veteran from Virginia Beach.
By Graham Moomaw
The Virginia Mercury

Last month, Greta Harris took a break from trying to corral the eight Republicans and eight Democrats on the Virginia Redistricting Commission to make an impassioned plea.

It wasn’t too long ago, she said, that Black Virginians like her were systematically denied the right to vote. Some of the new political maps up for consideration by the commission, she said, didn’t seem to reflect the moral imperative to protect the progress made by minority voters.

“Citizens who look like me who got up every day, went to work, tried to do things to ensure that their kids had a bright future, were denied that simply because of the color of their skin,” said Ms. Harris, a Richmond affordable housing advocate serving as the commission’s Democratic co-chair. “Let’s step up and do the right thing.”

Her comments drew a rejoinder from Republican commissioner Richard Harrell, a trucking executive from Southwest Virginia. He said all Virginians’ voting rights matter.

“We just can’t go off on an emotional tangent and try to resolve issues from the past,” Mr. Harrell said. “That’s regrettable. That’s the past. We’re dealing with today.”

With an Oct. 10 deadline approaching to finish new General Assembly maps, race remains one of the toughest dividing lines left for the commission to overcome, one that could potentially derail its efforts to reach consensus and send a proposal to the legislature for an up-or-down vote.

Disagreements over how much to allow racial demographics to guide the commission’s work were a major factor in its inability to produce a comprehensive pair of maps for public hearings scheduled this week. Instead, the commission is asking the public to weigh in on multiple proposals in the hope outside feedback could guide its final push for compromise when it reconvenes Friday.

Some commissioners seem more optimistic than others about whether consensus is even possible. If the commission fails in its first-ever effort to redraw Virginia’s political maps, which would leave the Supreme Court of Virginia to draw new maps, the differing legal and philosophical views on obligations to racial minorities could be the breaking point.

Drawing political boundaries guided too much by race can violate constitutional rules requiring equal treatment under the law. At the same time, the process cannot be race-blind due to the Voting Rights Act, the landmark federal law meant to protect the political rights of Black Americans once deliberately excluded from democratic participation. Broadly, Section 2 prohibits discrimination in elections on the basis of race, color or language. But the U.S. Supreme Court hasn’t established a precise legal framework for how it applies to redistricting, the once-a-decade process of redrawing political districts to account for population shifts.

The Redistricting Commission has hired two partisan consulting teams, and the two sides’ lawyers are giving commissioners conflicting advice.

The Democratic team sees race as a more central consideration, advising the commission it has a legal duty to seize every chance to draw districts favorable for minorities without straying too far from other rules requiring compact, cohesive districts. Instead of simply ensuring Black majorities in some districts, they say, the commission must work to create “opportunity districts” that racial minorities could effectively control by comprising 40 to 50 percent of the voting-age population therein.

Democrats have reminded their GOP counterparts the redistricting reform amendment Virginia voters approved overwhelmingly last year states the commission “shall provide, where practicable, opportunities for racial and ethnic communities to elect candidates of their choice.”

“If you have politically cohesive groups that are near each other, geographically compact, such districts are required under Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act,” said J. Gerald Hebert, a Democratic adviser.

The Republican team disagrees. They acknowledge drawing majority-Black districts is essential for Voting Rights Act compliance, but insist the commission isn’t obligated to go beyond that and draw as many opportunity districts as possible. Doing so, they argue, is a legally risky approach that overemphasizes race for political ends.

“Opportunity for what? To elect more Democrats?” Sen. Bill Stanley (R-Franklin) said at a meeting Saturday.

Though the commission has at times struggled with its own racial analysis of its ever-shifting draft plans, Republican maps generally have more majority-Black districts, and Democratic maps tend to spread racial minorities out among significantly more opportunity districts. According to analysis from the Virginia Public Access Project, the current Democratic plans draw four additional opportunity districts in the House and three additional opportunity districts in the Senate.

Independent redistricting experts at the Princeton Gerrymandering Project have given the latest Democratic draft maps better fairness ratings than the Republican drafts. Grades for the House proposals have been fairly similar, but the Republican-drawn Senate map received an F rating while the Democratic map received an A. Republican commissioners have been largely dismissive of outside analysis, suggesting hidden partisan motivations may lie within ostensibly nonpartisan groups.

Heavily White areas have been easiest for the commission to handle. But progress has been slower for Richmond and Hampton Roads, regions with the highest concentrations of Black voters.

“We’re sort of stuck,” Ms. Harris said late last week as a lengthy discussion of House of Delegates districts in Hampton Roads ended with no clear decision on how to proceed.

Whenever the commission has reached gridlock, it has usually found a way to move on without taking votes that might result in an 8-8, party-line split.

Both sets of lawyers agree the commission has to make careful, analytical decisions when considering race, and can’t simply pick a number of minority districts that feels right and draw maps to hit that target.

That’s led to complex discussions of how many Black or minority voters are necessary to make a district “perform” on their behalf without veering into racial packing, the unconstitutional practice that caused federal courts to overturn and redraw some districts created in Virginia’s 2011 redistricting process.

Memories of 2011 have at times created tension due to the commission’s hiring of John Morgan, a Republican map-drawer involved in creating the 2011 maps deemed racially gerrymandered. During a discussion of racial dynamics in rural Southside Virginia, where White and Black Voters diverge most sharply in their political preferences, Democratic consultant Kareem Crayton pointedly reminded commissioners of Mr. Morgan’s past.

“I gotta mention, I think Mr. Morgan was the person who drew the unconstitutional maps in the first place in the Southside area,” Crayton said. “So I’m not necessarily convinced that his assertion of what his personal experience is of what works and doesn’t work in the Southside is one I’m going to rely upon.”

Mr. Morgan said the House district in question for that area was removed from the legal challenge over the 2011 lines because courts ruled map-drawers had considered race appropriately for that district while erring in 11 others.

“While I was involved in the map-drawing process, I wasn’t the person who was making the final decisions on that,” Mr. Morgan said.

The area in question is currently represented by Del. Rosyln Tyler (D-Sussex). Sen. George Barker (D-Fairfax) highlighted her precarious position to argue for strong minority protection.

When facing Republican opponents under the 2011 lines, Ms. Tyler, who is Black, easily won re-election with more than 60 percent of the vote. But her district got more competitive in 2019 when a federal court redrew parts of the House map to unpack Black voters. Mr. Barker noted Ms. Tyler came close to losing in 2019 to Republican challenger Otto Wachsmann, who is running against her again this year in a tight race.

“It is important, I think, to make sure that we make this district one where the African-American population can control things,” Mr. Barker said.

Both draft plans draw a majority-Black district for the area.

While drawing new House maps in 2011, the Republican majority at the time used a 55 percent black voting-age population target to ensure a floor of districts Black communities could control.
That target was appropriate for Ms. Tyler’s district at the time, federal courts eventually ruled, but too crude an approach to be justified in the other 11 challenged districts. The court case hinged on the question of whether map-drawers inappropriately elevated race as a predominant factor to draw maps with too-strong Black majorities, effectively diluting the Black vote elsewhere.

Fighting all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, House Republicans insisted they had to consider race as they did to comply with the Voting Rights Act. The high court dismissed the House GOP appeal in 2019 on largely technical grounds, finding one legislative chamber couldn’t continue to fight a lower court’s ruling with Attorney General Mark Herring declining to do so on behalf of the state’s official legal apparatus.

By not settling the merits of the case, that ruling allowed uncertainty to persist over when prioritizing race is appropriate for Voting Rights Act compliance and when it becomes impermissible racial gerrymandering.

When the Redistricting Commission’s deliberations returned to race at a meeting Saturday, Republican commissioner Jose Feliciano, a Fredericksburg-area military veteran and the only Hispanic member of the 16-person commission, recalled how his grandfather was repeatedly blocked from voting after coming to the mainland from Puerto Rico in 1947. He said he sees voting not as a right or a privilege, but a duty.

“Even when I was in the desert, I did the absentee ballots,” he said. “I would never vote to disenfranchise anyone.”

Black commissioners have said their concerns aren’t rooted in emotion, but hard truths about the past.

“You have to take history into consideration when you’re discussing things like this,” said Brandon Hutchins, a Democratic Navy veteran from Virginia Beach. “We’d be making a huge mistake if we didn’t.”

With Democrats and Republicans alternating being in charge of running meetings, Ms. Harris said she’s dreading that it will be her turn to preside over Friday’s effort to bridge the divide over racial fairness. She encouraged everyone to “lift their hearts and minds to other citizens,” but said she doesn’t see how an “integration” will happen.

“I’m at a loss as to how we go forward,” she said.

Overall, do you think social media have been good or bad for society?

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

New COVID-19 cases drop after September surge

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·
County schools reported 10 more cases Tuesday morning.
Vaccinations
62%
of Fauquier citizens have received at least one dose as of Monday morning — a total of 44,146. Statewide, the rate stands at 68.1%.


55.8%
of county residents have completed vaccination — a total of 39,747. Statewide, the rate stands at 60.6%.


80,870
total doses of vaccine administered to Fauquier residents as of Tuesday — up 47 since Sunday.


Getting the vaccine

Everyone 12 and older in Virginia qualifies for COVID-19 vaccination. All who have received two doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine will be eligible for a booster, starting Sept. 20.

Medical offices and pharmacies offer the vaccines free of charge. The health department also has walk-in clinics, with no appointment needed.

Click here for more information or call 877-829-4682.

> Pfizer vaccine booster available to some people
The spread of COVID-19 has slowed in Fauquier and across the state after a September surge.

Fauquier has just 7 new cases, the Virginia Department of Health reported Tuesday morning.

The county last month had 810 new infections — an average of 27 per day, 35 hospitalizations and 9 deaths attributed to COVID-19.

The county’s cases total 6,541 — with 264 patients hospitalized and 81 deaths — since the pandemic started.

Fauquier County Public Schools reported 11 new cases Tuesday morning. (The school system has students and staff members who live outside of Fauquier.)

County schools have 50 “active cases,” with 37 among students and 13 among staff members.

The school system defines active cases as those reported in the last 10 days.

Fauquier public schools have reported 368 active cases — 263 among students and 105 among staff members — since the fall semester started Aug. 11.

The schools had 212 students and 7 staff members in quarantine as of Thursday, Sept. 30 — the most recent report.

The health department Tuesday morning reported 47 more deaths and 1,428 new cases statewide since Monday. Virginia deaths total 12,955 since the pandemic started and cases stand at 878,518.

Virginia hospitals reported 1,807 infected patients in their beds Tuesday morning, down 103 since Monday. The state’s hospitals have housed 71,698 infected patients since the pandemic started.

The county continues to trail the state in the percentage of residents vaccinated. (See box.)

Elsewhere in the Rappahannock Rapidan Health District:

Culpeper County has 6,111 cases, up 1 from Monday, and the 77th death attributed to COVID-19.

Orange County, 3,415 cases, up 7.

Madison County, 923, up 4.

Rappahannock County, 522, unchanged.

As of Tuesday morning, the rate of positive PCR tests over the last week stood at 8.5 percent statewide and 10.4 percent in the health district.

Tentative graduation dates set for Fauquier schools

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

Piedmont Regional Art Show & Sale Oct. 22-24

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

Stops Along the Way:  Meeting Claude – Volume 1

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Tuesday,
October 5, 2021
0 ·

Oppose the real extremists controlling of education

Posted Monday,
October 4, 2021
0 ·

Computers for education group seeking volunteers

Posted Monday,
October 4, 2021
0 ·

Fauquier Sheriff’s Office daily activity report

Posted Monday,
October 4, 2021
0 ·

Delaplane home, 10 acres sell for $1.7 million

Posted Monday,
October 4, 2021
0 ·
This home on 10 acres near Delaplane sold for $1.7 million.
A five-bedroom home on 10 acres near Delaplane sold recently for $1.7 million.

Built in 1991, the 6,600-square-foot brick home has 5-1/2 bathrooms, a gourmet kitchen, a sunroom, stone fireplaces, a finished basement, a swimming pool, a stone patio with a waterfall, a spa, a deck, extensive landscaping and an oversized, 3-car garage.

The Marshall District property went on the market in July with an asking price of $1.7 million, according to Realtor.com.

Jennifer Mead of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services PenFed Realty represented the seller and Scott Buzzelli of Middleburg Real Estate represented the buyer.

The sale tops the most recent list of Fauquier real estate transactions.

Also recently:

• A three-bedroom home on 32 acres at Hume sold for $1.4 million.

• A commercial building on 2.9 acres at Opal sold for $1.15 million.

The Fauquier County Circuit Court clerk’s office recorded these real estate transfers Sept. 23-29, 2021:


Cedar Run District

RFI WC LC, Steven W. Rodgers as managing member, to NVR Inc., 0.6 acre, Lot 117, Phase 2, Warrenton Chase Subdivision, near Warrenton, $242,000.

Laura Hall to Libero Investments LLC, 1.2 acres, 7620 Greenwich Road, near Nokesville, $240,000.

Mark G. Buchko, trustee to Hansford and Aaron Conner, 36.9 acres, Old Auburn Road, 4 miles east of Warrenton, $470,000.

Carey E. Inman Jr. to Harry W. Reineke IV, 5 acres, 14038 Blackwells Mill Road, Goldvein, $375,000.

Kevin P. and Elizabeth A. Selby to Mark H. Branca, 2 acres, 7772 Greenwich Road, near Catlett, $512,000.

Samuel F. and Dorain A. Elswick to Robert D. Studds Jr., 1.5 acres, off Dumfries Road, near Catlett, $90,000.

Sandy Spring Bank, trustee, to Arcade Properties LLC, 9.2 acres, Catlett Road, near Midland, $210,000.

Sandy Spring Bank, trustee, to Arcade Properties LLC, 30.2 acres, Catlett Road, near Midland, $490,000.

Trung C. Duong and Ly T. Dinh to Nhon C. Duong, 0.88 acre, 9567 James Madison Highway, near Opal, $145,000.

David R. Colton Jr. to Jesse J. and Kayla R. Outland, 110.5 acres, 3134 Midland Road, Midland, $183,000.

Jaysyn J. and Cynthia M. Carson to Robin E. Brodie, 16.4 aces, 4450 Old Auburn Road, near Catlett, $782,000.


Center District

Bradley J. and Kimberley A. Smith to Calvert Avenue LLC, Lot 48, Section 2, Copper Mill Subdivision 810 Colonel Edmonds Court, Warrenton, $396,000.

Jeffrey D. and Jamie L. Weiss to James and Marilyn Christiano, Lot 35, Phase 2, Carriage House Chase Subdivision, 241 Carriage Chase Circle, Warrenton, $550,000.

Melissa A. Maxley to Mary J. Batsakis, trustee, Lot A-4, Phase 3, North Rock Subdivision, 239 North View Circle, Warrenton, $500,000.

Jorge A.C Delgado and Yancy Gonzalez to Shane Kehl and Teresa Debrey Lot 42, Phase 2, Ridges of Warrenton Subdivision, 385 Cannon Way, Warrenton, $655,550.

Travis N. and Amanda J. barber to Julie G. Coonce, Lot 389, Addition to Warrenton Lakes Subdivision, 7154 Chesterfield Drive, near Warrenton, $693,500.

Paul and Roma Maycock, trustees to Ana L. Edwin Bonilla, 1,200 square feet, Unit 218, Towns of Oak Springs, 822 Wide Oak Court, Warrenton, $304,000.

Laine W. and Robert M. Iten IV to Trigon Homes LLC, 1.3 acres, Lot 2, 1.3 acres, Lot 3, 1.4 acres, Lot 4, and 1.6 acres, Lot 5, Blackwell Knolls Subdivision, Blackwell Road, near Warrenton, $756,000.


Lee District

Rish Equipment Co. to 10214 Fayettesville LLC, 2.9 acres, 10214 Fayettesville Road, Opal, $1,150,000.

Arie M. Scott to John C. and Marsha P. Metz, Lot 99, Phase 4, Wankoma Village Subdivision, 7622 Wankoma Drive, Remington, $195,000.

Stephanie Hamlett to Travis L. Codding Sr. and Travis L. Codding Jr., Lot 104, Phaser 2, Section 1-A, The Meadows Subdivision, 7003 Just Court East, near Remington, $335,000.

Earl and Donna Nobles to Samantha Wesley, 0.59 acre, Lot 162, Section D, Edgewood East Subdivision, 11301 Falling Creek Drive, Bealeton, $510,000.

David A. Yancey to Christopher and Kerri Burroughs, Lot 46, Phase 2-B, Section 2, Bealeton Station Subdivision, 6131 Waverly Way, Bealeton, $449,900.


Marshall District

Gregory J. and Jennifer M. Meade to Susan M. and Tim Deehan, 10 acres, Lot 46, Fleetwood Farms Subdivision, $1,700,000.

Mackie L. and Megan J. Jenkins to Brian S. and Mary Briscombe, 2.6 acres, 3276 Rokeby Road, Delaplane, $740,000.

Glen E. Alderton to Trigon Homes LLC, 3 acres, Lot 2, Meadowville Subdivision, Merry Oaks Road, near The Plains, $225,000.

Atkins Construction Group LLC, Danny M. Atkins as managing member, to Joseph and Renee C. Gallagher, 1.6 acres, Leighton Forest Road, near Warrenton, $200,000.

Porter Gaier to Michael and Jennifer B. Flammia, 1.3 acres, 7021 Leeds Manor Road, Orlean, $675,000.

Edward M. Pearson, trustee, to Ashley N. Cartwright, Lot 2, Section 1, Mauzy Square Subdivision 8332 Mauzy Square, Marshall, $227,500.

Kenneth L. Smith to Raymond T. Henger, 32.4 acres, 14261 Hume Road, Hume $1,400,000.

Christian C. Kautz-Scanavy to J. Christopher and Deborah S.P. Cloud, 10.9 acres, 9335 Crest Hill Road, near Marshall, $450,000.

Jennifer B. Flammia to Kelly J. Andrews 7.2 acre, Lot 7-A, Mills Subdivision 6231 Park Place, Hume, $800,000.

Troy M. and James T. Wilson to James L. and Lucinda R. Wilson, 12.5 acres, 8058 Black Snake Lane, near Warrenton, $320,000.

Gladys A. Cheek, trustee, and others to Kelley-Seuter Management LLC, 10 acres, south side of Goose Creek near Delaplane, $85,400.
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50 Culpeper Street, Suite 3
Warrenton, Virginia 20187
540.359.6574
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